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DUKE 
UNIVERSITY 




LIBRARY 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2012 with funding from 
Duke University Libraries 



http://www.archive.org/details/dukeuniversityca1968duke 



Duke University 

CALENDAR- 




.June 9-16, 1968 



Sunday, June 9 



10:20 



June 9th-22nd, Sunday-Saturday, Basketball 
Clinic. 

a.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Chal- 
lenges in Education. " WCHL Chapel Hill. Dr. 
George Pearsall will discuss "Deforming Ma- 
terials by Vibrations." 

9 :00-9 :15 a.m. Carillon Recital. Mr. J. Samuel Ham- 
mond, University Carillonneur. 

9 :30 a.m. University Service of Worship. Univer- 
sity Chapel. Preacher : The Reverend Dr. Thor 
Hall, Associate Professor of Preaching and 
Theology, Divinity School. Broadcast over 
WDNC and WDNC-FM. 

11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship broadcast 
over Radio Station WDNC and WDNC-FM. 

4 :00 p.m. Summer Session at International House. 
International House — 2022 Campus Drive. 

8:30 p.m. Duke University Radio Program. "Chal- 
lenges in Education." WPTF Raleigh. Mrs. 
Lulu W. Hassenplug will discuss "To Be A 

Nurse." 



Monday, June 10 

12:00 noon Dormitories ready for occupancy. 

00-3:30 p.m. West Campus Pool open for women. 

00-5:30 p.m. Summer Session Recreational Pro- 
gram. Card Gymnasium. 

4 :25-5 :45 p.m. West Campus Pool open for men. 

7 :00 p.m. International Folk Dancing. International 
House — 2022 Campus Drive. 

8 :15-9 :30 p.m. West Campus Pool open to faculty 
members and their families. Faculty children 
must be accompanied by their parents. 



i 



Tuesday, June 11 

8 :30 a.m.-l :00 p.m. Registration for Term I Sum- 
mer Session. Room 119 Allen Building. 



2:00-3:30 p.m. West Campus Pool open for women. 

2 :00-5 :30 p.m. Summer Session Recreational Pro- 
gram. Card Gymnasium. 

4 :25 p.m. West Campus Pool open for men. 

7 :00 p.m. Library Introduction Slide Lecture. Room 
136 Social Sciences Building. 



Wednesday, June 12 

7 :40 a.m. Instruction begins in all courses of the 
First Term except 4 s.h. science courses. 

12 noon-10:00 p.m. Student Union Recreational Fa- 
cilities open. 03 Flowers Building. Game 
Room. 

2 :00-3 :30 p.m. West Campus Pool open for women. 

2 :00-5 :30 p.m. Summer Session Recreational Pro- 
gram. Card Gymnasium. 

3 :30 p.m. Library Introduction Slide Lecture. Room 
136 Social Sciences Building. 

4 :25-5 :45 p.m. West Campus Pool open for men. 

5 :00-7 :30 p.m. Summer Entertainment Program : 
"Hollow Rock String Band." West Campus 
Quadrangle. 

7 :00 and 9 :00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page Au- 
ditorium. "GEORGY GIRL" with James Ma- 
son, Alan Bates, and Lynn Redgrave. "Su- 
perb! Played with slam-bang high spirits and 
great charm by Lynn Redgrave!" — The Nev> 
Yorker. 



Thursday, June 13 

12:00 noon-10:00 p.m. Student Union Recreational 
Facilities open. 03 Flowers Building. Game 
Room. 

2 :00-3 :30 p.m. West Campus Pool open for women. 

2 :00-5 :30 p.m. Summer Session Recreational Pro- 
gram. Card Gymnasium. 

4 :25-5 :45 p.m. West Campus Pool open for men. 

8 :15-9 :30 p.m. West Campus Swimming Pool open 
to facultv members and their families. Fac- 



ulty children will be admitted only when ac- 
companied by their parents. 



Friday, June 14 



12 noon-10:00 p.m. Student Union Recreational Fa- 
cilities open. 03 Flowers Building. Game 
Room. 

2:00-3:30 p.m. West Campus Pool open for women 

2 :00-5 :30 p.m. Summer Session Recreational Pro- 
gram. Card Gymnasium. 

4 :25-5 :45 p.m. West Campus Pool open for men. 



Saturday, June 15 

12 noon-10:00 p.m. Student Union Recreational Fa- 
cilities open. 03 Flowers Building. Game 
Room. 

9:55 a.m. Duke University Radio Program. "Chal- 
lenges in Education." WDNC Durham. Dr. 
George Pearsall will discuss "Deforming Ma- 
terials by Vibrations." 

2 :00-3 :30 p.m. West Campus Pool open for women. 

4:25-5:45 p.m. West Campus Pool open for men. 
5:00-6:00 p.m. Chapel Choir Rehearsal. Chapel. 



Sunday, June 16 

12 noon-10:00 p.m. Student Union Recreational Fa- 
cilities open. 03 Flowers Building. Game 
Room. 

10:20 a.m. Duke University Radio Program. "Chal- 
lenges in Education." WCHL Chapel Hill. 
Mrs. Julia Mueller will discuss "A Summer 
Program in Italy." 

9:00-9:15 a.m. Carillon Recital. Mr. J. Samuel 
Hammond, University Carillonneur. 

9 :30 a.m. University Service of Worship. Uni- 
versity Chapel. Preacher: The Reverend Dr." 
James T. Cleland. Dean of the Chapel. 

11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship broadcast 
over Radio Station WDNC aud WDNC-FM. 

4 :00 p.m. Summer Session at International House. 
International House — 2022 Campus Drive. 

8:30 p.m. Duke University Radio Program. "Chal- 
lenges in Education." WPTF Raleigh. Dr. 
Donald E. Stone will discuss "The Importance 
of Tropical Studies." 



SUMMER SCHOOL PREACHING SCHEDULE: 
JUNE AND JULY 

June : 

16— The Reverend Dr. James T. Cleland 

Dean of the Chapel; James B. Didte Professor 

of Preaching 
23— The Reverend Dr. Wilson O. Weldon 

Editor, The Upper Room 

Nashville, Tennessee 
30— The Reverend Dr. Howard C. Wilkinson 

Chaplain to the University 

July: 

7— Dr. Albert N. Whiting 

President. North Carolina College 

14— Dean Cleland 

21— The Reverend Dr. J. S. Whale 
Newton Abbot 
Devon, England 

28— The Reverend Dr. John W. Carlton 
Associate Professor of Preaching 
Southern Baptist Theological Seminary 
Louisville. Kentucky 



SUMMER SESSION AT 
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE 
The International House, 2022 Campus Drive, is 
open during the summer every Sunday evening from 
4 :00 p.m. Visiting at International House is not re- 
stricted to foreign students, and anyone is welcome to 
attend. The Sunday evening program may feature 
special events, which will be announced separately, 
but the House recreation facilities are always avail- 
able. These include badminton, ping-pong, bridge, 
and many other games, a slide projector and stereo 
phonograph (bring your own records). Light re- 
freshments will he available. Summer session stu- 
dents, special conference visitors, and other members 
of the Duke Summer Community are invited to drop 
in on any Sunday evening. Call extension 2767 Mon- 
day through Friday, 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. for more 
information. 



INTERNATIONAL FOLK DANCING 

International Folk Dancing will be held on Mon- 
days from 7 :00 p.m. to dark. International House — 
2022 Campus Drive. No previous experience neces- 
sary. 



ADVANCE NOTICE 

CLASSES WILL NOT MEET ON JULY 4th. 

5th, and 6th 

1968 SUMMER SESSION— Registration for Term I 

for the 1968 Summer Session will be Tuesday, June 

11th, from 8:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. in the Summer Ses- 



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sion Office. 119 Allen Building. Term II registration 
must, be completed by Friday, July 19th. (Fees for 
Term II may be paid in advance by July 10th.) Sum- 
mer Session Bulletins and information may be ob- 
tained at Room 119 Allen Building or by calling ex- 
tension 2621. 

HOURS OF THE OFFICE OF THE SUMMER 

SESSION— The Office of the Summer Session will 
be open from 8 :30 a.m. to 5 :00 p.m. Monday through 
Friday, and from 9 :00 a.m. to 12 :30 p.m. on Satur- 
days throughout the summer. 

SUMMER SESSION IDENTIFICATION AND AD- 
MISSION CARDS— Students identification cards 
may be secured at the Summer Session Office on or 
after June 12th. These cards will serve as health 
and recreation cards for the Summer Session. 
Summer Session identification and admission cards 
will be issued to members of the faculty and staff at 
the Summer Session Office, 119 Allen Building, after 
June 12th. 

COURSE CHANGES— Course changes for the Sum- 
mer Session courses (Term I) will be made in the 
Summer Session Office. 119 Allen Building, on June 
12th-14th. 



LIBRARY INTRODUCTION SLIDE LECTURE 
For the benefit of new students, both graduate and 
undergraduate, the Perkins Library will offer a slide- 
lecture introduction to the library's resources, ser- 
vices, and arrangements on Tuesday, June 11th, at 
7:00 p.m. and again on Wednesday, June 12th, at 
3 :30 p.m. in Room 136 Social Sciences Building. The 
presentation will last about one hour. Note that 
the location is not the Library, but Social Sciences 
Building. 



DUKE SUMMER ENTERTAINMENT 
PROGRAM 

An interesting and varied program of entertain- 
ment has been planned for the Summer Sessions to 
which the community is cordially invited. Sponsored 
by the Summer Sessions Office and Quadrangle Pic- 
tures, the programs are planned and executed through 
the Student Activities Office (684-2911, Room 202-A 
and 209 Flowers Building). 

In addition to Wednesday evening film showings 
at 7 :00 and 9 :00 p.m. by Quadrangle Pictures in 
Page Auditorium, a new 16mm subscription Film Se- 
ries is planned for the summer at 8 :00 p.m. (one show- 
ing) in the air conditioned auditorium of Biological 
Sciences Building. Both film programs are open to 
the public. Admission at the Page Box Office for 
Quadrangle Picture is priced at 600 for adults and 
100 for children (12 years old and under). The 16mm 
Film Series tickets may be secured in Page Box Office 
as follows: $3.50 for the entire Series (6 perfor- 



mances) ; $1.75 for 1 semester Series (3 performances) 
or 750 at the door for a single performance. 

The first "live" free performance will begin with 
an outside picnic performance by the "Hollow Rock 
String Band" on Wednesday, June 12th beginning at 
5 :00 p.m. in the West Campus Dormitory Quadrangle. 
The entire community is invited to use the Dining 
Hall picnic supper preparations taking some to the 
quadrangle for the picnic-concert- (perhaps square 
dancing) and continuing this introductory evening of 
entertainment by attending one of the two free (7:00 
or 9:00 p.m.) "Flicks" at Quadrangle Pictures in 
Page Auditorium. The Celestial Omnibus, Duke's 
Coffee house, located on the ground floor adjacent to 
Page Auditorium, will be open following the Flick 
Showings. A cordial invitation is extended to those 
wishing to drop by during the evening. 

The Hollow Rock String Band composed of Duke 
and U.N.C. faculty and graduate students include 
Alan Jabbour. fiddle ; Tom Thompson, banjo ; Barbara 
Thompson, guitar; Eric Olson, banjo and auto harp; 
Joann Jones, guitar and voice, and Bill Camp, square 
caller. Those who heard the group during the Student 
Union Folk Festival will know what a pleasure is 
in store. 

The second free concert will be presented on Satur- 
day, June 29th by the distinguished North Carolina 
String Quartet at 8 :15 p.m. in the West Union Ball- 
room. Other concerts and performances will be an- 
nounced at a later date. 



SUMMER SESSION UNIVERSITY 
SERVICE OF WORSHIP 
Following a pattern set during the last four sum- 
mers, the University Service of Worship during the 
Summer Session will commence at 9 :30 a.m. instead 
of 11:00 a.m. On the "Recess" Sunday, June 9th 
and on each of the regular Summer Session Sundays 
thereafter, the service will begin at 9 :30 a.m. 



STUDENT UNION RECREATIONAL 
FACILITIES 

The Student Union Game Room will be open for 
use during the Summer Session. The Game Room, 
located in 03 Flowers Building beneath the Gothic 
Bookstore, will be open from 12 noon to 10 :00 p.m. 
daily for billiards and table tennis beginning Wednes- 
day, June 12th. Playing cards, chess sets, and check- 
ers may be secured at the Information Center for use 
in the building. 



DUKE HOSPITAL AUXILIARY 
The Duke Hospital Auxiliary cordially invites 
new women students, wives of students, and faculty 
wives to become volunteers in one of the services of- 
fered by the Auxiliary to Duke Hospital. 

Work as a volunteer — as much or as little time as 



(3) 



vim can give — offers not only personal satisfaction, 
but a good way to become acquainted with others of 
the University Community. Call Mrs. Mary Daugh- 
erty, ext. 3981, for further information. 



RECREATIONAL USE OF DUKE FOREST 
Members of the University Community are invited 
to make use of the Duke Forest for recreational pur- 
poses. 

The Forest rules, which are strictly enforced, are : 

1. No fires of an}' kind are permitted in the Forest, at any time 
except in the grills at the 4 improved picnic sites. 

2. Cars, motorcycles and motor scooters are not allowed within 
the Forest or on the Forest roads except at the 4 improved 
picnic sites. 

3. Gates must not be blocked at any time. The roads are for 
emergency use as well as normal access in the operation of 
the Forest. 

4. No trees, brush or grasses may be cut, scarred, or in any 
way mutilated as such damage will destroy research projects. 

5. Hunting or shooting of fire arms and air rifles are not per- 
mitted. 

The foregoing rules are to protect the large invest- 
ment in time, money, and human energy on research 
projects established within the Duke Forest. 

Recreational use of the Forest in the form of hik- 
ing, picnicking, and fishing is permitted as long as 
the five Forest rules are not violated. 

A picnic site may be reserved and the key checked 
out ($1.00 deposit on key required) at the Duke 
Forest Office in the Biological Sciences Building, 
West Campus — extension 2198. There is no charge for 
the use of the picnic areas. 



SWIMMING POOL SCHEDULE 
The swimming pool will be open Monday-Saturday 
according to the following schedule : 



Women : 
Men: 



2:00-3 :30 p.m. 
4:25-5:45 p.m. 



FACULTY NIGHT 

Monday and Thursday nights: 8 :15-9 :30 p.m. 

Faculty members and their families. Children will 
be admitted only when accompanied by their parents. 

Special Mixed Swimming Parties may be sched- 
uled by student groups on Tuesday, Wednesday, and 
Saturday nights. 



SUMMER SESSION CHAPEL CHOIR 
AUDITIONS 
Auditions are now being held for the Summer 
Session Chapel Choir. The choir is open to people 
in the Duke and Durham community. The first re- 
hearsal will be on June 15 from 5 :00 to 6 :00 p.m. in 
the Chapel. Anyone interested in auditioning for this 
organization should call 684-3898 for an appoint- 
ment. 



DUKE UNIVERSITY LIBRARY SUMMER 

SESSION SCHEDULE 

June 12 through August 23, 1968 



Perkins Library 
Monday-Friday 
Saturday 
Sunday 



00 a.m.— 10:00 p.m. 
00 a.m. — 6:00 p.m. 
00 p.m. — 6:00 p.m. 



Woman 's College Library 

Monday-Friday 

Saturday 
Sunday 

Closed Garvis, cut this in, please 

Schedules for other campus libraries will be posted. 



8:30 a.m. — 5:00 p.m. 
8:30 a.m. — 1:00 p.m. 



MEDICAL CENTER LIBRARY 
SUMMER HOURS 

!:30 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. 
1:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. 
!:00 noon to 5:00 p.m. 

June 1— September 2, 1968 



Weekdays 

Saturdays 

Sundays 



LOST AND FOUND 
The Information Center, located in the Flowers 
Building Lounge, has a lost and found service. It is 
requested that all lost articles found on campus be 
referred there in order that they may be claimed by 
their owners. 



GOTHIC BOOKSHOP 
The Gothic Bookshop, located by the entrance to 
Page Auditorium, will be open throughout the sum- 
mer, weekdays from 8 :45 a.m. to 5 :00 p.m. and Satur- 
days from 8 :45 a.m. to 1 :00 p.m. Newcomers to cam- 
pus will enjoy browsing in this extremely well-stocked 
book shop. Apart from a fine selection of hard-cover 
books, some 6,000 quality paperbacks are available, as 
well as prints and paintings. 



MEN'S DINING HALLS 
Meal Hours — Summer School — 1968 
The Oak Room will be closed on Saturdays and Sun- 
days. 

Blue and White Boom Oak Boom. 

(Monday-Friday) 
Breakfast 7:00-9:30 Open for Luncheon 

Snack Bar 9:00-11:00 only Monday thru 

Lunch 11:30- 2:00 Friday 

Dinner 5:00- 6:30 11:30-2:00 

University Boom 

Saturday Sunday 

Breakfast 7:00- 9:30 8:30-11:00 
Snack Bar 9:00-11:00 

Lunch 11:30- 1:30 11:30- 1:30 

Dinner 5:00- 6:30 5:00- 6:30 

Although the University Room Cafeteria line will be 
closed Monday thru Friday, there will be access to the 
Air-Conditioned Dining Room. 



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SUMMER SESSION 
RECREATIONAL PROGRAM 

Sports: Badminton, Volleyball, Horseshoe pitch- 
ing, Croquet, and Archery are included in the Recre- 
ation Program. Equipment for these activities is 
available in Card Gymnasium 2:00-5:30 p.m., Monday 
through Friday. In addition to the above program, 
Intramural tournaments will be held for both men 
and women in handball, teunis, Softball, and bad- 
minton. 

Those interested in a fishing spot are requested to 
see Mr. Persons at Card Gymnasium. 

Excellent picnic sites are available. (See special 
notice.) 

The tennis courts are open until 7 :30 p.m. each 
day. 



SUMMER FILM SERIES 
A Film Series will be initiated this summer with 
an opportunity for members of the University and 
community to purchase season tickets for the entire 
six showings of 16mm films or by single admission at 
the door. All showings will be in the Biological 
Sciences Auditorium at 8:00 p.m. Available in Page 
Box Office season tickets are priced at $3.50 for 6 
showings; $1.75 for 3 showings (3 per summer session) 
and $.75 for an individual ticket at the door. The 
schedule of films follows: "King Kong," June 21; 
"Devi," June 28; "The Magnificent Ambersons," 
July 12; "Never Give a Sucker an Even Break," July 
26; "Les Carbiniers," August 9; and "Singin' In the 
Rain," August 16. (Keaton Short each showing). 



ART EXHIBITION 
"CONTEMPORARY PRINTS" 

Members of the Duke University Community are 
invited to visit the West Union Lounge in which is 
hanging an exhibition of original contemporary prints 
on loan from the Ferdinand Roten Galleries, Inc., 
Baltimore, Maryland. 

The exhibition provides a good sampling of the 
various graphic processes and contains works by some 
of the leading printmakers of our time including Ab- 
eles, Bruce Carter, Chagall, Coughlin, Hartigan, 
Siegl, Altman, Jules, and Witebsky. Those wishing 
tn purchase any of the items may make arrangements 
through the Student Activities Office, Room 207 
Flowers Building. The exhibit will hang through the 



first summer session. Those making purchases may 
pick up prints on June 29th at which time a large 
Roten Sales-Exhibition will be held in the West Union 
Lounge. 



11TH ANNUAL PIANO SESSION 

The eleventh annual Duke Piano Sessions is an- 
nounced for July 10th. 11th and 12th. Conducted by 
Loren Withers. Director of Piano Studies, Depart- 
ment of Music, the workshop is a practical refresher 
course for serious teachers and students and offers a 
wide variety of instruction in teaching and perform- 
ing. Full information regarding the session is avail- 
able by calling Professor Withers at 684-2534 or by 
writing to Duke Piano Sessions, Box 6695 College 
Station, Durham, N. C. 27708. 

Two major concerts, open to the public without 
charge, will be presented in Page Auditorium on Tues- 
day, July 10th and Wednesday, July 11th. The young 
artist concert on July 10th will be presented by Yoko 
Nozaki, a former student of Loreu Withers, who has 
now completed her second year of study with Irwin 
Freundlieh at the Juilliard School of Music. Miss 
Nozaki was the unanimous winner of the 1965 
MTNA's pre-college auditions and a year later while 
still in high school she was awarded third prize in 
the National Auditions sponsored by the Friday Morn- 
ing Music Club Foundation in Washington, D. C. 

The second concert (on July 11th) will be pre- 
sented by Jane Carlson, distinguished artist, who 
in addition to her concert activities teaches the piano 
pedagogy courses at the Juilliard School of Music. 
A Naumburg winner she has appeared at Carnegie 
Hall, London's Wigmore Hall, in BBC broadcast re- 
citals and with numerous orchestras here and abroad. 
Paul Hindemith chose her to perform his works in 
concerts which he conducted; her recording of his 
monumental "Ludus Tonalis" will be released soon. 

Other distinguished artist-teachers participating 
in the workshop included : Irwin Freundlieh, a major 
teacher at Juilliard, lecturing on the Suites of Bach ; 
Jane Smisor Bastien and James Bastien, brilliant 
young husband-wife team from New Orleans where 
Mrs. Bastien is Professor of Music at Tulane Univer- 
sity and Mr. Bastien is Professor of Music at Loyola 
University. The Student Section will again be direct- 
ed by Mrs. Sam Troy, one of North Carolina's lead- 
ing private teachers. Professor Withers will, of 
course, be at all sessions and will give performance of 
the NCMTA contest pieces around which many of the 
discussions will revolve. 



IMPORTANT — Notices for the Duke University Calendar should be submitted 

IN WRITTEN FORM to Room 207 Flowers Building, West Campus not later 

than 5:00 p.m., Tuesday. Extension 2911. 



DUKE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION- 
SCHEDULE OF COURSES 
TERM I 

WEST CAMPUS CLASSROOM BUILDINGS 
3. Divinity School 47. Engineering 

5. Language 49. Physics 

6. Chemistry 53. Allen 

9. Psych.-Soc. 58. Biological Sci. 

10. Social Science 

EAST CAMPUS CLASSROOM BUILDINGS 

A. West Duke 

C. Science 

CLASS PERIODS: 

1st period: 7:40- 9:00 



-1968 



2nd period: 
3rd period : 
4th period : 
Course Bldg. & Room 

ANATOMY 

M151 Davison 421 

BOTANY 
Duke Campus 

225 To be arranged 

359 To be arranged 

Marine Lab, Beaufort, N. C. 
207 To be arranged 

225 To be arranged 

359 To be arranged 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 
138 10.220 

146 10.220 

CHEMISTRY (June 18-Julv 18) 
1 Lab 6.109 

Recit. & Lect. 9.133 
61 Lect. & Recit. 10.329 
Lab 6.208 

151 Recit. 9.127 

Lab 6.301 

Lect. 9.127 

275 To be arranged 

CLASSICAL STUDIES— GREEK 



9:20-10:40 
11:00-12:20 
1:40- 3:00 
Period 



To be arranged 
To be arranged 



Instructor 
Bassett 



Staff 
Staff 



To be arranged Johnson 
To be arranged Johnson 
To be arranged Johnson 



3 




Finger 


1 




Finger 


9:30-12:00 




Jones 


12:45- 2:45 






8:30-10:00 




Toren 


10:30-12:00 


an 


d 


1:30- 4:00 






8:00- 9:00 




Brown 


9:00-12:00 






12:00- 1:00 






To be arrang 


ed 


Staff 



121 


5.219 




2 






Truesdale 


122 


5.219 




3 






Truesdale 


COMPARATIVE 


LITERATURE 










191 


To be 


arranged 


To 


be 


arranged 


Salinger 


193 


To be 


arranged 


To 


be 


arranged 


Salinger 


205 


5.014 




3 






Salinger 


DIVINITY SCHOOL 












124 (DS) 


3.319 




2 






Smith 


209 (DS) 


3.319 




3 






Tucker 


277 A 


To be 


arranged 


To 


be 


arranged 


Staff 


ECONOMICS 














51 


10.220 




2 






Crowley 


287 


10.219 




3 






Crowley 


EDUCATION 














201 














(June 12-28) 


53.225 




3 and 


Mon., 










Wed., Fri., 1:30 










3:00 




Petty 


207 


53.318 




3 






C. Johnson 


211 


9.133 




2 






Gehman 


213 


53.316 




3 






Sublett 


232 
233 


10.111 
53.318 




2 
2 






Hurlburt 
Shuman 


237 


53.229 




3 






Shuman 


243 


A. 103 




1 






S. Gehman 


246 














(June 12 29) 


49.124 




3 


Hon 


. thru Sat. 










2:00 3 


:20, Mon. 










thru F 


ri. 


Reynolds 


250, 251 


To be 


arranged 


To 


be 


arranged 


S. Gehman 


253 


53.234 




1 






Bolmeier 


276 


A. 103 




2:00-4 


:00 Mon. 










thru Fri. 


Githens 


315 


10.111 




1 






Hurlburt 


339 


53.316 




2 






Sublett 


ENGINEERING 














CE 365 


To be 


arranged 


To 


be 


arranged 


Staff 


CE 399 


To be 


arranged 


To 


be 


arranged 


Staff 


EE 265 


To be 


arranged 


To 


be 


arranged 


Staff 


EE 399 


To be 


arranged 


To 


be 


arranged 


Staff 


ME 197-198 


To be 


arranged 


To 


be 


arranged 


Staff 


ME 265 


To be 


arranged 


To 


be 


arranged 


Staff 


ME 399 


To be 


arranged 


To 


be 


arranged 


Staff 


ENGLISH 














55 


53.327 




1 






Mellown 


57 


53.388 




2 






Gerber 


129 


53.327 




3 






Smith 


219 


53.326 




3 






Ferguson 


235 


53.326 




2 






Strandberg 


262 


53.327 




2 






Smith 


352 


53.328 




3 






Gohdes 



Course Bldg. & Room Period 

FORESTRY 

357 To be arranged To be arranged 

FRENCH (See Romance Languages) 
GEOLOGY (June 18-July 18) 



Staff 



1 Lect. & 


Carr — 105 


8:00-10:30 


Mon 




Recit. 




thru Fri. 






Lab 




1 :00-4 


00 Mon. 


Heron 






thru Thurs. 






205 (Beaufort) 


To be arranged 


To be 


arran 


ged 


Pilkey 


GERMAN 












1 


5.217 


3 and 
Fri. 


Tues 


. & 








2:00-3 


20 




Boletta 


63 


5.211 


2 






Bessent 


64 


5.208 


3 






Alt 


191 


To be arranged 


To be 


arranged 


Salinger 


193 


To be arranged 


To be 


arran 


ged 


Salinger 


Crad. Reading 












Course 


5.208 


2 






Alt 


GREEK (See Classical Studies) 










HEALTH AND 


PHYSICAL EDUCATION 






PE 182 


Gym (West) 


3 






Davis 


PE 190 


Gym (West) 


1 






Davis 


HISTORY 












51 


53.226 


2 






Gillin 


91 


53.229 


1 






Esthus 


162 


53.233 


3 






Lerner 


216 


53.229 


2 






Esthus 


239 


53.233 


1 






Lerner 


242 


53.226 


3 






Gillin 


301 


53.234 


4 






Fergusor 


MATHEMATICS 












21 


49.124 


2 






Wilkinso 


51 


49.132 


1 






Patrick 


204 


49.124 


1 






Scoville 


213 


49.132 


3 






Hodel 



Conant 



Tice 
Tice 



MYCOLOGY (July 2 to August 2) 

325 To be arranged To be arranged 

PHILOSOPHY 

41 9.129 2 

93 9.129 3 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION (See Health and Physical Education) 
PHYSICS (June 18-July 18) 

41 Lect. & 

Recit, 49.113 

Lab 



353X To be arranged 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 



8:30-9:50 and 
10:10-11:30 daily 

1 :00-4 :00 four Carpenter 
days per week Wheeler 
To be arranged Staff 

Simpson 
Simpson 

(iuttman 

Vogel 

Gehman 

Huse 

Staff 

Bradley 
Kort 
Clark 
Kort 
ROMANCE LANGUAGES— FRENCH 

1 5.208 3 and Mon. & 

Thurs. 2:00-3:20 
63 5.015 2 and Mon. & Thiher 

Thurs. 2:00-3:2OHogsett 
ROMANCE LANGUAGES— SPANISH 



and 



61 


10.119 


3 


125 


10.119 


2 


PSYCHOLOGY 






91 


9.130 


1 


141 


9.127 


2 


211 


9.133 


■2 


232 


9.129 


1 


303 


To be arranged 


T 


RELIGION 






51 


3.220 


1 


55 


3.220 


2 


154 


3.228 


2 


187 


3.220 


3 



To be arranged 



5.211 



RUSSIAN 
1 



191 



(contingent 
on enroll- 
ment) 



5.211 
To be arranged 



1 and Mon. & 

Thurs. 2:00-3:20 Spencer 

1 and Mon. & 

Thurs. 2:00-3:20 Torre 

1 and language 

lab in afternoon Pavlov 

3 and language 

lab in afternoon 

Pavlov 
To be arranged 



SOCIOLOGY AND ANTHROPOLOGY 



91 
153 
253 
ZOOLOGY 

Duke Campus 

353 

Marine Lab, 

Beaufort, 

N. C. 
203 
250 
353 



9.1-33 
9.248 
9.248 



Staff 

Garrity 

Thompson 

Thompson 



To be arranged To be arranged Staff 



To be arranged 
To be arranged 
To be arranged 



To be arranged 
To be arranged 
To be arranged 



Pierce 
Vernberg 

Staff 



Duke University 




June 16-23, 1968 



Sunday, June 16 

8 :30 a.m. Chapel Choir Rehearsal. The Chapel. 

9:00-9:15 a.m. Carillon Recital. Mr. J. Samuel 
Hammond, University Carillonneur. 

9:30 a.m. University Service of "Worship. Univer- 
sity Chapel. Preacher: The Reverend Dr. 
James T. Cleland, Dean of the Chapel and 
James B. Duke Professor of Preaching. Ser- 
mon: "Reflections on Nat Turner.'" Broadcast 
over WDNC and WDNC-FM at 11 :00 a.m. 
10:20 a.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Chal- 
lenges in Education." WCHL Chapel Hill. 
Mrs. Julia Mueller will discuss "A Summer 
Program in Italy." 
11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship broadcast 

over WDNC and WDNC-FM. 
12 noon-10:00 p.m. Student Union Recreational Fa- 
cilities open. 03 Flowers Building Game Room. 

4:00-6:00 p.m. International Open House. 2022 
Campus Drive. 

6:30 p.m. Baha'i Fellowship Meeting. 1903 Essex 
Road. 

8:30 p.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Chal- 
lenges in Education." WPTF Raleigh. Dr. 
Donald E. Stone will discuss "The Importance 
of Tropical Studies." 



Monday, June 17 

June 9th-22nd. Basketball Clinic 
12 noon-10 :00 p.m. Student Union Recreational Fa- 
cilities open. 03 Flowers Building. Game 
Room. 

2 :00-3 :30 p.m. West Campus Pool open for women. 

2 :00-5 :30 p.m. Summer Session Recreational Pro- 
gram. Card Gymnasium. 

4 :25-5 :45 p.m. West Campus Pool open for men. 

7 :00 p.m. International Folk Dancing. International 
House — 2022 Campus Drive. 

8:15-9:30 p.m. West Campus Pool open to faculty 
members and their families. Faculty children 
must be accompanied by their parents. 



Tuesday, June 18 

Instruction begins in 4 s.h. courses of First 
Term in Chemistry, Geology, and Physics. 
12 noon-10 :00 p.m. Student Union Recreational Fa- 
cilities open. 03 Flowers Building. Game 
Room. 

2 :00-3 :30 p.m. West Campus Pool open for women. 

2 :00-5 :30 p.m. Summer Session Recreational Pro- 
gram. Card Gymnasium. 

4:00 p.m. Summer Session Softball League Meeting. 
105 Card Gymnasium. 

4 :25-5 :45 p.m. West Campus Pool open for men. 



Wednesday, June 19 

12 noon-10 :00 p.m. Student Union Recreational Fa- 
cilities open. 03 Flowers Building. Game 
Room. 

2 :00-3 :30 p.m. West Campus Pool open for women. 

2 :00-5 :30 p.m. Summer Session Recreational Pro- 
gram. Card Gymnasium. 

4 :25-5 :45 p.m. West Campus Pool open for men. 

7 :00 and 9 :00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page Au- 
ditorium. "THE TRAIN" with Burt Lancas- 
ter, Paul Scofield, and Jeanne Moreau. "Hair 
trigger suspense. A thriller!" — New York 
Times. "Raises suspense film-making to new 
heights ! ' ' — Cue Magazine. 



Thursday, June 20 

12 noon-10 :00 p.m. Student Union Recreational Fa- 
cilities open. 03 Flowers Building. Game 
Room. 
12:30 p.m. Kappa Delta Pi Meeting. W T est Union 

Ballroom. Speaker : Dr. Joseph Di Bona. 
2 :00-3 :30 p.m. West Campus Pool open for women. 
2 :00-5 :30 p.m. Summer Session Recreational Pro- 
gram. Card Gymnasium. 
4:25-5:45 p.m. West Campus Pool open for men. 



7:00 p.m. Experimental Seminar: "Violence in 
America." Celestial Omnibus. 

8:15-9:30 p.m. West Campus Swimming Pool open 
to faculty members and their families. Fac- 
ulty children will be admitted only when ac- 
companied by their parents. 



Friday, June 21 

Final date for filing intention to complete Mas- 
ter's Degree. Graduate School Office. 
12 noon-10:00 p.m. Student Union Recreational Fa- 
cilities open. 03 Flowers Building. Game 
Room. 

2 :00-3 :30 p.m. West Campus Pool open for women 

2 :00-5 :30 p.m. Summer Session Recreational Pro- 
gram. Card Gymnasium. 

4 :25-5 :45 p.m. West Campus Pool open for men. 

5 :00-6 :00 p.m. Chapel Choir Rehearsal. The Chapel. 

8:00 p.m. Summer Film Series: "King Kong." 
Biological Sciences Auditorium. Tickets: 750 
at door. Season tickets available. 

8:30 p.m. Open House and Dance. Card Gym- 
nasium. 



Saturday, June 22 

9:55 a.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Chal- 
lenges in Education." WDNC Durham. Mrs. 
Julia Mueller will discuss "A Summer Pro- 
gram in Italy." 
12 noon-10:00 p.m. Student Union Recreational Fa- 
cilities open. 03 Flowers Building. Game 
Room. 

2 :00-3 :30 p.m. West Campus Pool open for women. 

4 :25-5 :45 p.m. West Campus Pool open for men. 



Sunday, June 23 

8:30 a.m. Chapel Choir Rehearsal. The Chapel. 
9:00-9:15 a.m. Carillon Recital. Mr. J. Samuel Ham- 
mond, University Carillonneur. 
9 :30 a.m. University Service of Worship. Univer- 
sity Chapel. Preacher : The Reverend Dr. Wil- 
son O. Weldon, Editor, The Upper Room, Nash- 
ville, Tennessee. Broadcast over WDNC and 
WDNC-FM at 11 :00 a.m. 
10:20 a.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Chal- 
lenges in Education." WCHL Chapel Hill. 
Professor Iain Hamilton will discuss "New 
Trends in Opera. ' ' 
11 :00 a.m. University Service of Worship broadcast 
over Radio Station WDNC and WDNC-FM. 



12 noon-10 :00 p.m. Student Union Recreational Fa- 
cilities open. Game Room, 03 Flowers Building. 

4:00-6:00 p.m. International Open House. 2022 
Campus Drive. 

8:30 p.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Chal- 
lenges in Education'" WPTF Raleigh. Mr. 
Carmen Falcone and Mr. Otho Davis will dis- 
cuss "The Thermo-split. " 



CHAPEL ANNOUNCEMENTS 
The Reverend Dr. James T. Cleland, Dean of the 
Chapel and James B. Duke Professor of Preaching, 
will deliver the sermon at the University Service of 
Worship on Sunday, June 16th. Following a pattern 
set during the last five summers, the University Ser- 
vice of Worship during the Summer Session will com- 
mence at 9 :30 a.m. instead of 11 :00 a.m. The service 
will end at 10 :30 a.m., at which time the congregation 
is invited to go directly to the air-conditioned Union 
Ballroom, where coffee will be served, and where an 
hour of informal discussion will take place. 



BAIIA'I FELLOWSHIP MEETING 
The Baha'i Fellowship will meet at the home of 
Mrs. Ludmila Van Sombeek at 1903 Essex Road on 
Sunday, June 16th, at 6 :30 p.m. for prayer and medi- 
tation with music. At 7 :00 p.m. there will be readings 
with discussion on the topic, "The Clouds that Ob- 
scure the Sun of Truth." A fellowship hour, with 
refreshments, will follow. A warm welcome awaits 
all. 



SOFTBALL LEAGUE MEETING 
There will be a Summer Session Softball League 
meeting on Tuesday, June 18th at 4:00 p.m. in Room 
105 Card Gymnasium. Managers or Captains are re- 
quested to be present and, if possible, to have teams 
organized. 



KAPPA DELTA PI MEETING 
The Alpha Tau Chapter of Kappa Delta Pi, honor 
society in education, will hold its first meeting of the 
Summer Session in the West Union Ballroom on 
Thursday, June 20th, at 12:30 p.m. 

Speaker for the occasion will be Dr. Joseph Di 
Bona, Assistant Professor of Education, Duke Uni- 
versity. He will compare student unrest in India 
with that in this country. 



VIOLENCE IN AMERICA SEMINAR 
On Tlrarsday evenings at 7 :00 p.m. in the Celestial 
Omnibus coffee house, there will be an experimental 



(2) 



seminar on "Violence in America." The program 
on Thursday, June 20th, will be given to the histori- 
cal perspective. The following sessions will deal with 
other issues, including: the psychological understand- 
ing of violence ; violence in the education of children ; 
racism and violence ; moral and theological issues re- 
lating to violence ; violence and United States foreign 
policy; and other topics. Sponsored by the Univer- 
sity Christian Movement on campus, the seminar is 
open to all interested persons without charge. 



OPEN HOUSE AND DANCE 
The first dance and open house will be held on Fri- 
day, June 21st at 8:30 p.m. in Card Gymnasium. 
Watch for special announcement. 



NOTICE 
CLASSES WILL NOT MEET ON JULY 4th, 
AND 6th 



5th, 



SUMMER SESSION IDENTIFICATION AND 

ADMISSION CARDS 

Student identification cards may be secured at the 

Summer Session Office. These cards will serve as 

health and recreation cards for the Summer Session. 

Summer Session identification and admission cards 
will be issued to members of the faculty and staff at 
the Summer Session Office, 11!) Allen Building. 



TERM I FINAL EXAMINATION 
SCHEDULE 



Examinations are : 
7:40- 9:00 daily 
1:40- 3:00 daily 
9:20-10:40 daily 

11:00-12:00 daily 



Classes scheduled at : 
Wednesday, July 17, 7:40-10:40 a.m. 
Wednesday, July 17, 1:40-4:40 p.m. 
Wednesday, July 17, 7:00-10:00 p.m. 
Thursday, July 18, 7:40-10:40 a.m. 



The examinations in four-semester hour science 
courses will be held in accordance with a schedule 
arranged by the department concerned. 

Examinations for all short-term courses will be on 
the last scheduled class day. The instructor will make 
the time arrangements. 

All other examinations must be held and taken 
according to the above schedule. 

Any student who desires a report of grades from 
the instructor should leave a self-addressed postal 
card or stamped envelope with the instructor. Grades 
will not be given out orally at the Summer Session 
Office. 



SCHOOL LAW CONFERENCE 
The 15th Annual School Law Conference will meet 
on Tuesday- Wednesday, June 25th-26th. All sessions 
will be held in the Law Building Court Room. 



TOURNAMENTS 
Attention : Tennis, Handball, and Badminton Play- 
ers! Entries (singles and doubles) in tennis, hand- 
ball, and badminton are due by Tuesday, June 25th, 
at 5 :00 p.m. Entries may be made in Room 101 Card 
Gymnasium from 2:00-5:00 p.m. on weekdays. 



SUMMER SESSION RECREATIONAL 
PROGRAM 

Sports: Badminton, Volleyball, Basketball, Horse- 
shoe pitching, Croquet, and Archery are included in 
the Recreation Program. Equipment for these activi- 
ties is available in Card Gymnasium 2:00-5:30 p.m., 
Monday through Friday. In addition to the above 
program, Intramural tournaments will be held for 
both men and women in handball, tennis, softball, and 
badminton. 

Those interested in a fishing spot are requested to 
see Mr. Persons at Card Gymnasium. 

Excellent picnic sites are available. (See special 
notice.) 

The tennis courts are open until 8 :00 p.m. each 
day. 



SWIMMING POOL SCHEDULE 
The swimming pool will be open Monday-Satur- 
day according to the following schedule : 

Women: 2:00-3:30 p.m. 

Men: 4:25-5:45 p.m. 



FACULTY NIGHT 

Monday and Thursday nights : 8 :15-9 :30 p.m. 

Faculty members and their families. Children will 
be admitted only when accompanied by their parents. 

Special Mixed Swimming Parties may be sched- 
uled by student groups on Tuesday, Wednesday, and 
Saturday nights. 



SUMMER FILM SERIES 
A Film Series will be initiated this summer with 
an opportunity for members of the University and 
community to purchase season tickets for the entire 
six showings of 16mm films or by single admission at 
the door. All showings will be in the Biological 
Sciences Auditorium at 8 :00 p.m. Available in Page 
Box Office, season tickets are priced at $3.50 for 6 
showings; $1.75 for 3 showings (3 per summer session) 
and $.75 for an individual ticket at the door. The 
schedule of films follows : 

SUMMER SESSION I 
June 21— KING KONG— (American 1933) 111 Minutes. Star- 
ring Fay Wray, Bruce Cabot, a fifty-foot pre-historic ape, 
and the Empire State Building. NEIGHBORS— Keaton 
Short. 22 Minutes. 



(3) 



June 28— DEVI— (India 1961) 96 Minutes. Director: Satyajit 
Eay; Music: Ali Akbar Khan. A tale of old world super- 
stition colliding with new world realism, of a house divided 
over religion and like Eay 's APU films, done with forceful 
simplicity. A beautiful film. THE HAUNTED HOUSE— 
Keaton Short. 22 Minutes. 

Julv 12— THE MAGNIFICENT AMBERSONS— (American 
1942) 88 Minutes. Director: Orson Welles, Starring Joseph 
Cotten, Agnes Moorehead, Anne Baxter. Welles' imagi- 
nation turns Booth Tarkington 's Pulitzer Prize novel about 
the decline of a mid-western dynasty born in the tradition 
of rugged individualism and faced with changing condi- 
tions of the early part of the century into a film classic 
rich in cinematic invention. THE BOAT — Keaton Short. 
22 Minutes. 

SUMMER SESSION II 

Julv 26— NEVER GIVE A SUCKER AN EVEN BREAK— 
(American) 63 Minutes. Starring W. C. Fields, Gloria 
Jean, Leon Errol. When a famous movie comedian be- 
comes a young girl's guardian, he gets involved in a wild 
mix-up of hectic plane trips and other excitements. COPS — 
Keaton Short. 22 Minutes. 

Aug. 9—LES CARBINIERS — (France 1961) Director: Jean- 
Luc Godard, Starring Anna Karina. "If this is not a 
masterpiece, it will do until one comes along." — Kenneth 
Tynan. THE ELECTRIC HOUSE— Keaton Short. 22 
Minutes. 

Aug. 16— SINGIN' IN THE RAIN— (American 1952) 103 
Minutes. Color. Starring Gene Kelly, Donald O'Connor, 
Debbie Reynolds, Jean Hagen, Cyd Charisse. A charming 
musical which combines nostalgia and sentiment — a spoof 
on the styles and manners of the late 20 's when movies 
were having problems changing to sound. The highpoint 
of the film is the title number danced and sung by Gene 
Kelly. DAYDREAMS— Keaton Short. 22 Minutes. One 
Showing Only. 



RECREATIONAL USE OF DUKE FOREST 
Members of the University Community are invited 
to make use of the Duke Forest for recreational pur- 
poses. 

The Forest rules, which are strictly enforced, are : 

1. No fires of any kind are permitted in the Forest at any time 
except in the grills at the 4 improved picnic sites. 

2. Cars, motorcycles and motor scooters are not allowed within 
the Forest or on the Forest roads except at the 4 improved 
picnic sites. 

3. Gates must not be blocked at any time. The roads are for 
emergency use as well as normal access in the operation of 
the Forest. 

4. No trees, brush or grasses may be cut, scarred, or in any 
way mutilated as such damage will destroy research projects. 

5. Hunting or shooting of fire arms and air rifles are not per- 
mitted. 

The foregoing rules are to protect the large invest- 
ment in time, money, and human energy on research 



projects established within the Duke Forest. 

Recreational use of the Forest in the form of hik- 
ing, picnicking, and fishing is permitted as long as 
the five Forest rules are not violated. 

A picnic site may be reserved and the key checked 
out ($1.00 deposit on key required) at the Duke 
Forest Office in the Biological Sciences Building, 
West Campus — extension 2198. There is no charge for 
the use of the picnic areas. 



ART EXHIBITION 
"CONTEMPORARY PRINTS" 

Members of the Duke University Community are 
invited to visit the West Union Lounge in which is 
hanging an exhibition of original contemporary prints 
on loan from the Ferdinand Roten Galleries, Inc., 
Baltimore, Maryland. 

The exhibition provides a good sampling of the 
various graphic processes and contains works by some 
of the leading printmakers of our time including Ab- 
eles, Bruce Carter, Chagall. Coughlin, Hartigan, 
Siegl, Altman, Jules, and Witebsky. Those wishing 
to purchase any of the items may make arrangements 
through the Student Activities Office, Room 207 
Flowers Building. The exhibit will hang through the 
first summer session. Those making purchases may 
pick up prints on June 29th at which time a large 
Roten Sales-Exhibition will be held in the West Union 
Lounge. 



CANCELLED AFTER PRINTING 

PICNIC CONCERT RESCHEDULED 
"HOLLOW ROCK STRING BAND" 

The opening picnic concert, postponed because of 
rain, has been rescheduled for Wednesday, June 19th, 
from five until seven o'clock in the evening on the 
West Quadrangle. The public is again invited to 
bring picnic suppers and blanket to the concert which 
is open to all without charge. 

The Hollow Rock String Band composed of Duke 
and U.N.C. faculty and graduate students include 
Alan Jabbour, fiddle; Tom Thompson, banjo; Bar- 
bara Thompson, guitar; Eric Olson, banjo and auto 
harp ; Joann Jones, guitar and voice, and Bill Camp, 
square dance caller. Those who heard the group dur- 
ing the Student Union Folk Festival will know what 
a pleasure is in store. 



IMPORTANT— Notices for the Duke University Calendar should be submitted 

IN WRITTEN FORM to Room 207 Flowers Building, West Campus not later 

than 5:00 p.m., Tuesday. Extension 2911. 



Duke University 

HAT FKTnAR J 





.June 23-30, 1968 



Sunday, June 23 

8:30 a.m. Chapel Choir Rehearsal. The Chapel. 
9 :30 a.m. University Service of "Worship. Univer- 
sity Chapel. Preacher : The Reverend Dr. Wil- 
son 0. Weldon, Editor, The Tipper Room, Nash- 
ville, Tennessee. Sermon: "Values United." 
Broadcast over WDNC and WDNC-FM at 
11 :00 a.m. 

10:20 a.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Chal- 
lenges in Education." WCHL Chapel Hill. 
Professor Iain Hamilton will discuss "New 
Trends in Opera. ' ' 

10:30-10:45 a.m. Carillon Recital. Mr. J. Samuel 
Hammond, University Carillonneur. 

11 :00 a.m. University Service of Worship broadcast 
over Radio Station WDNC and WDNC-FM. 

12 noon-10:00 p.m. Student Union Recreational Fa- 
cilities open. Game Room, 03 Flowers Building. 
4:00-6:00 p.m. International Open House. 2022 

Campus Drive. 
8:30 p.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Chal- 
lenges in Education." WPTF Raleigh. Mr. 
Carmen Falcone and Mr. Otho Davis will dis- 
cuss "The Thermo-splint, " 



Monday, June 24 

12 noon-10:00 p.m. Student Union Recreational Fa- 
cilities open. Game Room, 03 Flowers Building. 

2 :00-3 :30 p.m. West Campus Pool open for women. 

2:00-5:30 p.m. Summer Session Recreational Pro- 
gram. Card Gymnasium. 

4:25-5:45 p.m. West Campus Pool open for men. 

7:00 p.m. International Folk Dance. International 
House. 2022 Campus Drive. 

8 :15-9 :30 p.m. West Campus Pool open to faculty 
members and their families. Faculty children 
must be accompanied by their parents. 



Tuesday, June 25 

15th Annual School of Law Conference. Court 
Room, Law School. 
12 noon-10 :00 p.m. Student Union Recreational Fa- 
cilities open. 03 Flowers Building. Game 
Room. 



2 :00-3 :30 p.m. West Campus Pool open for women. 

2 :00-5 :30 p.m. Summer Session Recreational Pro- 
gram. Card Gymnasium. 

4 :25-5 :45 p.m. West Campus Pool open for men. 

5 :00 p.m. Entries in the singles and doubles tour- 
naments for tennis, handball, and badminton 
are due in Room 101 Card Gymnasium. 



Wednesday, June 26 

15th Annual School of Law Conference. Court 
Room, Law School. 
12 noon-10 :00 p.m. Student Union Recreational Fa- 
cilities open. 03 Flowers Building. Game 
Room. 

2 :00-3 :30 p.m. West Campus Pool open for women. 

2 :00-5 :30 p.m. Summer Session Recreational Pro- 
gram. Card Gymnasium. 

4 :25-5 :45 p.m. West Campus Pool open for men. 

7:15 and 9:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page Au- 
ditorium. "A FUNNY THING HAPPENED 
ON THE WAY TO THE FORUM" with Zero 
Mostel, Phil Silvers and Jack Guilford and di- 
rected by Richard Lester. "Rowdy, Bawdy, 
burlesque-type horseplay with expert clowns. 
Stage production brought to screen, complete 
with songs . . ." — Cue Magazine. In color. 



Thursday, June 27 

11 :00 a.m. -6 :00 p.m. Sales Exhibition of Original 
Prints from Roten Galleries. West Union 
Lounge. 
12 noon-10 :00 p.m. Student Union Recreational Fa- 
cilities open. 03 Flowers Building. Game 
Room. 
12:30 p.m. Kappa Delta Pi Meeting. West Union 

Ballroom. Speaker: Dr. Henry Sublett. 
2:00-3:30 p.m. West Campus Pool open for women. 
2:00-5:30 p.m. Summer Session Recreational Pro- 
gram. Card Gymnasium. 
4 :25-5 :45 p.m. West Campus Pool open for men. 
7:00 p.m. Experimental Seminar: "Violence in 
America." Celestial Omnibus. 



8:15-9:30 p.m. West Campus Swimming Pool open 
to faculty members and their families. Fac- 
ulty children will be admitted only when ac- 
companied by their parents. 



Friday, June 28 



12 noon-10:00 p.m. Student Union Recreational Fa- 
cilities open. 03 Flowers Building. Game 
Room. 

1 :00 p.m. N. C. English Teachers Association Sum- 
mer Meeting. Luncheon. West Union Ball- 
room, (see special notice) 

2 :00-3 :30 p.m. West Campus Pool open for women. 

2 :00-5 :30 p.m. Summer Session Recreational Pro- 
gram. Card Gymnasium. 

4 :25-5 :45 p.m. West Campus Pool open for men. 

5 :00-6 :00 p.m. Chapel Choir Rehearsal. The Chapel. 

8:00 p.m. Summer Film Series: "Devi." Biologi- 
cal Sciences Auditorium. Directed by Satyajit 
Ray; Music by Ali Akbar Khan. A tale of old 
world superstition colliding with new world 
realism, of a house divided over religion and 
like Ray's APU films, done with forceful sim- 
plicity. A beautiful film. 



Saturday, June 29 

9:55 a.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Chal- 
lenges in Education." WDNC Durham. Pro- 
fessor Iain Hamilton will discuss "New Trends 
in Opera." 
12 noon-10 :00 p.m. Student Union Recreational Fa- 
cilities open. 03 Flowers Building. Game 
Room. 

2 :00-3 :30 p.m. West Campus Pool open for women. 

4 :25-5 :45 p.m. West Campus Pool open for men. 

8:15 p.m. Duke Entertainment Series: UNC String 
Quartet in Recital. West Union Ballroom. 



Sunday, June 30 

8:30 a.m. Chapel Choir Rehearsal. The Chapel. 
9 :30 a.m. University Service of Worship. Univer- 
sity Chapel. Preacher : The Reverend Dr. How- 
ard C. Wilkinson. Chaplain to the Universitv. 
Broadcast over WDNC and WDNC-FM at 
11 :00 a.m. 

10:20 a.m. Duke Universitv Radio Program, "Chal- 
lenges in Education." WCHL Chapel Hill. 
Professor John Macduff will discuss "Man 
Under Stress." 

10:30-10:45 a.m. Carillon Recital. Mr. J. Samuel 
Hammond, University Carillonneur. 

11 :00 a.m. Universitv Service of Worship broadcast 
over Radio Station WDNC and WDNC-FM. 

12 noon-10 :00 p.m. Student Union Recreational Fa- 
cilities open. 03 Flowers Building. Game Room. 



4:00-6:00 p.m. International Open House. 2022 
Campus Drive. 

8:30 p.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Chal- 
lenges in Education." WPTF Raleigh. Dr. 
George Pearsall will discuss "Deforming Ma- 
terials bv Vibrations." 



CHAPEL ANNOUNCEMENTS 
The Reverend Dr. Wilson O. Weldon, Editor, The 
Upper Room, Nashville, Tennessee, will deliver the 
sermon at the University Service of Worship on Sun- 
day, June 23rd. Following a pattern set during the 
last five summers, the University Service of Worship 
during the Summer Session will commence at 9 :30 
a.m. instead of 11 :00 a.m. The service will end at 
10 :30 a.m., at which time the congregation is invited 
to go directly to the air-conditioned Union Ballroom, 
where coffee will be served, and where an hour of 
informal discussion will take place. 



SCHOOL LAW CONFERENCE 
The 15th Annual School Law Conference will meet 
on Tuesday- Wednesday, June 25th-26th. All sessions 
will be held in the Law Building Court Room. 



ART EXHIBITION 
"CONTEMPORARY PRINTS" 

Members of the Duke University Community are 
invited to visit the West Union Lounge in which is 
hanging an exhibition of original contemporary prints 
on loan from the Ferdinand Roten Galleries, Inc., 
Baltimore. Maryland. 

The exhibition provides a good sampling of the 
various graphic processes and contains works by some 
of the leading printmakers of our time including Ab- 
eles, Bruce Carter, Chagall, Coughlin, Hartigan, 
Siegl. Altman. Jules, and Witebsky. Those wishing 
to purchase any of the items may make arrangements 
through the Student Activities Office, Room 207 
Flowers Building. The exhibit will hang through the 
first summer session. 

Those making purchases may pick up prints on 
Thursday. June 27th, at which time a large Roten 
Sales-Exhibition will be held in the West Union 
Lounge. 



SALES-EXHIBITION OF ORIGINAL 
PRINTS— ROTEN GALLERIES 

An exhibit of original prints by classic and con- 
temporary artists will be presented by Ferdinand 
Roten Galleries of Baltimore, Maryland, in the West 
Union Lounge. This exhibition, under the auspices 
of the Student Activities Office, will be held on Thurs- 
day, June 27th, from 11 :00 a.m.-6 :00 p.m. 

Priced from $5 through $100, the exhibit includes 
approximately 1000 original etchings, lithographs 
and woodcuts by such artists as Picasso, Chagall, 
Miro. Renoir. Goya, Baskin, Kollwitz and many 
others. Also on display will be a collection of out- 



(2) 



standing Western and Oriental manuscript pages 
from works of the 13th-20th centuries. 

A representative of the Roten Galleries, Mr. Harry 
Westlund, will be present at the exhibition to answer 
any questions the public may have regarding graphic 
art and printmaking. 

Established in 1932. Roten Galleries has one of 
the largest collections of graphic art in the country. 
The firm operates its main gallery at 123 West Mul- 
berry Street. Baltimore, and specializes in arranging 
exhibitions and sales of original graphics at colleges, 
universities and museums throughout the country. 



KAPPA DELTA PI 
LUNCHEON MEETING 

The Alpha Tan Chapter of Kappa Delta Pi, honor 
society in education, will hold its second luncheon 
meeting of the Summer Session in the West Union 
Ballroom on Thursday, June 27th, at 12:30 p.m. 

Speaker for the occasion will be Dr. Henry Sub- 
lett of the Education Department. He will speak on 
"From the Revolution to the Civil War: An Active 
Inactive Period in Virginia Educational History. " 



VIOLENCE IN AMERICA 
Dr. Sidney Nathans of the History Department 
will lead a Seminar on Violence in America on Thurs- 
day, June 27th. The regular time is 7 :00 p.m. ; the 
place is the Celestial Omnibus coffee house. Dr. 
Nathans will focus on that violent aspect of the 
American tradition, that tendency toward the use of 
violence which has always been a part of the Ameri- 
can way of handling things. The following session, 
July 11th, will focus on the role of the Mass Media 
in the issue of violence. Participants that evening 
may include Dr. Henry Clark and an editor of The 
North Carolina, Anvil. Mr. Robert Burns. On July 
18th. the seminar will center on "Death at an Early 
Age," the life of a ghetto child in school, and the full 
panoply of violations committed against many chil- 
dren by the structures of the educational system. 
Evervone is invited to this seminar. 



NCETA SUMMER MEETING 
The North Carolina English Teachers Association 
will hold its annual summer meeting jointly at Duke 
University and at the University of North Carolina 
at Chapel Hill on Friday and Saturday, June 28th- 
29th. Announced events at Chapel Hill include regis- 
tration, a morning and an evening session on Friday 
and a Saturday morning business session, all center- 
ing around Peabody Hall, Room 208. 

On Friday at 1 :00 p.m. the annual luncheon will 
be held in the Duke West Union Ballroom with Pro- 
fessor George W. Williams, of the Duke English De- 
partment, as speaker. Dr. William's topic will be 
"The Teaching of Shakespeare." Immediately fol- 
lowing the luncheon, the afternoon session will meet 
in Room 136 Social Science Building. At this time 
members of the English Department will discuss in- 



formally the considerations that led to a reduction 
of the requirement in Freshman English from two 
semesters to one. 

Reservations for the Friday luncheon, at $1.75 
per person, can be accepted through June 23rd. 
NCETA members should send reservations to Dr. 
John D. Ebba, Executive Secretary, East Carolina 
University, Box 2485, Greenville, North Carolina 
2783L Non-members in the Duke community may 
send reservations to Francis E. Bowman, English 
Department, a member of the Duke committee on 
local arrangements. Other members of the local com- 
mittee are Gerald E. Gerber of the English Depart- 
ment and R. Baird Shuman of the Education De- 
partment. 



VOLUNTEERS NEEDED 
Attention Students, faculty, skilled and semi- 
skilled employees over 60 years old : Volunteers are 
needed by the Center for the Study of the Aging for 
a simple learning and forgetting study. No medical 
examination, drugs, or physical measures. The study 
will require about two hours and can be arranged to fit 
individual schedules — weekends, evenings, etc. Pay- 
ment is $5.00 for participation. Please call Extension 
3362 for an appointment or more information. 



SUMMER FILM SERIES 
A Film Series will be initiated this summer with 
an opportunity for members of the University and 
community to purchase season tickets for the entire 
six showings of 16mm films or by single admission at 
the door. All showings will be in the Biological 
Sciences Auditorium at 8 :00 p.m. Available in Page 
Box Office season tickets are priced at $3.50 for 6 
showings ; $1.75 for 3 showings (3 per summer session) 
and $.75 for an individual ticket at the door. The 
schedule of films follows: "King Kong," June 21; 
"Devi," June 28; "The Magnificent Ambersons," 
July 12; "Never Give a Sucker an Even Break," July 
26; "Les Carbiniers," August 9; and "Singin' In the 
Rain," August 16. (Keaton Short each showing). 



CELESTIAL OMNIBUS 
The only coffee house on the campus — the only one 
in town: The Celestial Omnibus. Located under 
Flowers Lounge, the CO. is open six nights weekly, 
including Sunday. Serving not only several coffees 
and teas, but also ice cream, cakes, a few sandwiches 
and soft drinks, the CO. provides atmosphere. Also 
provided are recorded and occasional live music pro- 
grams, regular free flicks of an artsy and documentary 
nature, plus other kinds of entertainment — i.e. the 
Hollow Rock String Band in rehearsal. And for those 
who need a platform, the policy is Open Stage ; bring 
down your guitar or lute or recorder or poems or 
stories or films, etc. On Thursday nights at 7 :00 p.m., 
the experimental seminar on Violence in America 
goes on. Other nights, the CO. is open from 8 :00 
until midnight. 



(3) 



DUKE ENTERTAINMENT SERIES 
UNC STRING QUARTET IN RECITAL 

The University of North Carolina String Quartet 
will be presented in recital by the Duke University 
Summer Entertainment Series on Saturday, June 
29th. The program, which will be given in the air- 
conditioned West Union Ballroom at 8 :15 p.m., will 
feature works by Beethoven, Schubert, Tschaikovsky, 
and Dvorak. The concert is open to the public with- 
out charge. 

The quartet is comprised of four talented musi- 
cians, two of whom are members of the University of 
North Carolina Music Department faculty. They 
are Dr. Edgar Alden, first violinist and professor of 
Music Theory and Musieology, and Charles Griffith. 
an Instructor in Cello and Music Appreciation sub- 
jects. Mr. Griffith, the youngest member of the group, 
joined the quartet as cellist in 1964. He is a gradu- 
ate of the Oberlin College Conservatory and took 
advanced training with the eminent cellist Leonard 
Rose. Dr. Alden founder of the quartet, and his wife 
Dorothy Alden, a violist, also studied at Oberlin. A 
retired Air Force Lieutenant Colonel, Earl Wolslagel 
is second violinist. A UNC alumnus, he took his musi- 
cal training at Juilliard with the late Vera Fonaroff 
and Leopold Auer, and in Vienna with Geza de 
Kresz. A charter member of the North Carolina Sym- 
phony, Colonel Wolslagel retired to Chapel Hill in 
1962 after more than twenty years of active duty 
and is presently a staff member of the Duke Informa- 
tion Services. 

The quartet's program is designed for "easy 
summertime listening pleasure," according to Dr. 
Alden. and will include : 

Quartet in G major, Op. 18, No. 2 Beethoven 

Allegro 

Adagio cantabile : Allegro 

Scherzo : Allegro 

Allegro molto quasi presto 

Quartet-Satz in C minor Schubert 

Allegro assai 

Andante cantabile from 

Quartet, Op. 11 Tchaikovsky 

Quartet in F major ("American"), 

Op. 96 Dvorak 

Allegro ma non troppo 

Lento 

Molto vivace 

Finale : Vivace ma non troppo 



LIBRARY SCHEDULE JULY 4-7, 1968 



"Wednesday, July 3 
Thursday, July 4 
Friday, July 5 
Saturday, July 6 
Sunday, July 7 
Monday, July 8 



8 :00 a.m.-6 :00 p.m. 

Closed 

8:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. 

8 :00 a.m.-l :00 p.m. 

Closed 

Resume summer schedide. 



Note : All campus libraries will be closed on July 4. 



NOTICE 

CLASSES WILL NOT MEET ON 

JULY 4th, 5th, AND 6th 

TERM II REGISTRATION 

Students who have pre-enrolled for Term II are 
urged to complete the entire process of registration 
between the hours of 9 :30 a.m. and 12 :00 noon and 
2 :00 p.m. to 4 :00 p.m. in the Summer Session Office, 
Room 119 Allen Building, between July 8th and 
July 15th. 

Those students who have not pre-enrolled for 
Term II are urged to do so with their respective 
schools or colleges and then complete the registra- 
tion as announced above. 

The Graduate School will accept registrants dur- 
ing the same hours and on the same dates as indi- 
cated above for the Summer Session Office. 

Students who complete their registration will not 
be required to appear on Registration Dav, Fridav, 
July 19th. 

TERM I FINAL EXAMINATION SCHEDULE 



Classes scheduled at: 
7:40- 9:00 daily 
1:40- 3:00 daily 
9:80-10:40 daily 

11:00-12:20 daily 



Examinations are: 

Wednesday, July 17, 7:40-10:40 a.m. 
Wednesday, July 17, 1:40- 4:40 p.m. 
Wednesday, July 17, 7:00-10:00 p.m. 
Thursday, July 18, 7:40-10:40 a.m. 



The examinations in four-semester hour science 
courses will be held in accordance with a schedule 
arranged by the department concerned. 

Examinations for all short-term courses will be 
on the last scheduled class day. The instructor will 
make the time arrangements. 

All other examinations must be held and taken 
according to the above schedule. 

Any student who desires a report of grades from 
the instructor should leave a self-addressed postal 
card or stamped envelope with the instructor. Grades 
will not be given out orally at the Summer Session 
Office. 



IMPORTANT — Notices for the Duke University Calendar should be submitted 

IN WRITTEN FORM to Room 207 Flowers Building, West Campus not later 

than 5:00 p.m., Tuesday. Extension 2911. 



Duke University 

HAT FKTnAR J 




.June 30-July 7, 1968 



Sunday, June 30 

8:30 a.m. Chapel Choir Rehearsal. The Chapel. 
9:30 a.m. University Service of Worship. Univer- 
sity Chapel. Preacher : The Reverend Dr. 
Howard C. Wilkinson, Chaplain to the Uni- 
versity. Sermon: "Has the Bottom Dropped 
Out of Everything?" Broadcast over WDNC 
and WDNC-FM at 11 :00 a.m. 

10:20 a.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Chal- 
lenges in Education." WCHL Chapel Hill. 
Professor John Macduff will discuss "Man 
Under Stress." 

10:30-10:45 a.m. Carillon Recital. Mr. J. Samuel 
Hammond, University Carillonneur. 

11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship broadcast 
over Radio Station WDNC and WDNC-FM. 

12 noon-10:00 p.m. Student Union Recreational Fa- 
cilities open. 03 Flowers Building. Game Room. 
4:00-6:00 p.m. International Open House. 2022 

Campus Drive. 
8:30 p.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Chal- 
lenges in Education." WPTF Raleigh. Dr. 
George Pearsall will discuss "Deforming Ma- 
terials by Vibrations." 



Monday, July 1 



12 noon-10:00 p.m. Student Union Recreational Fa- 
cilities open. Game Room, 03 Flowers Building. 

2 :00-3 :30 p.m. West Campus Pool open for women. 

2:00-5:30 p.m. Summer Session Recreational Pro- 
gram. Card Gymnasium. 

4:25-5:45 p.m. West Campus Pool open for men. 

5:30 p.m. Summer Session Softball League Games. 

7 :00 p.m. International Folk Dance. International 
House. 2022 Campus Drive. 

7:30-10:00 p.m. Scottish Folk Dancing. Presby- 
terian Student Center. Alexander Avenue. 

8:15-9:30 p.m. West Campus Pool open to faculty 
members and their families. Faculty children 
must be accompanied by their parents. 



July 



Tuesday, July 2 

(Tuesday-Saturday) Medical Mycology 



2-27 
Course. 

12 noon-10:00 p.m. Student Union Recreational Fa- 
cilities open. 03 Flowers Building. Game 
Room. 



2 :00-3 :30 p.m. West Campus Pool open for women. 
2:00-5:30 p.m. Summer Session Recreational Pro- 
gram. Card Gymnasium. 
4 :25-5 :45 p.m. West Campus Pool open for men. 
5:30 p.m. Summer Session Softball League Games. 

Wednesday, July 3 

12 noon-10 :00 p.m. Student Union Recreational Fa- 
cilities open. 03 Flowers Building. Game 
Room. 

2:00-3:30 p.m. West Campus Pool open for women. 

2 :00-5 :30 p.m. Summer Session Recreational Pro- 
gram. Card Gymnasium. 

4 :25-5 :45 p.m. West Campus Pool open for men. 

5 :30 p.m. Summer Session Softball League Games. 

7 :00 and 9 :00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page Au- 
ditorium. No Film. 

Thursday, July 4 

All Campus Libraries will be closed today. 

2 :00-3 :30 p.m. West Campus Pool open for women. 

2 :00-5 :30 p.m. Summer Session Recreational Pro- 
gram. Card Gymnasium. 

4:25-5:45 p.m. West Campus Pool open for men. 

5 :30 p.m. Summer Session Softball League Games. 

8:15-9:30 p.m. West Campus Swimming Pool open 
to faculty members and their families. Fac- 
ulty children will be admitted only when ac- 
companied by their parents. 



Friday, July 5 



2 :00-3 :30 p.m. West Campus Pool open for women. 
2 :00-5 :30 p.m. Summer Session Recreational Pro- 
gram. Card Gymnasium. 
4 :25-5 :45 p.m. West Campus Pool open for men. 
5 :30 p.m. Summer Session Softball League Games. 
6 :00-7 :00 p.m. Chapel Choir Rehearsal. The Chapel. 

Saturday, July 6 

9:55 a.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Chal- 
lenges in Education." WDNC Durham. Pro- 
fessor John Macduff will discuss "Man Under 
Stress." 

2 :00-3 :30 p.m. West Campus Pool open for women. 

4 :25-5 :45 p.m. West Campus Pool open for men. 



Sunday, July 7 



8 :30 a.m. Chapel Choir Rehearsal. The Chapel. 
9 :30 a.m. University Service of Worship. Univer- 
sity Chapel. Preacher : Dr. Albert N. Whiting. 
President, North Carolina College. Broadcast 
over WDXC and WDXC-FM at 11 :00 a.m. 
10:20 a.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Chal- 
lenges in Education'" WCHL Chapel Hill. 
Dr. Henry Hellmers will discuss "Investiga- 
tions at a Phvtotron." 
10:30-10:45 a.m. Carillon Recital. Mr. J. Samuel 

Hammond, University Carillonneur. 
11 :00 a.m. University Service of Worship broadcast 

over Radio Station WDXC and WDXC-FM. 
4:00-6:00 p.m. International Open House. 2022 

Campus Drive. 
8:30 p.m. Duke University Radio Program. "Chal- 
lenges in Education."" WPTF Raleigh. Mrs. 
Julia Mueller will discuss "A Summer Pro- 
gram in Italy." 



UNIVERSITY SERVICE OF WORSHIP 
The Reverend Dr. Howard C. Wilkinson, Chap- 
lain to the University, will deliver the sermon at the 
University Service of Worship on Sunday. June 30th. 
Following a pattern set during the last five summers, 
the University Service of Worship during the Sum- 
mer Session will commence at 9 :30 a.m. instead of 
11:00 a.m. The service will end at 10:30 a.m., at 
which time the congregation is invited to go directly 
to the air-conditioned Union Ballroom, where coffee 
will be served, and where an hour of informal dis- 
cussion will take place. 



DINING HALL SCHEDULE 
The Blue and White Room and the Oak Room in 

the West Campus Union Building will be closed on 

July 4, 5, 6. and 7. 

The University Room will be open on those days 

and will observe Sunday hours on Thursday, July 4th. 



1968 SUMMER SESSION SOFTBALL 
LEAGUE 



Date: 

Monday, July 1st 

Tuesday. July 2nd 



(first term) 
Game : 

Bye vs. Immunology 
Biology vs. Economics 
Chemistry Blue vs. Forestry 
Rebels vs. Physics 
Chemistry White vs. Soci- 
ology 
AROD vs. Biochemistry 

Wednesday, July 3rd Chemistry White vs. AROD 
Rebels vs. Biochemistry 
Chemistry Blue vs. Sociology 
Biology vs. Physics 

Thursday. July 4th Bye vs. Economics 

Immunology vs. Forestry 

Special Notice 
Most games will be played on Tuesday and Thurs- 



day with the starting time at 5 :30 p.m. All rain-out 
games will be played the following Monday and Fri- 
day when possible. Physics games will be played at 
4 :30 when possible. 



SCOTTISH DANCING THROUGH 
SUMMER SCHOOL 

The Duke Scottish Dancers invite anyone in- 
terested to watch or join their weekly dances, held 
every Monday evening in the air-conditioned Presby- 
terian Student Center on Alexander Avenue (just 
off Campus Drive). 

Beginners instruction by Dick and Suzanne Con- 
nett is at 7 :30 p.m. General dancing continues until 
10:00 p.m. Light-weight shoes would be helpful. 



NOTICE 
CLASSES WILL NOT MEET ON JULY 4th, 5th, 

AND 6th 
TERM I FINAL EXAMINATION SCHEDULE 



Classes scheduled at : 
7:40- 9:00 daily 
1:40- 3:00 dailv 
9:20-10:40 daily 

11:00-12:20 daily 



Examinations are: 

Wednesday, July 17, 7:40-10:40 a.m. 
Wednesday, July 17, 1:40-4:40 p.m. 
Wednesday, July 17, 7:00-10:00 p.m. 
Thursday, July IS, 7:40-10:40 a_m. 



The examinations in four-semester hour science 
courses will be held in accordance with a schedule ar- 
ranged by the department concerned. 

Examinations for all short-term courses will be on 
the last scheduled class day. The instructor will make 
the time arrangements. 

All other examinations must be held and taken 
according to the above schedule. 

Any student who desires a report of grades from 
the instructor should leave a self-addressed postal 
card or stamped envelope with the instructor. Grades 
will not be given out oralhi at the Summer Session 
Office. 

TERM II REGISTRATION 
Students who have pre-enrolled for Term II are 

urged to complete the entire process of registration 

between the hours of 9:30 a.m. and 12:00 noon and 

2:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. in the Summer Session Office. 

Room 119. Allen Building, between July 8th and 

July loth. 

Those students who have not pre-enrolled for 

Term II are urged to do so with their respective 

schools or colleges and then complete the registration 

as announced above. 

Students who complete their registration will not 

be required to appear on Registration Day, Friday, 

July 19th. 

MAJOR EXAMINATION FOR M.Ed 
DEGREE 

The major examination for candidates for the 
M.Ed, degree without thesis will be held on Wednes- 
day. July 10th, iu Room 124, Allen Building, at 1 :00 
p.m. 



IMPORTANT— Notices for the Duke University Calendar should be submitted 

IN WRITTEN FORM to Room 207 Flowers Building, West Campus not later 

than 5:00 p.m., Tuesday. Extension 2911. 



Duke University 

~ALENDAFT 







.July 7-14, 1968 



Sunday, July 7 



8 :30 a.m. Chapel Choir Rehearsal. The Chapel. 
9 :30 a.m. University Service of Worship. Univer- 
sity Chapel. Preacher : Dr. Albert N. Whiting, 
President, North Carolina College. Sermon : 
"A New Heaven and A New Earth." Broad- 
east over WDNC and WDNC-FM at 11 :00 a.m. 

10:20 a.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Chal- 
lenges in Education." WCHL Chapel Hill. 
Dr. Henry Hellmers will discuss "Investiga- 
tions at a Phytotron. " 

10:30-10:45 a.m. Carillon Recital. Mr. J. Samuel 
Hammond, University Carillonneur. 

11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship broadcast 
over Radio Station WDNC and WDNC-PM. 

12:00 noon-10:00 p.m. Student Union Recreational 
Facilities open. Game Room, 03 Flowers 
Building. 
4:00-6:00 p.m. International Open House. 2022 
Campus Drive. 

p.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Chal- 
lenges in Education. WPTF Raleigh. Mrs. 
Julia Mueller will discuss "A Summer Pro- 
gram in Italy." 



8:30 



Monday, July 8 



July 8-August 2 (Monday-Friday) The Methodist 

Course of Study School. 
12:00 noon-10:00 p.m. Student Union Recreational 
Facilities open. Game Room, 03 Flowers 
Building. 

2 :00-3 :30 p.m. West Campus Pool open for women. 

2:00-5:30 p.m. Summer Session Recreational Pro- 
gram. Card Gymnasium. 

3 :30 p.m. Chemistry Seminar. 126 Psychology- 
Sociology Building. Speaker: Dr. Gurnos 
Jones. 

4:25-5:45 p.m. West Campus Pool open for men. 

5:30 p.m. Summer Session Softball League Games. 

7 :00 p.m. International Folk Dance. International 
House. 2022 Campus Drive. 

7 :30-10 :00 p.m. Scottish Folk Dancing. Presbyter- 
ian Student Center. Alexander Avenue. 

8 :15-9 :30 p.m. West Campus Pool open to faculty 
members and their families. Faculty children 
must be accompanied by their parents. 



Tuesday, July 9 



10 :00 a.m. The final examination of Mr. James Rich- 
ard Leutze for the Ph.D. degree in History. 
Room 234 Allen Building. 
12:00 noon-10:00 p.m. Student Union Recreational 
Facilities open. Game Room, 03 Flowers 
Building. 

p.m. The final examination of Mr. Alden Brynn 
Pearson, Jr. for the Ph.D. degree in History. 
Room 234 Allen Building. 

-3 :30 p.m. West Campus Pool open for women. 

-5:30 p.m. Summer Session Recreational Pro- 
gram. Card Gymnasium. 

-5:45 p.m. West Campus Pool open for men. 
p.m. Summer Session Softball League Games, 
p.m. Duplicate Bridge Tournament. West 
Union Ballroom. 

p.m. Pinter Play Reading Circle. Celestial 
Omnibus. 



2:00 



2:00- 
2:00- 

4:25- 
5:30 
7:30 

8:30 



9:30 
12:00 

1:30 

2:00 
2:00 

4:25 

5:30 
7:00 

8:15 



Wednesday, July 10 

a.m. -12 :00 noon 11th Annual Piano Sessions. 
Auditorium, Engineering Building. 
noon-10:00 p.m. Student Union Recreational 
Facilities open. Game Room, 03 Flowers 
Building. 
4:00 p.m. 
ditorium, 
3:30 p.m. 
5:30 p.m. 



Au- 



11th Annual Piano Sessions. 

Engineering Building. 

West Campus Pool open for women. 
Summer Session Recreational Pro- 
gram. Card Gymnasium. 
5 :45 p.m. West Campus Pool open for men. 
p.m. Summer Session Softball League Games, 
and 9 :00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page Au- 
ditorium. No film. 

p.m. Concert: Yoko Nozaki, Student, The Juil- 
liard School of Music. Page Auditorium. 



Thursday, July 11 

9 :30 a.m.-12 :00 noon 11th Annual Piano Sessions. 
Auditorium, Engineering Building. 
12:00 noon-10:00 p.m. Student Union Recreational 
Facilities open. Game Room, 03 Flowers 
Building. 



12 :30 



1 :30- 

2:00 
2:00 

4:25 
5:30 
7:00 

8:15 

8:15- 



p.m. Kappa Delta Pi Luncheon Meeting. 
Gothic Dining Hall. Speaker: Dr. R. Baird 
Slmman. Topic: "Censorship of High School 
Reading. ' ' 

4:00 p.m. 11th Annual Piano Sessions. Au- 
ditorium, Engineering Building. 
3 :30 p.m. "West Campus Pool open for women. 
5 :30 p.m. Summer Session Recreational Pro- 
gram. Card Gymnasium. 
5 :45 p.m. "West Campus Pool open for men. 
p.m. Summer Session Softball League Games, 
p.m. Experimental Seminar: "Violence in 
America." Celestial Omnibus, 
p.m. Concert : Jane Carlson, pianist. Page Au- 
ditorium. 

9 :30 p.m. West Campus Pool open to faculty- 
members and their families. Faculty children 
must be accompanied by their parents. 



Sunday, July 14 



Friday, July 12 



9 :30 a.m.-12 :00 noon 11th Annual Piano Sessions. 
Auditorium, Engineering Building. 
12 :00 noon-10 :00 p.m. Student Union Recreational 
Facilities open. Game Room, 03 Flowers 
Building. 

2:00-3:30 p.m. West Campus Pool open for women. 

2 :00-5 :30 p.m. Summer Session Recreational Pro- 
gram. Card Gymnasium. 

3 :30 p.m. Chemistry Seminar. 126 Psychology- 
Sociology Building. Speaker: Professor V. M. 
Clark. 

5:30 p.m. Summer Session Softball League Games. 

6:00-7:00 p.m. Chapel Choir Rehearsal. The 
Chapel. 

8:00 p.m. Summer Film Series: "The Magnificent 
Ambersons. " Biological Sciences Auditorium. 
(American 1942) 88 Minutes. Director: Orson 
"Welles, Starring Joseph Gotten, Agnes Moore- 
head, Anne Baxter. Welles' imagination turns 
Booth Tarkington's Pullitzer Prize novel about 
the decline of a mid-western dynasty born in 
the tradition of rugged individualism and 
faced with changing conditions of the early 
part of the century into a film classic rich in 
cinematic invention. THE BOAT — Keaton 
Short, 22 Minutes. 

8 :30 and 10 :00 p.m. Poetry Reading : Jerry Eidenier 
reading from his own works. Celestial Omni- 
bus. 



Saturday, July 13 

9:55 a.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Chal- 
lenges in Education." WDNC Durham. Dr. 
Henry Hellmers will discuss "Investigations 
at a Phytotron. " 
12 :00 noon-10 :00 p.m. Student LTnion Recreational 
Facilities open. Game Room, 03 Flowers 
Building. 

2 :00-3 :30 p.m. West Campus Pool open for women. 

4 :25-5 :45 p.m. West Campus Pool open for men. 



8 :30 a.m. Chapel Choir Rehearsal. The Chapel. 
9:30 a.m. University Service of Worship. Univer- 
sity Chapel. Preacher: The Reverend Dr. 
James T. Cleland, Dean of the Chapel and 
James B. Duke Professor of Preaching. Broad- 
cast over WDNC and WDNC-FM at 11 :00 a.m. 

10:20 a.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Chal- 
lenges in Education." WCHL Chapel Hill. 
Dr. Robert Krueger will discuss "Education: 
Tailor-made." 

10:30-10:45 a.m. Carillon Recital. Mr. J. Samuel 
Hammond, University Carillonneur. 

11 :00 a.m. University Service of Worship broadcast 
over Radio Station WDNC and WDNC-FM. 

12:00 noon-10 :00 p.m. Student Union Recreational 
Facilities open. Game Room, 03 Flowers 
Building. 
4:00-6:00 p.m. International Open House. 2022 

Campus Drive. 
8:30 p.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Chal- 
lenges in Education." WPTF Raleigh. Pro- 
fessor Iain Hamilton will discuss ' ' New Trends 
in Opera. ' ' 



UNIVERSITY SERVICE OF WORSHIP 
Dr. Albert N. Whiting, President, North Carolina 
College, will deliver the sermon at the University 
Service of Worship on Sunday, July 7th. Following 
a pattern set during the last five summers, the Uni- 
versity Service of Worship during the Summer Ses- 
sion will commence at 9 :30 a.m. instead of 11 :00 a.m. 
The service will end at 10:30 a.m., at which time the 
congregation is invited to go directly to the air-con- 
ditioned Union Ballroom, where coffee will be served 
and where an hour of informal discussion will take 
place. 



CHEMISTRY SEMINAR 
The Chemistry Seminar will meet on Monday, 
July 8th, at 3:30 p.m. in Room 126 Psychology-So- 
ciology Building. Dr. Gurnos Jones, Reader in Or- 
ganic Chemistry, University of Keele, Keele, Stafford- 
shire, England will present a seminar on "Azonia- 
Azulenium Salts. ' ' Refreshments will be served in 
the lobby of the Chemistry Building at 3 :00 p.m. All 
interested persons are cordially invited to attend. 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. James Richard 
Leutze for the Ph.D. degree in History will be held 
on Tuesday, July 9th at 10:00 a.m. in Room 234 
Allen Building. The subject of Mr. Leutze 's dis- 
sertation is "If Britain Should Fall: Roosevelt And 
Churchill And British- American Naval Relations: 
1938-1940." 

The committee to conduct the examination consists 
of Professors Richard L. Watson, Jr., Theodore Ropp, 
William E. Scott and Bernard I. Duffey. Professor 
Watson will preside. 



(2) 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. Alden Bryan Pear- 
son, Jr. for the Ph.D. degree in History will be held 
on Tuesday, July 9th at 2:00 p.m. in Room 234 Allen 
Building. The subject of Mr. Pearson's dissertation 
is "The American Press And The Sino- Japanese 
Crisis Of 1931-1933 : An Aspect Of Public Response 
To The Breakdown Of AVorld Peace." 

The committee to conduct the examination consists 
of Professors Calvin D. Davis, Donald Gillin, Richard 
Watson and Robert R. Wilson. Professor Davis will 
preside. 



BRIDGE TOURNAMENT 
A duplicate bridge tournament will be held at 
7 :30 p.m. on Tuesday, July 9th in the air-conditioned 
Union Ballroom. All members of the university com- 
munity are invited to attend. 



PINTER PLAY READING CIRCLE 
On Tuesday, July 9th, at 8 :30 p.m., a play reading 
circle is being organized to read the drama of Harold 
Pinter. The leading British dramatist, Pinter's plays 
including The Caretaker and The Homecoming, have 
been Broadway successes. This new group will meet 
in the Celestial Omnibus coffee house each Tuesday 
during the Summer Sessions. All those interested are 
invited. No dramatic talent is required. Readings 
will be done of Pinter's major plays as well as his 
shorter and lesser known works. 



11TH ANNUAL PIANO SESSIONS 
The eleventh annual Duke Piano Sessions is an- 
nounced for July 10th, 11th and 12th. Conducted by 
Loren Withers, Director of Piano Studies, Depart- 
ment of Music, the workshop is a practical refresher 
course for serious teachers and students and offers a 
wide variety of instruction in teaching and perform- 
ing. Full information regarding the session is avail- 
able by calling Professor Withers at 684-2534 or by 
writing to Duke Piano Sessions, Box 6695 College 
Station, Durham, N. C. 27708. 

Two major concerts, open to the public without 
charge, will be presented in Page Auditorium on Tues- 
day, July 10th and Wednesday, July 11th. The young 
artist concert on July 10th will be presented by Yoko 
Nozaki. The second concert (on July 11th) will be 
presented by Jane Carlson, distinguished artist. 

Other distinguished artist-teachers participating 
in the workshop included: Irwin Freundlich, a major 
teacher at Juilliard, lecturing on the Suites of Bach ; 
Jane Smisor Bastien and James Bastien, brilliant 
young husband-wife team from New Orleans where 
Mrs. Bastien is Professor of Music at Tulane Univer- 
sity and Mr. Bastien is Professor of Music at Loyola 
University. The Student Section will again be direct- 
ed by Mrs. Sam Troy, one of North Carolina's lead- 
ing private teachers. Professor Withers will, of 
course, be at all sessions and will give performance of 



the NCMTA contest pieces around which many of the 
discussions will revolve. 



PIANO RECITAL 
YOKO NOZAKI 
Pianist Yoko Nozaki will appear in a recital in 
Page Auditorium on Wednesday, July 10th, at 8 :15 
p.m. The public is invited to the recital which is 
sponsored jointly by Loren Withers' Piano Workshop 
and the Duke Summer Entertainment Series. In 
1965 Miss Nozaki won the National High School Au- 
ditions sponsored by the Music Teachers National 
Association. A former student of Loren Withers, 
she has now completed her second year as a scholar- 
ship student of Irwin Freundlich at the Juilliard 
School of Music in New York. Her program follows: 
Sonata No. 42 in C Haydn 

Allegro 
Adagio 
Allegro molto 
Impromptu in C minor, Op. 90 No. 1 Schubert 
Sonata in E-flat, Op. 81a Beethoven 

Adagio; Allegro 
Andante espressivo 
Vivacissimamente 



Sonata No. 8 in B-flat. Op. 84 
Andante dolce; Allegro 
Andante sognando 
Vivace 



Prokoficff 



CHEMISTRY SEMINAR 
The Chemistry Seminar will meet on Friday, July 
12th, at 3 :30 p.m. in Room 126 Psychology-Sociology 
Building. Professor V. M. Clark, School of Molecular 
Sciences, University of Warwick, England will pre- 
sent a seminar on "The Photochemical Formation 
of Heteroaromatic Systems." Refreshments will be 
served in the lobby of the Chemistry Building at 3 :00 
p.m. All interested persons are cordially invited to 
attend. 



POETRY READING 
Jerry Eidenier will read his poetry in The Ce- 
lestial Omnibus coffee house at 8 :30 and 10 :00 p.m. 
on Friday, July 12th. Mr. Eidenier is assistant man- 
ager of the Gothic Bookshop and is a Duke alumnus. 
He has written poetry for several years and his recent 
readings have been well received. A cordial invitation 
is extended to those interested. 



TERM I FINAL EXAMINATION SCHEDULE 
Classes scheduled at: Examinations are: 
7:40-9:00 daily Wednesday, July 17, 7:40-10:40 a.m. 

1:40-3:00 daily Wednesday, July 17, 1:40-4:40 p.m. 

9:20-10:40 daily Wednesday, July 17, 7:00-10:00 p.m. 

11:00-12:20 daily Thursday, July 18, 7:40-10:40 a.m. 

The examinations in four-semester hour science 
courses will be held in accordance with a schedule 
arranged by the department concerned. 

Examinations for all short-term courses will be 



(3) 



on the last scheduled class day. The instructor will 
make the time arrangements. 

All other examinations must be held and taken 
according to the above schedule. 

Any student who desires a report of grades from 
the instructor should leave a self-addressed postal 
card or stamped envelope with the instructor. Grades 
will not be given out orally at the Summer Session 
Office. 

TERM II REGISTRATION 

Students who have pre-enrolled for Term II are 
urged to complete the entire process of registration 
between the hours of 9:30 a.m. and 12:00 noon and 
2:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. in the Summer Session Office, 
Room 119, Allen Building, between July 8th and 
July 15th. 

Those students who have not pre-enrolled for 
Term II are urged to do so with their respective 
schools or colleges and then complete the registration 
as announced above. 

The Graduate School will accept registrants dur- 
ing the same hours and on the same dates as indicated 
above for the Summer Session Office. 

Students who complete their registration will not 
be required to appear on Registration Day, Friday, 
July 19th. 



1968 SUMMER SESSION 

SOFTBALL LEAGUE 

(FIRST TERM) 



Date: 

Monday, July 8th 

Tuesday, July 9th 



Wednesday, July 10th 



Thursday, July 11th 



Friday, July 12th 



Game : 

Bye vs. Forestry 

Economics vs. Physics 

Immunology vs. Sociology 
Biology vs. Biochemistry 
Chemistry Blue vs. AROD 
Rebels vs. Chemistry White 

Bye vs. Sociology 
Physics vs. Biochemistry 
Forestry vs. AROD 
Economics vs. Chemistry 

White 
Immunology vs. Rebels 
Biology vs. Chemistry Blue 

Bye vs. Biochemistry 
Sociology vs. AROD 
Physics vs. Chemistry White 
Forestry vs. Rebels 
Economics vs. Chemistry 

Blue 
Immunology vs. Biology 

Bye vs. AROD 
Biochemistry vs. Chemistry 

White 
Sociology vs. Rebels 
Physics vs. Chemistry Blue 
Forestry vs. Biology 
Economics vs. Immunology 



Monday, July 15th 



Tuesday, July 16th 



Bye vs. Chemistry White 
AROD vs. Rebels 
Biochemistry vs. Chemistry 

Blue 
Sociology vs. Biology 
Physics vs. Immunology 
Forestry vs. Economics 
All Stars vs. Champions 



VIOLENCE IN AMERICA SEMINAR 
Mrs. Bessie McLaurin who directs the tutoring 
program for Operation Breakthrough, Durham's pov- 
erty program will lead the Seminar session on Thurs- 
day, July 11th. The topic will be "Death at an Early 
Age: Violence in the Educational System." These 
weekly sessions are open to anyone interested in the 
topics, and are held in the Celestial Omnibus coffee 
house, beneath Flowers Lounge. 



Carlson, will 
July 11th, at 



PIANO RECITAL 
JANE CARLSON 

Juilliard Faculty member, Jane 
appear in a piano recital on Thursday, 
8:15 p.m. in Page Auditorium. Miss Carlson was a 
Naumburg Award winner, and she has appeared at 
Carnegie Hall, London's Wigmore Hall, in broadcast 
recitals for the BBC, and with numerous orchestras 
here and abroad. Paul Hindemith chose her to per- 
form his works in concerts which he conducted, and 
her recording of his monumental "Ludus Tonalis" 
has just been released. A music critic in Amsterdam, 
Holland wrote, "Jane Carlson has more music in her 
left little finger than many have in all fingers toge- 
ther. ' ' Her recital is being jointly sponsored by Loren 
Withers' Piano Workshop and the Duke Summer En- 
tertainment Series. The public is cordially invited 
to the program which follows : 



Sonata in D minor, L. 413 
Sonata in B minor, L. 33 
Sonata in G Major, L. 286 
Sonata in C Major, Op. 2, No. 3 

Allegro con brio 

Adagio 

Scherzo :Allegro 

Allegro assai 
Four Piano Pieces. Op. 119 

Intermezzo in B minor 

Intermezzo in E minor 

Intermezzo in C Major 

Rhapsody in E-flat Major 
Sonata No. 3 

Theme and Variations 

Presto e leggiero 

Adagio 

Allegro vivo e ritmico 
Pour le Piano 

Prelude 

Sarabande 

Toccata 



Scarlatti 



Beethoi>en 



Brahms 



Dello Joio 



Debussy 



IMPORTANT— Notices for the Duke University Calendar should be submitted 

IN WRITTEN FORM to Room 207 Flowers Building, West Campus not later 

than 5:00 p.m., Tuesday. Extension 2911. 



\ I 



Dufa University 

~ALENDAR 







.July 14-21, 1968 



Sunday, July 14 

8:30 a.m. Chapel Choir Rehearsal. The Chapel. 

9 :30 a.m. University Service of Worship. Univer- 
sity Chapel. Preacher: The Reverend Dr. 
James T. Cleland, Dean of the Chapel and 
James B. Duke Professor of Preaching. Ser- 
mon: "More Reflections on Nat Turner." 
Broadcast over WDNC and WDNC-PM at 
11 :00 a.m. 

10:20 a.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Chal- 
lenges in Education." WCHL Chapel Hill. 
Dr. Robert Krueger will discuss "Education: 
Tailor-made. ' ' 

10:30-10:45 a.m. Carillon Recital. Mr. J. Samuel 
Ha mm ond, University Carillonneur. 

11 :00 a.m. University Service of Worship broadcast 
over Radio Station WDNC and WDNC-PM. 

12:00 noon-10:00 p.m. Student Union Recreational 
Facilities open. Game Room, 03 Flowers 
Building. 

4:00-6:00 p.m. International Open House. 2022 
Campus Drive. 

8:30 p.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Chal- 
lenges in Education." WPTF Raleigh. Pro- 
fessor Iain Hamilton will discuss "New Trends 
in Opera." 



Monday, July 15 



12 :00 noon-10 :00 p.m. Student Union Recreational 
Facilities open. Game Room, 03 Flowers 
Building. 

2 :00-3 :30 p.m. West Campus Pool open for women. 

2 :00-5 :30 p.m. Summer Session Recreational Pro- 
gram. Card Gymnasium. 

4 :25-5 :45 p.m. West Campus Pool open for men. 



5:30 p.m. Summer Session Softball League Games. 

7 :00 p.m. International Folk Dancing. Internation- 
al House. 2022 Campus Drive. 

7:30-10:00 p.m. Scottish Folk Dancing. Presby- 
terian Student Center. Alexander Avenue. 

8 :15-9 :30 p.m. West Campus Pool open to faculty 
members and their families. Faculty children 
must be accompanied by their parents. 



Tuesday, July 16 

12:00 noon-10:00 p.m. Student Union Recreational 
Facilities open. Game Room, 03 Flowers 
Building. 

2 :00-3 :30 p.m. West Campus Pool open for women. 

2 :00-5 :30 p.m. Summer Session Recreational Pro- 
gram. Card Gymnasium. 

4 :25-5 :45 p.m. West Campus Pool open for men. 

5 :30 p.m. Summer Session Softball League Games. 

8:30 p.m. Pinter Play Reading Circle. Celestial 
Omnibus. 



Wednesday, July 17 

12 :00 noon-10 :00 p.m. Student Union Recreational 
Facilities open. Game Room, 03 Flowers 
Building. 

2 :00-3 :30 p.m. West Campus Pool open for women. 

2 :00-5 :30 p.m. Summer Session Recreational Pro- 
gram. Card Gymnasium. 

4 :25-5 :45 p.m. West Campus Pool open for men. 

7 :00 and 9 :00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page Au- 
ditorium. No film. 



Thursday, July 18 

12:00 noon-10:00 p.m. Student Union Recreational 
Facilities open. Game Room, 03 Flowers 
Building. 

2 :00-3 :30 p.m. West Campus Pool open for women. 

2:00-5:30 p.m. Summer Session Recreational Pro- 
gram. Card Gymnasium. 

4 :25-5 :45 p.m. West Campus Pool open for men. 

7:00 p.m. Experimental Seminar: "Violence in 
America." Celestial Omnibus. 

8:15-9:30 p.m. West Campus Pool open to faculty 
members and their families. Faculty children 
must be accompanied by their parents. 



Friday, July 19 

8:30 a.m.-l:00 p.m. General registration for Term 
II. Room 119 Allen Building 
12:00 noon-10:00 p.m. Student Union Recreational 
Facilities open. Game Room, 03 Flowers 
Building. 

2 :00-3 :30 p.m. West Campus Pool open for women. 

2:00-5:30 p.m. Summer Session Recreational Pro- 
gram. Card Gymnasium. 

4 :25-5 :45 p.m. West Campus Pool open for men. 

6:00-7:00 p.m. Chapel Choir Rehearsal. The 

Chapel. 
8:30 and 10:00 p.m. Lee Hill, Guitarist. Celestial 

Omnibus. 



Saturday, July 20 

Instruction begins in all Second Term courses 
except 4 s.h. courses in Chemistry, Geology, 
and Physics which begin on Monday, July 
22nd. 

9:55 a.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Chal- 
lenges in Education." WDNC Durham. Dr. 
Robert Krueger will discuss "Education: 
Tailor-made. ' ' 

12:00 noon-10:00 p.m. Student Union Recreational 
Facilities open. Game Room, 03 Flowers 
Building. 

2 :00-3 :30 p.m. West Campus Pool open for women. 

4 :25-5 :45 p.m. West Campus Pool open for men. 

(2 



Sunday, July 21 

8 :30 a.m. Chapel Choir Rehearsal. The Chapel. 

9 :30 a.m. University Service of Worship. Univer- 
sity Chapel. Preacher : The Reverend Dr. J. S. 
Whale, Newton Abbot, Devon, England. 
Broadcast over WDNC and WDNC-FM at 
11 :00 a.m. 

10:20 a.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Chal- 
lenges in Education." WCHL Chapel Hill. 
Dr. Thomas Vernon will discuss ' ' Is Corporate 
Punishment Legal?" 

10:30-10:45 a.m. Carillon Recital. Mr. J. Samuel 
Hammond, University Carillonneur. 

11 :00 a.m. University Service of Worship broadcast 
over Radio Station WDNC and WDNC-FM. 

12:00 noon-10:00 p.m. Student Union Recreational 
Facilities open. Game Room, 03 Flowers 
Building. 

4:00-6:00 p.m. International Open House. 2022 
Campus Drive. 

8:30 p.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Chal- 
lenges in Education." WPTF Raleigh. Pro- 
fessor John Macduff will discuss "Man Under 
Stress." 



UNIVERSITY SERVICE OF WORSHIP 

The Reverend Dr. James T. Cleland, Dean of the 
Chapel and James B. Duke Professor of Preaching, 
will deliver the sermon at the University Service of 
Worship on Sunday, July 14th. Following a pattern 
set during the last five summers, the University Ser- 
vice of Worship during the Summer Session will 
commence at 9 :30 a.m. instead of 11 :00 a.m. The ser- 
vice will end at 10 :30 a.m., at which time the congre- 
gation is invited to go directly to the air-conditioned 
Union Ballroom, where coffee will be served, and 
where an hour of informal discussion will take place. 



VIOLENCE IN AMERICA SEMINAR 

Dr. Harmon Smith, Associate Professor of Chris- 
tian Ethics, will lead the Seminar on Thursday, July 
18th, on the subject, The Politics of Dissent. The 
meeting place is the Celestial Omnibus coffee house, 
the time is 7:00 p.m. The whole community is in- 
vited. The following week, the topic will be Violence 
and the Media. This will be led by Dr. Henry Clark 
and others. 

) 



1968 SUMMER SESSION SOFTBALL 

LEAGUE 

(FIRST TERM) 



Date: 

Monday, July 15th 



Tuesday, July 16th 



Game: 

Bye vs. Chemistry White 
AROD vs. Rebels 
Biochemistry vs. Chemistry 

Blue 
Sociology vs. Biology 
Physics vs. Immunology 
Forestry vs. Economics 

All Stars vs. Champions 



CELESTIAL OMNIBUS COFFEE HOUSE 

On Friday, July 26th, Lee Hill, guitarist and folk 
singer will perform in the Celestial Omnibus coffee 
house, at 8 :30 and 10 :00 p.m. A student from the 
"West Coast now working in Durham, Lee has a talent 
for improvising on the guitar as well as accompanying 
himself singing folk songs. Come and enjoy some 
good entertainment. 



TERM II REGISTRATION 

General registration for Term II will be held in 
the Summer Session Office, Room 119, Allen Building, 
on Friday, July 19, between the hours of 8:30 a.m. 
and 1 :00 p.m. 

COURSE CHANGES 

Course changes for the Term II Summer Session 
courses will be made in the Summer Session Office, 
Room 119, Allen Building, on July 20, 22, and 23. 
(The office will be closed after 12:30 p.m. on July 
20.) 

ROOM ASSIGNMENT FOR COURSES IN 
TERM II 

For room assignments in Term II courses, see the 
schedule posted on the Bulletin Board outside Room 
119, Allen Building. 

HOURS OF THE OFFICE OF THE 

SUMMER SESSION 

The Office of the Summer Session will be open 
from 8 :30 a.m. to 5 :00 p.m. Monday through Friday, 



and from 9 :00 a.m. to 12 :30 p.m. on Saturdays 
throughout the summer. 



DUKE UNIVERSITY LIBRARY SUMMER 

SESSION SCHEDULE 

June 12 through August 23, 1968 

Perkins Library 



Monday-Friday 

Saturday 

Sunday 

Woman 's College Library 
Monday-Friday 
Saturday 
Sunday 



00 a.m.— 10:00 p.m. 
00 a.m.— 6:00 p.m. 
00 p.m. — 6:00 p.m. 



8:30 a.m. — 5:00 p.m. 
8:30 a.m. — 1:00 p.m. 
Closed 



Schedules for other campus libraries will be posted. 



MEDICAL CENTER LIBRARY 
SUMMER HOURS 



8:30 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. 
8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. 
12:00 noon to 5:00 p.m. 

June 1 — September 2, 1968 



Weekdays 

Saturdays 

Sundays 



MEN'S DINING HALLS 



Meal 


Hours— Summer School — 1968 


The Oak Room will be closed 


on Saturdays and 


Sundays. 








Blue and White Boom 


Oak Room 




(Monday -Friday) 




Breakfast 


7:00- 9:30 


Open for Luncheon 


Snaek Bar 


9:00-11:00 


only Monday thru 


Lunch 


11:30- 2:00 


Friday 


Dinner 


5:00- 6:30 


11:30-2:00 




University 


Boom 




Saturday 


Sunday 


Breakfast 


7:00- 9:30 


8:30-11:00 


Snack Bar 


9:00-11:00 




Lunch 


11:30- 1:30 


11:30- 1:30 


Dinner 


5:00- 6:30 


5:00- 6:30 



Although the University Room Cafeteria line will 
be closed Monday thru Friday, there will be access 
to the Air-Conditioned Dining Room. 



IMPORTANT— Notices for the Duke University Calendar should be submitted 

IN WRITTEN FORM to Room 207 Flowers Building, West Campus not later 

than 5:00 p.m., Tuesday. Extension 2911. 



Duke University 

CALENDAR 




.July 21-28, 1968 



Sunday, July 21 



9:45 a.m. Chapel Choir Rehearsal. University 
Chapel. 

10:20 a.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Chal- 
lenges in Education." WCHL Chapel Hill. 
Dr. Thomas Vernon will discuss "Is Corporate 
Punishment Legal?" 

10:30-10:45 a.m. Carillon Recital. Mr. J. Samuel 
Hammond, University Carillonneur. 

11 :00 a.m. University Service of Worship. Univer- 
sity Chapel. Preacher: The Reverend Dr. J. S. 
Whale, Newton Abbot, Devon, England. Broad- 
cast over Radio Station WDNC and WDNC- 
FM. 
4:00-6:00 p.m. International Open House. 2022 

Campus Drive. 
8:30 p.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Chal- 
lenges in Education." WPTF Raleigh. Pro- 
fessor John Macduff will discuss "Man Under 
Stress." 



Monday, July 22 

Final date for filing intention to complete 
Master's Degree. Graduate School Office. 

9 :00 a.m.-5 :00 p.m. Peace Corps Interviewers. 
Room 101 Union Building. 

2 :00-3 :30 p.m. West Campus Pool open for women. 

2:00-5:30 p.m. Summer Session Recreational Pro- 
gram. Card Gymnasium. 

4 :25-5 :45 p.m. West Campus Pool open for men. 

7 :00 p.m. International Folk Dancing. Internation- 
al House. 2022 Campus Drive. 

7:30-10:00 p.m. Scottish Folk Dancing. Presby- 
terian Student Center. Alexander Avenue. 

8:15-9:30 p.m. West Campus Pool open to faculty 
members and their families. Faculty children 
must be accompanied by their parents. 



Tuesday, July 23 

9 :00 a.m.-5 :00 p.m. Peace Corps Interviewers. 
Room 101 Union Building. 



2 :00-3 :30 p.m. West Campus Pool open for women. 

2 :00-5 :50 p.m. Summer Session Recreational Pro- 
gram. Card Gymnasium. 

4:00 p.m. Summer Session Softball League Meeting. 
105 Card Gymnasium. 

4 :25-5 :45 p.m. West Campus Pool open for men. 

8 :30 p.m. Pinter Play Reading Circle. Celestial 
Omnibus. 



Wednesday, July 24 

9 :00 a.m.-5 :00 p.m. Peace Corps Interviewers. 
Room 101 Union Building. 

2 :00-3 :30 p.m. West Campus Pool open for women. 

2:00-5:30 p.m. Summer Session Recreational Pro- 
gram. Card Gymnasium. 

4:25-5:45 p.m. West Campus Pool open for men. 

7 :00 and 9 :00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page Au- 
ditorium. "The Deadly Affair" with James 
Mason, Maximilian Schell, Harriet Anderson 
and Simone Signoret. John Le Carre's excit- 
ing book now on film in technicolor. 

8 :00 p.m. Duke Summer Entertainment : Jazz-In 
with Donald Byrd and Jazz Ensemble. Karl 
E. Zener Auditorium, Room 130 Sociology- 
Psychology Building. 



Thursday, July 25 

9 :00 a.m. -5 :00 p.m. Peace Corps Interviewers. 
Room 101 Union Building. 
11:00 a.m.-8:00 p.m. Sales Exhibition: London Graf- 

ica Arts, Inc. West Union Lounge. 
12 :30 p.m. Kappa Delta Pi Luncheon Meeting. Union 
Ballroom. 

2 :00-3 :30 p.m. West Campus Pool open for women. 

2:00-5:30 p.m. Summer Session Recreational Pro- 
gram. Card Gymnasium. 

4:00 p.m. Southeastern Institute of Medieval and 
Renaissance Studies Open Lecture: Dr. Don 
Allen. 130, Karl E. Zener Auditorium, Soci- 
ology-Psychology Building. 



4 :25-5 :45 p.m. "West Campus Pool open for men. 

7:00 p.m. Experimental Seminar: "Violence in 
America." Celestial Omnibus. 

8:15-9:30 p.m. "West Campus Pool open to faculty 
members and their families. Faculty children 
must be accompanied by their parents. 



Friday, July 26 



9:00 

11:00 

2:00 
2:00 

4:25 
6:00 

8:00 



8:30 
8:30 



a.m.-5 :00 p.m. Peace Corps Interviewers. 
Room 101 Union Building. 
a.m.-4:00 p.m. Sales Exhibition: London Graf- 
ica Arts, Inc. "West Union Lounge. 
3 :30 p.m. West Campus Pool open for women. 
5 :30 p.m. Summer Session Recreational Pro- 
gram. Card Gymnasium. 
5:45 p.m. "West Campus Pool open for men. 
7:00 p.m. Chapel Choir Rehearsal. University 
Chapel. 

p.m. Summer Film Series: "Never Give a 
Sucker an Even Break." Biological Sciences 
Auditorium. (American) 63 Minutes. Starring 
"W. C. Fields, Gloria Jean, Leon Errol. "When 
a famous movie comedian becomes a young 
girl's guardian, he gets involved in a wild mix- 
up of hectic plane trips and other excitements. 
COPS— Keaton Short. 22 Minutes, 
and 10:00 p.m. Lee Hill, Guitarist. Celestial 
Omnibus. 

p.m. Open House and Dance. Card Gym- 
nasium. 



Saturday, July 27 

9:55 a.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Chal- 
lenges in Education." "WDNC Durham. Dr. 
Thomas Vernon will discuss "Is Corporate 
Punishment Legal?" 

2 :00-3 :30 p.m. "West Campus Pool open for women. 

4:25-5:45 p.m. "West Campus Pool open for men. 



Sunday, July 28 



9:45 



10:20 



a.m. Chapel Choir Rehearsal. University 
Chapel. 

a.m. Duke University Radio Program, ' ' Chal- 
lenges in Education." "WCHL Chapel Hill. 
Dr. J. H. Phillips will discuss "Churches and 
Sex Education." 
10:30-10:45 a.m. Carillon Recital. Mr. J. Samuel 
Hammond, University Carillonneur. 
a.m. University Service of "Worship. Univer- 
sity Chapel. Preacher : The Reverend Dr. John 
"W. Carlton. Sermon: "On Doing Justice and 
Seeking Truth." Broadcast over Radio Station 
"WDNC and WDNC-FM. 



11:00 



4:00-6:00 p.m. International Open House. 2022 
Campus Drive. 

8:30 p.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Chal- 
lenges in Education." WPTF Raleigh. Dr. 
Henry Hellmers will discuss ' ' Investigations at 
a Phytotron." 



UNIVERSITY SERVICE OF "WORSHIP 
The Reverend Dr. J. S. "Whale, Newton Abbot, 
Devon, England, will deliver the sermon at the Uni- 
versity Service of Worship on Sunday, July 21st. 
Departing from the early morning summer schedule, 
the service will be held at the usual hour of 11 :00 
a.m. The coffee hour will be discontinued and this 
eleven o'clock schedule for the Sunday Service of 
Worship will continue for the rest of the summer. 



ART EXHIBITION 
CONTEMPORARY JAPANESE PRINTS 

A new exhibition, Contemporary Japanese Prints, 
may be seen in the West Union Building Gallery 
area beginning Sunday, July 21st. The exhibition is 
on loan from the Ferdinand Roten Galleries, Balti- 
more, Maryland and will remain on exhibit through 
the second semester of summer school. Those wish- 
ing to purchase works from the exhibit may make 
arrangements in the Student Activities Office, Room 
207 Flowers Building from 8 :00 a.m.-5 :00 p.m. Mon- 
day through Friday. 

Since World War II there has been a remarkable 
Renaissance in Japanese printmaking. Traditional 
craftsmanship and a new inventiveness, partly in- 
spired by Western-world art developments, have 
recently been most effectively combined. 

Most of the prints shown are color woodcuts, but 
a variety of technical means is demonstrated in this 
selection of works by notable Japanese artists of the 
contemporary scene. Some of the works are well- 
rooted in the classical style, many more are "inter- 
national" in character, but all display the great skill 
and personal quality of their makers. Included in 
this exhibition are works by Saito, Watanabe, Mori, 
Matsumoto, Ikeda, Yoshida, Sasajima, Hashimoto and 
others. 



PEACE CORPS INTERVIEWS 
Peace Corps Representatives will be on campus 
Monday. July 22nd-Friday, July 26th to talk with 
persons interested in Peace Corps service. Represen- 
tatives will accept applications and administer the 
Modern Language Aptitude test. 

This summer recruiting is especially for programs 
in Africa which will begin training in the fall. Appli- 
cants will be considered for programs in such coun- 
tries as Nigeria, Ivory Coast, Kenya and Swaziland. 
Qualified persons applying now for these African 
programs can be invited to training as early as Sep- 
tember 1, 1968. Applications for other regions will 
also be accepted. 

The representatives will be located in Room 101 
Union Building from 9 :00 a.m.-5 :00 p.m. daily. 



(2) 



Peace Corps maintains a permanent office at 
UNC-Chapel Hill in the "Wesley Foundation — tele- 
phone 967-1421. 



SOFTBALL LEAGUE MEETING 
There will be a Summer Session Softball League 
meeting on Tuesday, July 23rd at 4 :00 p.m. in Room 
105 Card Gymnasium. Managers or Captains are re- 
quested to be present and, if possible, to have teams 
organized. 



PINTER PLAY READING CIRCLE 

On Tuesday, July 23rd, the Pinter Circle will 
meet at 8 :30 p.m. in the coffee house to read THE 
HOMECOMING, one of Pinter's most successful 
plays — in Broadway terms ! A most provocative play 
about a professor who returns home to London from 
America with his wife, finding there father, uncle 
and two brothers. All who are interested are invited 
to share in the reading. 



DUKE SUMMER ENTERTAINMENT 
JAZZ-IN 

Through the courtesy of the North Carolina Col- 
lege Fine Arts Festival an informal jazz concert with 
Donald Byrd and jazz ensemble will be presented on 
Wednesday, July 24th at 8:00 p.m. in the Karl E. 
Zener Auditorium, Room 130 Sociology-Psychology 
Building. There will be no charge and the public 
is cordially invited to the concert and to visit the 
exhibit of artifacts from Liberia on display in the 
corridors. The Arts Festival, now in its second week 
at North Carolina College, is funded under Title III 
Higher Education Act through the Department of 
Health, Education and Welfare. 

The second of two outdoor concerts is scheduled 
for the North Carolina campus at 7 :00 p.m. on Thurs- 
day, July 25th. The concert will be held outside the 
Fine Arts Building. 

Also of interest will be the panel discussion on 
Thursday, July 25th at 3 :30 p.m. in the Recreation 
Room of the Annie Day Shepherd Dormitory. The 
discussion will concern itself with the quest for 
black identity in the Fine Arts. A major participant 
in this discussion will be the distinguished Nigerian 
visitor, Dr. Fela Sowande, composer and ethnomusi- 
cologist. Dr. Sowande is in this country to discuss 
Afro-American music. 

All sessions of the festival are open to the public 
without charge. 



SALES EXHIBITION 
ORIGINAL GRAPHIC ART 
A quality exhibition of original graphic art com- 
prising etchings, lithographs, woodcuts and silk- 
screens of important and outstanding artists will be 
on view and for sale in the West Union Lounge on 
Thursday, July 25th from 11 :00 a.m.-8 :00 p.m. and 
on Friday, July 26th from 11 :00 a.m.-4 :00 p.m. 

London Grafica Arts with galleries in Detroit, 



Michigan, New York and London, aims to show the 
best graphics available at any time as well as pro- 
vide a succinct history of the development of the 
graphic arts. For over a year now, London Graphica 
Arts has been visiting universities and colleges 
throughout America and England, mounting exhi- 
bitions of original prints of a range and quality 
usually seen only in major galleries. The enthusiastic 
response has fully justified its aim of bringing fine 
graphic work to a nationwide audience. Students 
and faculty, especially, appreciate the opportunity 
to view a comprehensive selection of original works. 

The exhibition includes every form of printmaking 
from hand-printed manuscript pages and music sheets, 
18th and 19th century prints from Europe, and a 
comprehensive selection of 20th century artists. Se- 
lections include such artists as Renoir, Degas, Manet, 
Toulouse-Lautrec, Picasso, Chagall, Varsarely and 
Giacometti, not to mention the more esoteric but 
equally important masters of printmaking. Rouault's 
"Miserere," Picasso's "Vollard Suite" and Chagall's 
"Daphnis and Chloe" are all represented. 

Finally, there is an exciting selection of colorful 
work by young contemporaries to attract those ad- 
venturous enough to patronize artists whose prices 
have not yet become inflated by fame and demand. 
The prices range from $10 to several thousand for 
the rarer examples. 

The public is cordially invited to attend the sales 
exhibition. 



KAPPA DELTA PI LUNCHEON MEETING 
The Alpha Tan Chapter of Kappa Delta Pi, honor 
society in education, will hold a luncheon meeting in 
the West Union Ballroom on Thursday, July 25th, at 
12:30 p.m. 

Speaker for the occasion will be Dr. Sherwood 
Githens of the Education Department. He will speak 
on "Science Education as a Profession in our Scien- 
tific Age." 



FOURTH ANNUAL SESSIONS 

SOUTHEASTERN INSTITUTE 

MEDIEVAL AND RENAISSANCE STUDIES 

The Fourth Annual Session of the Southeastern 
Institute of Medieval and Renaissance Studies, part 
of the Duke-UNC Cooperative Program in the Hu- 
manities, will be held this year on the Duke campus, 
July 20th-August 24th. The Institute brings together 
scholars in the Medieval and Renaissance areas from 
colleges and universities throughout the southeastern 
states, representing such disciplines as Art, History, 
Literature, Philosophy, and Religion. Its purpose is 
to promote advanced research and improved teach- 
ing. 

The public is invited to attend the lectures of the 
Senior Fellows, all of which will be at 4:00 p.m., 
Room 130, Karl E. Zener Auditorium, Sociology- 
Psychology Building. The lecture schedule follows: 

Thursday, July 25th — Dr. Don Allen (Johns 
Hopkins University). "The Antiquarians and Ren- 
aissance Allegorical Interpretation." 



(3) 



Tuesday, July 30th— Dr. Kenneth Clark (Duke 
University). "Ancient Books and the Biblical 
Texts." 

Thursday, August 1st — Dr. Otis Green (Univer- 
sity of Pennsylvania). "Imaginative Authority in 
Spanish Literature." 

Tuesday, August 6th — Dr. 0. B. Hardison (Uni- 
versity of North Carolina). "Averoes' Paraphrase 
and Medieval Poetics." 

Thursday, August 8th — Dr. John G. Kunstmanu 
(University of North Carolina). "On Tubs and 
Whales — From the Psalmist and Alexander the Great 
to Heinrich Von Kleist. " 

Tuesday, August 13th — Dr. John Tate Lanning 
(Duke University). "The University in Spain and 
in the Indies." 

Thursday, August 15th — Dr. Jean-Claude Margo- 
lin (Visiting Lecturer). "Erasmus and Music." 

Tuesday, August 20th — Dr. Lewis W. Spitz ( Stan- 
ford University). "Luther's Anthropological Real- 
ism. ' ' 



VIOLENCE IN AMERICA SEMINAR 
On Thursday, July 25th, Mr. Harry Boyte will 
lead a session on "A Class Analysis of Southern 
Violence." Mr. Boyte is a former Duke student and 
has returned to Durham to work with ACT, a newly 
organized operation working toward community or- 
ganization and reduction of poverty in white com- 
munities in the city. The entire Duke and Durham 
communities are invited to the Celestial Omnibus 
coffee house at 7 :00 p.m. for this discussion. 



OPEN HOUSE AND DANCE 
The first dance and open house of the second 
summer session will be held on Friday, July 26th at 
8 :30 p.m. in Card Gymnasium. Watch for special 
announcement. 



CELESTIAL OMNIBUS COFFEE HOUSE 
On Friday, July 26th, Lee Hill, guitarist and folk 
singer will perform in the Celestial Omnibus coffee 
house, at 8 :30 and 10 :00 p.m. A student from the 
West Coast now working in Durham, Lee has a talent 
for improvising on the guitar as well as accompanying 
himself singing folk songs. Come and enjoy some 
good entertainment. 



ADVANCE NOTICE 
Summer Session classes will NOT meet on Satur- 
day, August 3rd. 

HOURS OF THE OFFICE OF THE 
SUMMER SESSION 

The Office of the Summer Session will be open 
from 8 :30 a.m. to 5 :00 p.m. Monday through Friday, 
and from 9:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. on Saturdays 
throughout the summer. 

SUMMER SESSION IDENTIFICATION 
AND ADMISSION CARDS 
Student identification cards may be secured at the 
Summer Session Office. These cards will serve as 
health and recreation cards for the Summer Session. 
Summer Session identification and admission 
cards will be issued to members of the faculty and 
staff at the Summer Session Office. 

TERM II FINAL EXAMINATION 

SCHEDULE 
Classes scheduled at: Examinations are: 

7:40- 9:00 daily Friday, August 23rd, 7:40-10:40 a.m. 

1:40- 3:00 daily Friday, August 23rd, 1:40-4:40 p.m. 

9:20-10:40 daily Friday, August 23rd, 7:00-10:00 p.m. 
11:00-12:20 daily Saturday, August 24th, 7:40-10:40 a.m. 

The examinations in science courses will be held 
in accordance with a schedule arranged by the de- 
partment concerned on Friday, August 16th. 

Examinations for all short-term courses will be 
on the last scheduled class day. The instructor will 
make the time arrangements. 

All other examinations must be held and taken 
according to the above schedule. 

Any student who desires a report of grades from 
the instructor should leave a self-addressed postal 
card or stamped envelope with the instructor. Grades 
will not be given out orally at the Summer Session 
Office. 

FRENCH, GERMAN, RUSSIAN, AND 
SPANISH EXAMINATIONS 
August 3, Saturday, French, German, Russian, 
and Spanish examinations for candidates for gradu- 
ate degrees will be held at 9 :00 a.m. All candidates 
for German, French, or Russian who will be select- 
ing the Humanities or Social Science option will 
meet in Room 125, Engineering. All Spanish candi- 
dates and candidates for German, French, or Rus- 
sian who will be selecting the Biological Science or 
Physical Science option will meet in Room 111, Bio- 
logical Sciences. 



IMPORTANT— Notices for the Duke University Calendar should be submitted 

IN WRITTEN FORM to Room 207 Flowers Building, West Campus not later 

than 5:00 p.m., Tuesday. Extension 2911. 



Duke University 

calendar/ 







July 28-Aug. 4, 1968 



Sunday, July 28 



9:45 a.m. Chapel Choir Rehearsal. University 
Chapel. 
10:20 a.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Chal- 
lenges in Education." WCHL Chapel Hill. 
Dr. J. H. Phillips will discuss "Churches and 
Sex Education." 
10:30-10:45 a.m. Carillon Recital. Mr. J. Samuel 

Hammond, University Carillonneur. 
11 :00 a.m. University Service of Worship. University 
Chapel. Preacher: The Reverend Dr. John 
W. Carlton, Associate Professor of Preaching, 
Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, Louis- 
ville, Kentucky. Sermon : " On Doing Justice 
and Seeking Truth." Broadcast over Radio 
Station WDNC and WDNC-PM. 

2:30 p.m. Allied Arts Theater Guild: "The Adven- 
tures of Simple Simon." 810 "West Proctor 
Street. 

4:00-6:00 p.m. International Open House. 2022 
Campus Drive. 

8:30 p.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Chal- 
lenges in Education." WPTF Raleigh. Dr. 
Henry Hellmers will discuss ' ' Investigations at 
a Phytotron." 



Monday, July 29 

July 29- August 9 (Monday-Friday). Divinity 
School Clinics: Church Planning and Develop- 
ment, Pastoral Care, Preaching, Theology, and 
Campus Ministry. 

2:00 p.m. The final examination of Mr. Dana Win- 
ston Wilbanks for the Ph.D. degree in Religion. 
Room 210 Divinity Building. 

2 :00-3 :30 p.m. West Campus Pool open for women. 

2:00-5:30 p.m. Summer Session Recreational Pro- 
gram. Card Gymnasium. 



4 :25-5 :45 p.m. West Campus Pool open for men. 

7 :00 p.m. International Folk Dancing. Internation- 
al House. 2022 Campus Drive. 

7 :30 p.m. Scottish Folk Dancing. Presbyterian 
Student Center. Alexander Avenue. 

8 :15-9 :30 p.m. West Campus Pool open to faculty 
members and their families. Faculty children 
must be accompanied by their parents. 



Tuesday, July 30 

2 :00-3 :30 p.m. West Campus Pool open for women. 

2 :00-5 .-30 p.m. Summer Session Recreational Pro- 
gram. Card Gymnasium. 

4 :00 p.m. Southeastern Institute of Medieval and 
Renaissance Studies : Open Lecture : Dr. Ken- 
neth Clark. Room 130, Karl E. Zener Au- 
ditorium, Sociology-Psychology Building. 

4:25-5:45 p.m. West Campus Pool open for men. 

8 :30 p.m. Pinter Play Reading Circle. Celestial 
Omnibus. 



Wednesday, July 31 

2 :00-3 :30 p.m. West Campus Pool open for women. 

2 :00-5 :30 p.m. Summer Session Recreational Pro- 
gram. Card Gymnasium. 

4 :25-5 :45 p.m. West Campus Pool open for men. 

7 :00 and 9 :00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page Au- 
ditorium. "THE PROFESSIONALS" with 
Burt Lancaster, Lee Marvin, Robert Ryan and 
Claudia Cardinale. "xxxx Highest rating! A 
whopping color spectacle, filled with surprises, 
bristling with daring action and high tension 
suspense! Burt Lancaster is excellent!" — 
Wanda Hall, N. Y. Daily News. 



Thursday, August 1 

12:30 p.m. Kappa Delta Pi Luncheon Meeting. 
Union Ballroom. 

2 :00-3 :30 p.m. "West Campus Pool open for women. 

2:00-5:30 p.m. Summer Session Eeereational Pro- 
gram. Card Gymnasium. 

4:00 p.m. Southeastern Institute of Medieval and 
Kenaissance Studies. Open Lecture: Dr. Otis 
Green. Room 130, Karl E. Zener Auditorium, 
Sociology-Psychology Building. 

4 :25-5 :45 p.m. "West Campus Pool open for men. 

7:00 p.m. Experimental Seminar: "Violence in 
America." Celestial Omnibus. 

8:15-9:30 p.m. West Campus Pool open to faculty 
members and their families. Faculty children 
must be accompanied by their parents. 



Friday, August 2 

2 :00-3 :30 p.m. West Campus Pool open for women. 

2 :00-5 :30 p.m. Summer Session Recreational Pro- 
gram. Card Gymnasium. 

4:25-5:45 p.m. West Campus Pool open for men. 

6 :00-7 :00 p.m. Chapel Choir Rehearsal. University 
Chapel. 

7:30 p.m. Allied Arts Theater Guild: "The Adven- 
tures of Simple Simon." 810 West Proctor 
Street. 



Saturday, August 3 

No classes. 

9 :00 a.m. ETS language examinations in French, 
German, Russian, and Spanish. 

9:55 a.m. Duke University Radio Program. "Chal- 
lenges in Education." WDXC Durham. Dr. 
J. H. Phillips will discuss "Churches and Sex 
Education." 
10:30 a.m. Allied Arts Theater Guild. "The Ad- 
ventures of Simple Simon." 810 "West Proctor 
Street. 

2 :00-3 :30 p.m. West Campus Pool open for women. 

2:30 p.m. Allied Arts Theater Guild. "The Ad- 
ventures of Simple Simon." 810 West Proctor 
Street. 

4:25-5:45 p.m. West Campus Pool open for men. 



Sunday, August 4 

9:45 a.m. Chapel Choir Rehearsal. University 
Chapel. 
10:20 a.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Chal- 
lenges in Education." "WCHL Chapel Hill. 
Dr. Ralph Brauer will discuss "Experiments 
in a High Pressure Environment." 
10:30-10:45 a.m. Carillon Recital. Mr. J. Samuel 

Hammond, University Carillonneur. 
11 :00 a.m. University Service of Worship. University 
Chapel. Preacher: The Reverend McMurry 
Riehey, Professor of Theology and Christian 
Nurture. Broadcast over Radio Station WDNC 
and WDNC-FM. 

2:30 p.m. Allied Arts Theater Guild. "The Adven- 
tures of Simple Simon." 810 "West Proctor 
Street. 

4:00-6:00 p.m. International Open House. 2022 
Campus Drive. 

8:30 p.m. Duke University Radio Program. "Chal- 
lenges in Education." "WPTF Raleigh. Dr. 
Robert Krueger will discuss "Education: 
Tailor-made." 



UNIVERSITY SERVICE OF WORSHIP 
The Reverend Dr. John W. Carlton. Associate Pro- 
fessor of Preaching, Southern Baptist Theological 
Seminary. Louisville. Kentucky, will deliver the ser- 
mon at the University Service of "Worship on Sunday, 
July 28th. Departing from the early morning sum- 
mer schedule, the service will be held at the usual 
hour of 11 :00 a.m. The coffee hour will be discontin- 
ued and this eleven o'clock schedule for the Sunday 
Service of Worship will continue for the rest of the 
summer. 



ALLIED ARTS THEATER GUILD 
"THE ADVENTURES OF SIMPLE SIMON" 
The next Allied Arts Theater Guild production will 
be a play with music entitled "The Adventures of 
Simple Simon" and directed by Doe Clay. Duke '66. 
The performers, whose ages range from 8-17 years, 
include the following Duke community children: 
Robin and April Clark, daughters of Dr. Henry 
Clark (religion), Lindy Guttman, daughter of Dr. 
Norman Guttman (Psychology), and Nancy Bryan, 
daughter of Dr. Edward Bryan (Civil Engineering'). 
"The Adventures of Simple Simon" will include 
such Mother Goose favorites as Georgie Porgie, Mis- 
tress Mary, and Little Bo-Peep. 

Performances will be at Allied Arts. 810 West 
Proctor Street, on Friday. July 26th at 7 :30 p.m., Sat- 
urday, July 27th at 10 :30 a.m. and 2 :30 p.m., Sunday. 
July 28th at 2 :30 p.m., and the following week-end at 
the same times. Admission : 60£ for children and $1.00 



(2) 



for adults. Reservations can be made by calling 
682-5519. 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. Dana Winston Wil- 
banks for the Ph.D. degree in Religion will be held 
on Monday, July 29th at 2:00 p.m. in Room 210 
Divinity Building. The subject of Mr. Wilbanks' 
dissertation is "A Christian Ethical Analysis Of 
Revolution." 

The committee to conduct the examination consists 
of Professors Waldo Beach, Egil Grislis, Stuart Hen- 
ry, Creighton Lacy and John H. Hallowell. Profes- 
sor Beach will preside. 



MEDIEVAL AND RENAISSANCE 
STUDIES LECTURES 
In the continuing sessions of the Southeastern 
Institute of Medieval and Renaissance Studies, part 
of the Duke-UNC Cooperative Program in the Hu- 
manities, Dr. Kenneth Clark of the Duke Divinity 
School will speak on "Ancient Books and the Bibli- 
cal Texts" on Tuesday, July 30th. Dr. Otis Green 
of the University of Pennsylvania will speak on 
"Imaginative Authority in Spanish Literature" on 
Thursday, August 1st. The public is invited to both 
lectures which will be given at 4 :00 p.m. in Room 
130. Karl E. Zener Auditorium, Sociology-Psychology 
Building. 



1968 SUMMER SESSION SOFTBALL LEAGUE 

(SECOND TERM) 
Date: Game: 

Monday. July 29th Bye vs. Physics 

Forestry vs. Sociology 
Bye vs. Chemistry Blue 
Rebels vs. Biology 
Tuesday, Chemistry White vs. Psychology 

•July' 30th AROD vs. Economics 

Biochemistry vs. Forestry 
Sociology vs. Physics 
Wednesday, Bye vs. Sociology 

July 31st Chemistry Blue vs. Psychology 

Forestry vs. Economics 
Thursday, Rebels vs. Economics 

August 1st Chemistry White vs. Forestry 

AROD vs. Physics 
Biochemistry vs. Sociology 
Friday, Bye vs. Psychology 

August 2nd Biology vs. Economics 

Biology vs. Chemistry Blue 

SPECIAL NOTICE 

Most games will be played on Tuesday and Thurs- 
day with the starting time at 5 :30 p.m. All rain-out 
games will be played the following Monday and Fri- 
day when possible. Physics games will be played at 
4 :30 when possible. 



PINTER PLAY READING CIRCLE 
On Tuesday, July 30th, Harold Pinter's play, The 
Birthday Party, will be read. If you enjoy reading 
or listening, join the Circle in the Celestial Omnibus 
Coffee House at 8 :30 p.m. 



KAPPA DELTA PI LUNCHEON MEETING 
The Alpha Tau Chapter of Kappa Delta Pi, honor 
society in education, will hold a luncheon meeting in 
the West Union Ballroom on Thursday, August 1st, 
at 12 :30 p.m. 

Speaker for the occasion will be Dr. J. A. Davis 
of the Educational Testing Service. He will speak on 
"Current Research in Higher Education." 



VIOLENCE IN AMERICA SEMINAR 
The seventh in a series, Violence and the Media 
will be the topic of the discussion group which meets 
on Thursday, August 1st, at 7 :00 p.m. in the Celestial 
Omnibus Coffee House beneath Flowers Lounge. A 
panel made up of Henry Clark, Department of Re- 
ligion, David Paletz, Political Science Department, 
and Peter English. 1968 Symposium chairman, will 
lead this session. The entire community is invited. 



ADVANCE NOTICE 
Summer Session classes will NOT meet on Satur- 
day, August 3rd. 

TERM II FINAL EXAMINATION SCHEDULE 

Classes scheduled at: Examinations are: 

7:40-9:00 daily Friday, August 23rd, 7:40-10:40 a.m. 

1:40-3:00 daily Friday, August 23rd, 1:40-4:40 p.m. 

0:20-10:40 daily Friday, August 23rd, 7:00-10:00 p.m. 

Il:ii0-12:20 daily Saturday, August 24th, 7:40-10:40 a.m. 

The examinations in science courses will be held in 
accordance with a schedule arranged by the depart- 
ment concerned on Friday, August 16th. 

Examinations for all short-term courses will be on 
the last scheduled class day. The instructor will make 
the time arrangements. 

All other examinations must be held and taken 
according to the above schedule. 

Any student who desires a report of grades from 
the instructor should leave a self-addressed postal 
card or stamped envelope with the instructor. Grades 
will not be given out orally at the Summer Session 
Office. 

FRENCH, GERMAN, RUSSIAN, AND SPANISH 
EXAMINATIONS 

August 3. Saturday, French, German. Russian, 
and Spanish examinations for candidates for gradu- 
ate degrees will be held at 9 :00 a.m. All candidates 
for German, French, or Russian who will be selecting 
the Humanities or Social Science option will meet 
in Room 125. Engineering. All Spanish candidates 
and candidates for German. French, or Russian who 
will be selecting the Biological Science or Physical 
Science option will meet in Room 111. Biological 
Sciences. 



IMPORTANT— Notices for the Duke University Calendar should be submitted 

IN WRITTEN FORM to Room 207 Flowers Building, West Campus not later 

than 5:00 p.m., Tuesday. Extension 2911. 



Duke University 

~ALENDAR J 



o 
^j 




August 4-11, 1968 



Sunday, August 4 

9:45 a.m. Chapel Choir Rehearsal. University- 
Chapel. 

10:20 a.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Chal- 
lenges in Education." WCHL Chapel Hill. 
Dr. Ralph Brauer will discuss "Experiments 
in a High Pressure Environment." 

10:30-10:45 a.m. Carillon Recital. Mr. J. Samuel 
Hammond, University Carillonneur. 

11 :00 a.m. University Service of Worship. Univer- 
sity Chapel. Preacher: The Reverend Dr. 
Howard C. Wilkinson, Chaplain to the Univer- 
sity. Celebrant: The Reverend Elmer 0. Hall, 
Assistant Chaplain to the University. Sermon : 
"Symbolic Speech." Broadcast over Radio 
Station WDNC and WDNC-PM. 
4:00-6:00 p.m. International Open House. 2022 

Campus Drive. 
8:30 p.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Chal- 
lenges in Education." WPTF Raleigh. Dr. 
Robert Krueger will discuss "Education: 
Tailor-made." 



Monday, August 5 

2:00 p.m. The final examination of Mr. Richard 
Walter Oscar Lethander for the Ph.D. degree 
in Economics. Room 306 Social Science Build- 
ing. 

2:00 p.m. The final examination of Mr. Robert 
Hoyt Block for the Ph.D. degree in History. 
Room 117 Allen Building. 

2 :00-3 :30 p.m. West Campus Pool open for women. 

2 :00-5 :30 p.m. Summer Session Recreational Pro- 
gram. Card Gymnasium. 

4 :25-5 :45 p.m. West Campus Pool open for men. 

5:30 p.m. Summer Session Softball League Games. 

7 :00 p.m. International Polk Dancing. Internation- 
al House. 2022 Campus Drive. 

7:30 p.m. Scottish Folk Dancing. Presbyterian 
Student Center. Alexander Avenue. 

8:15-9:30 p.m. West Campus Pool open to faculty 



members and their families. Faculty children 
must be accompanied by their parents. 



Tuesday, August 6 

2 :00-3 :30 p.m. West Campus Pool open for women. 

2 :00-5 :30 p.m. Summer Session Recreational Pro- 
gram. Card Gymnasium. 

4:00 p.m. Southeastern Institute of Medieval and 
Renaissance Studies Open Lecture: Dr. O. B. 
Hardison. Room 130, Karl E. Zener Auditori- 
um, Sociology-Psychology Building. 

4:25-5:45 p.m. West Campus Pool open for men. 

5:30 p.m. Summer Session Softball League Games. 

8:30 p.m. Pinter Play Reading Circle. Celestial 
Omnibus. 



Wednesday, August 7 

2 :00-3 :30 p.m. West Campus Pool open for women. 

2:00-5:30 p.m. Summer Session Recreational Pro- 
gram. Card Gymnasium. 

4:25-5:45 p.m. West Campus Pool open for men. 

5 :30 p.m. Summer Session Softball League Games. 

7 :00 and 9 :00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page Au- 
ditorium. "A THOUSAND CLOWNS" with 
Jason Robards, Jr., Barbara Harris, and Barry 
Gordon. "Mature, entertaining, amusingly in- 
telligent ode to nonconformity . . ." — Cue. 



Thursday, August 8 

2 :00-3 :30 p.m. West Campus Pool open for women. 

2:00-5:30 p.m. Summer Session Recreational Pro- 
gram. Card Gymnasium. 

4:00 p.m. Southeastern Institute of Medieval and 
Renaissance Studies Open Lecture: Dr. John 
Kunstmann. Room 130, Karl E. Zener Au- 
ditorium, Sociology-Psychology Building. 

4 :25-5 :45 p.m. West Campus Pool open for men. 



5:30 p.m. Summer Session Softball League Games. 

7:00 p.m. Experimental Seminar. "Violence in 
America." Celestial Omnibus. 

8:15-9:30 p.m. "West Campus Pool open to faculty 
members and tbeir families. Faculty children 
must be accompanied by their parents. 



Friday, August 9 



2 :00-3 :30 p.m. West Campus Pool open for women. 

2 -.00-5 :30 p.m. Summer Session Recreational Pro- 

gram. Card Gymnasium. 

3 :00-4 :00 p.m. Open Lecture : Dr. Richard J. Whe- 

lan will speak on "The University of Kansas 
Children's Rehabilitation Center — A Struc- 
tured Behaviorist Approach." Room 139, 
Social Science Building. 

3:00 p.m. Film: "INSIDE NORTH VIETNAM" 
Room 130, Karl E. Zener Auditorium, Soci- 
ology-Psychology Building. 

4 :25-5 :45 p.m. West Campus Pool open for men. 

5 :30 p.m. Summer Session Softball League Games. 

6:00-7:00 p.m. Chapel Choir Rehearsal. University 
Chapel. 

8:00 p.m. Summer Film Series: "Les Carbiniers." 
Biological Sciences Auditorium. 



Saturday, August 10 

9:55 a.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Chal- 
lenges in Education." WDNC Durham. Dr. 
Ralph Brauer will discuss "Experiments in a 
High Pressure Environment." 

2 :00-3 :30 p.m. West Campus Pool open for women. 

4 :25-5 :45 p.m. West Campus Pool open for men. 

5 :30 p.m. Summer Session Softball League Games. 



Sunday, August 11 

9:45 a.m. Chapel Choir Rehearsal. University 
Chapel. 

10:20 a.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Chal- 
lenges in Education." WCHL Chapel Hill. 
Mr. John Newton will discuss "The Shape of 
the Ocean Floor." 

10:30-10:45 a.m. Carillon Recital. Mr. J. Samuel 
Hammond, University Carillonneur. 

11 :00 a.m. University Service of Worship. Univer- 
sity Chapel. Preacher: The Reverend Robert 
A. Davis, United Methodist Board of Educa- 
tion, Nashville, Tennessee. Broadcast over 
Radio Station WDNC and WDNC-FM. 
4:00-6:00 p.m. International Open House. 2022 

Campus Drive. 
8:30 p.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Chal- 



lenges in Education." WPTF Raleigh. Dr. 
Thomas Vernon will discuss "Is Corporate 
Punishment Legal?" 



UNIVERSITY SERVICE OF WORSHIP 
Holy Communion will be celebrated at the Uni- 
versity Service of Worship at 11 :00 a.m. on Sunday, 
August 4th. 

The Celebrant will be the Reverend Elmer O. Hall, 
Assistant Chaplain to the University. The Reverend 
Dr. Howard C. Wilkinson, Chaplain to the University, 
will preach the sermon. 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. Robert Hoyt Block 
for the Ph.D. degree in History will be held on Mon- 
day. August 5th at 2:00 p.m. in Room 117 Allen 
Building. The subject of Mr. Block's dissertation is 
"Southern Opinion Of Woodrow Wilson's Foreign 
Policies, 1913-1917." 

The committee to conduct the examination consists 
of Professors Calvin D. Davis, Richard L. Watson, 
Arthur B. Ferguson and Richard H. Leach. Profes- 
sor Davis will preside. 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. Richard Walter Os- 
car Lethander for the Ph.D. degree in Economics will 
be held on Monday. August 5th at 2:00 p.m. in Room 
306 Social Science Building. The subject of Mr. 
Lethander 's dissertation is "The Economy Of Nica- 
ragua. ' ' 

The committee to conduct the examination con- 
sists of Professors Robert S. Smith, Joseph J. Spen- 
gler, William P. Yohe and John Tate Lanning. Pro- 
fessor Smith will preside. 



MEDIEVAL AND RENAISSANCE STUDIES 
In the continuing sessions of the Southeastern In- 
stitute of Medieval and Renaissance Studies, part of 
the Duke-UNC Cooperative Program in the Humani- 
ties, Dr. O. B. Hardison of the University of North 
Carolina will speak on "AveroeV Paraphrase and 
Medieval Poetics" on Tuesday, August 6th. Dr. John 
G. Kunstmann, also of the University of North Caro- 
lina, will speak on the topic "On Tubs and Whales— 
From the Psalmist and Alexander the Great to Hein- 
rich Von Kleist" on Thursday, August 8th. The 
public is invited to both lectures which will be given 
at 4:00 p.m. on the dates indicated, in Room 130, 
Karl E. Zener Auditorium, Sociology-Psychology 
Building. 



(2) 



INSIDE NORTH VIETNAM 
On Friday, August 9th at 3 :00 p.m. in Room 130, 
Sociology-Psychology Building-, the Movie INSIDE 
NORTH VIETNAM will be shown by Professor 
Ernst Borinski, Professor of Sociology. INSIDE 
NORTH VIETNAM, an 85 minute film in color, pro- 
vides an account of life in North Vietnam under war 
conditions. Although some sequences were filmed 
during actual bombing attacks. INSIDE NORTH 
VIETNAM gives an intimate picture of the Vietna- 
mese people and includes interviews with some of the 
leaders of North Vietnam, with peasants, workers, 
and with a captured American pilot. INSIDE 
NORTH VIETNAM was filmed by Felix Greene, 
formerly head of the B.B.C. Bureau in New York, 
during a three-and-a-half month visit to North Viet- 
nam as special correspondent for the San Francisco 
Chronicle. 

The public is invited. There is no charge. 



SUMMER FILM SERIES 
Lcs Carbiniers is an unusual anti-war film by 
Director Jean-Luc Godard. In the film the policies of 
nations are reduced to a story of what two men who 
could be of any country find when they go off to war 
amid promises of glory and booty. This film is newly 
released in this country and its recent showings in 
New York City attracted more than usual attention 
for its timely treatment of the human issues of war. 
There will be one showing Friday evening, August 
9th, at 8:00 p.m. in the Biological Sciences Audi- 
torium. 



SUMMER SESSION SOFTBALL LEAGUE 
(Second Term) 



Date: 

Monday, Aug. 5th 

Tuesday, Aug. 6th 



Game : 

Economics vs. Psychology 

Physics vs. Chemistry White 

Chemistry Blue vs. Forestry 
Rebels vs. Physics 
Chemistry White vs. Sociology 
AROD vs. Biochemistry 

Wednesday, Aug. 7th Chemistry White vs. AROD 
Rebels vs. Biochemistry 
Chemistry Blue vs. Sociology 
Biology vs. Physics 

Thursday, Aug. 8th Bye vs. Forestry 

Economics vs. Physics 
Psychology vs. Sociology 
Biology vs. Biochemistry 
Chemistry Blue vs. AROD 
Rebels vs. Chemistry White 

Friday, Aug. 9th Bye vs. Sociology 

Physics vs. Biochemistry 
Forestry vs. AROD 
Economics vs. Chemistry White 
Psychology vs. Rebels 

Saturday, Aug. 10th Bye vs. Economics 

Psychology vs. Forestry 



JAZZ-IN ENTRIES DUE 

Entries for the 1968 "Jazz-In" combo contest 
are due not later than midnight, Monday, August 
12th. The Contest is sponsored by Allied Arts of 
Durham in cooperation with the Durham Junior 
Chamber of Commerce, The Durham Recreation De- 
partment, and Duke University. It will be a fea- 
tured part of the 1968 Durham Summer Festival to 
be held Saturday, August 17th, beginning at 12:00 
noon in Wallace Wade Stadium. 

Additional information concerning the Festival 
and the contest is available for the Allied Arts Cen- 
ter, 810 West Proctor Street, Durham. 



NOTICE 

Summer Session classes will NOT meet on Satur- 
day, August 17th. 

TERM II FINAL EXAMINATION SCHEDULE 



Classes scheduled at : 
7:40-9:00 daily 
1:40-3:00 daily 
9:20-10:40 daily 
11:00-12:20 daily 



Examinations are: 
Friday, August 23rd, 7:40-10:40 a.m. 
Friday, August 23rd, 1:40-4:40 p.m. 
Friday, August 23rd, 7:00-10:00 p.m. 
Saturday, August 24th, 7:40-10:40 a.m. 



The examinations in science courses will be held 
in accordance with a schedule arranged by the de- 
partment concerned on Friday, August 16th. 

Examinations for all short-term courses will be 
on the last scheduled class day. The instructor will 
make the time arrangements. 

All other examinations must be held and taken 
according to the above schedule. 

Any student who desires a report of grades from 
the instructor should leave a self-addressed postal 
card or stamped envelope with the instructor. Grades 
will NOT be given out orally at the Summer Session 
Office. 

MAJOR EXAMINATION FOR M. ED. DEGREE 

Major examination for candidates for the M. Ed. 
degree without thesis will be given Wednesday, Au- 
gust 14th, at 2:00 p.m. Report to Room 124, Allen 
Building. 

OPEN MEETING 

Open meeting for all students in Summer School. 
Of particular interest to those educators who are 
concerned with the teaching of the emotionally dis- 
turbed children. Lecture by Dr. Richard J. Whelan, 
Director of Education at the University of Kansas 
Medical Center, Kansas City, Kansas. General title 
will be, THE UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS CHIL- 
DREN'S REHABILITATION CENTER— A 
STRUCTURED BEHAVIORIST APPROACH. 
Lecture will be held on Friday, August 9, from 3 :00- 
4 :00 p.m. in the Social Science Building, Room 139. 
This lecture is co-sponsored by Wright School, Dur- 
ham, North Carolina, and the Department of Educa- 
tion, Duke University. 



IMPORTANT — Notices for the Duke University Calendar should be submitted 

IN WRITTEN FORM to Room 207 Flowers Building, West Campus not later 

than 5:00 p.m., Tuesday. Extension 2911. 



Duke University 

CALENDAR J 







August 11-18, 1968 



Sunday, August 11 

10:20 a.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Chal- 
lenges in Education." WCHL Chapel Hill. 
Mr. John Newton will discuss "The Shape of 
the Ocean Floor." 

10:30-10:45 a.m. Carillon Recital. Mr. J. Samuel 
Hammond, University Carillonneur. 

11 :00 a.m. University Service of Worship. Univer- 
sity Chapel. Preacher: The Reverend Robert 
A. Davis, Assistant Director, Department of 
Campus Ministry, United Methodist Church, 
Nashville, Tennessee. Sermon: "The Waiting 
Father." Broadcast over WDNC and WDNC- 
FM. 
4:00-6:00 p.m. International Open House. 2022 

Campus Drive. 
8:30 p.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Chal- 
lenges in Education." WPTF Raleigh. Dr. 
Thomas Vernon will discuss "Is Corporate 
Punishment Legal?" 



Monday, August 12 

2 :00-3 :30 p.m. West Campus Pool open for women. 

2:00-5:30 p.m. Summer Session Recreational Pro- 
gram. Card Gymnasium. 

4 :25-5 :45 p.m. West Campus Pool open for men. 

5 :30 p.m. Summer Session Softball League Games. 

7 :00 p.m. International Folk Dancing. Internation- 
al House. 2022 Campus Drive. 

7:30 p.m. Scottish Folk Dancing. Presbyterian 
Student Center. Alexander Avenue. 

8:15-9:30 p.m. West Campus Pool open to faculty 
members and their families. Faculty children 
must be accompanied by their parents. 



Tuesday, August 13 

2 :00-3 :30 p.m. West Campus Pool open for women. 
2 :00-5 :30 p.m. Summer Session Recreational Pro- 
gram. Card Gymnasium. 



4:00 p.m. Southeastern Institute of Medieval and 
Renaissance Studies Open Lecture: Dr. John 
Tate Lanning. Room 130, Karl E. Zener Au- 
ditorium. Sociology-Psychology Building. 

4 :25-5 :45 p.m. West Campus Pool open for men. 

5 :30 p.m. Summer Session Softball League Games. 

7 :30 p.m. Duplicate Bridge Tournament. Union 
Ballroom. 



Wednesday, August 14 

2 :00-3 :30 p.m. West Campus Pool open for women. 

2 :00-5 :30 p.m. Summer Session Recreational Pro- 
gram. Card Gymnasium. 

4:00 p.m. Graduate English Club. Speaker: Don 
Cameron Allen. Room 208 Flowers Building. 

4:25-5:45 p.m. West Campus Pool open for men. 

7 :00 and 9 :00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page Au- 
ditorium. "MARAT/DE SADE" ("The Per- 
secution and Assassination of Jean-Paul Marat 
as Performed by the Inmates of the Asylum of 
Charenton Under the Direction of the Marquis 
De Sade.") The film version of Peter Brook's 
Royal Shakespeare Company production of the 
Peter Weiss play. In color. "Even more bril- 
liant than the play. An exhilarating experi- 
ence! Extraordinary impact!" — New Yorker 
Magazine. 



Thursday, August 15 

12 :30 p.m. Kappa Delta Pi Luncheon Meeting. Union 
Ballroom. 

2 :00-3 :30 p.m. West Campus Pool open for women. 

2:00-5:30 p.m. Summer Session Recreational Pro- 
gram. Card Gymnasium. 

4:00 p.m. Southeastern Institute of Medieval and 
Renaissance Studies Open Lecture: Dr. Jean- 
Claude Margolin. Room 130, Karl E. Zener 
Auditorium, Sociology-Psychology Building. 



4:25-5:45 p.m. "West Campus Pool open for men. 

5:30 p.m. Summer Session Softball League Games. 

7:00 p.m. Experimental Seminar. "Violence in 
America." Celestial Omnibus. 

8 :15-9 :30 p.m. West Campus Pool open to faculty- 
members and their families. Faculty children 
must be accompanied by their parents. 



Friday, August 16 

2 .00-3 :30 p.m. West Campus Pool open for women. 

2 .-00-5 :30 p.m. Summer Session Recreational Pro- 
gram. Card Gymnasium. 

4 :25-5 :45 p.m. West Campus Pool open for men. 

5 :30 p.m. Summer Session Softball League Make-up 
Games. 

8:00 p.m. Summer Film Series: "SINGIN' IN THE 
RAIN" starring Gene Kelly, Donald O'Con- 
nor, Debbie Reynolds, Jean Hagen, Cyd Cha- 
risse. A charming musical which combines 
nostalgia and sentiment — a spoof on the styles 
and manners of the late 20 's when movies were 
having problems changing to sound. The high- 
point of the film is the title number danced 
and sung by Gene Kelly. Biological Sciences 
Auditorium. 

8:30 p.m. Open House. Card Gymnasium. 



Saturday, August 17 

9:55 a.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Chal- 
lenges in Education." WDNC Durham. Mr. 
John Newton will discuss "The Shape of the 
Ocean Floor." 

12:00 noon Durham Summer Festival. Wallace 

Wade Stadium. 
2 :00-3 :30 p.m. West Campus Pool open for women. 
4 :25-5 :45 p.m. West Campus Pool open for men. 
5 :30 p.m. Summer Session Softball League Make-up 

Games. 



Sunday, August 18 

10 :20 a.m. Duke University Radio Program, ' ' Chal- 
lenges in Education." WCHL Chapel Hill. 
Dr. Erdman B. Palmore will discuss "Of Peo- 
ple and Aging." 

10:30-10:45 a.m. Carillon Recital. Mr. J. Samuel 
Hammond, University Carillonneur. 

11 :00 a.m. University Service of Worship. Univer- 
sity Chapel. Preacher: Dr. Charles A. Rice, 
Duke Divinity School. Broadcast over WDNC 
and WDNC-FM. 
4:00-6:00 p.m. International Open House. 2022 
Campus Drive. 



8:30 p.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Chal- 
lenges in Education." WPTF Raleigh. Dr. 
J. H. Phillips will discuss "Churches and Sex 
Education." 



UNIVERSITY SERVICE OF WORSHIP 
The Reverend Robert A. Davis, Assistant Direc- 
tor, Department of Campus Ministry, United Meth- 
odist Church, Nashville, Tennessee will deliver the 
sermon at the University Service of Worship on Sun- 
day, August 11th. Departing from the early morn- 
ing summer schedule, the service will be held at the 
usual hour of 11 :00 a.m. The coffee hour will be dis- 
continued and this eleven o'clock schedule for the 
Sunday Service of Worship will continue for the 
rest of the summer. 



DUPLICATE BRIDGE TOURNAMENT 
There will be a Duplicate Bridge Tournament in 
the air-conditioned Union Ballroom on Tuesday, Au- 
gust 13th, at 7 :30 p.m. All members of the university 
are welcome to attend. Prizes will be awarded to the 
first and second place winners of both North and 
South, East and West. This will be the final bridge 
tournament of the 1968 Summer Session, so be sure 
to attend ! 



GRADUATE ENGLISH CLUB 
Don Cameron Allen, Sir William Osier Professor 
of English Literature at Johns Hopkins University 
will expound upon and answer questions about his 
recently published book, The Ph.D. in English and 
American Literature, on Wednesday, August 14th, at 
4:00 p.m. in Room 208 Flowers Building. The pub- 
lic is invited. 



KAPPA DELTA PI LUNCHEON MEETING 
The Alpha Tau Chapter of Kappa Delta Pi, honor 
society in education, will hold its final meeting of 
the summer session in the West Union Ballroom on 
Thursday, August 8th, at 12:30 p.m. 

Speaker for the occasion will be Dr. Ernst Borin- 
ski, visiting professor at Duke. He will speak on 
' ' Student Rights and Student Freedoms : Politics and 
Students." 



VIOLENCE IN AMERICA SEMINAR 
The final evening of the Violence in America 
Seminar will be Thursday, August 15th. The pro- 
gram will be a staged reading of excerpts from Peter 



(2) 



Weiss' play, The Persecution and Assassination of 
Jean-Paul Marat as Performed by the Inmates of the 
Asylum at Charenton under the Direction of the 
Marquis de Sade. The time is 7 :00 p.m., the place is 
the Celestial Omnibus coffee house, beneath Flowers 
Lounge. The entire community is invited. 



OPEN HOUSE 



All University people are invited to attend the 
Open House in Card Gymnasium on Friday, August 
16th, at 8 :30 p.m. (no children please). Not only will 
badminton, ping-pong, bridge, swimming, and a free 
juke box be available, but ice cold watermelon will 
be served to all participants. This will be the final 
Open House of the 1968 Summer Session. 



DURHAM SUMMER FESTIVAL 

This summer's repeat of last year's highly suc- 
cessful "Jazz-In" is being offered by Allied Arts in 
cooperation with the Durham Junior Chamber of 
Commerce, the Durham Recreation Department, and 
Duke University, as a feature event in the 1968 Dur- 
ham Summer Festival, Saturday, August 17th, at 
12:00 noon, in Wallace Wade Stadium at Duke Uni- 
versity. In case of rain, the Festival, including the 
"Jazz-In," will be held on Sunday, August 18th. 



INSTITUTE ON THE TEACHING OF NEGRO 
HISTORY FEATURES OPEN LECTURES 

The National Foundation on the Arts and Hu- 
manities will sponsor an institute at Duke from Mon- 
day, August 19th to Saturday, August 24th for col- 
lege and university teachers on the general subject 
of the teaching of the history of the American Ne- 
gro. Although the regular sessions of the institute will 
be limited to participants, two lectures will be open 
to the public without charge. 

The first lecture will be given on Tuesday, August 
20th, at 8 :00 p.m. in Room 130 Sociology-Psychology 
Building by Dr. J. Saunders Redding, author of No 
Day of Triumph, Being Negro in America, and nu- 
merous other books and presently Director of the 
Division of Research and Publication in the office 
of the National Foundation on the Arts and Humani- 
ties. His topic will be "The Humanities and the 
Commonweal: the Development of Attitudes and 
Ideas Leading to the Present Situation in Black- 
White Relations." The second lecture will be given 
on Thursday, August 22nd at 8:00 p.m. in Room 
111 Biology Building by Professor Louis Harlan of 
the University of Maryland, editor of the Booker T. 
Washington papers, who will speak on the "Secret 
Life of Booker T. Washington." 



NOTICE 

Summer Session classes will NOT meet on Sat- 
urday, August 17th. 



TERM II FINAL EXAMINATION SCHEDULE 
Classes scheduled at: Examinations are: 

Friday, August 23rd, 7:40-10:40 A.M. 
Friday, August 23rd, 1:40-4:40 P.M. 
Friday, August 23rd, 7:00-10:00 P.M. 
Saturday, August 24th, 7:40-10:40 A.M. 



7:40-9:00 daily 
1:40-3:00 daily 
9:20-10:40 daily 
11:00-12:20 daily 



The examinations in science courses will be held 
in accordance with a schedule arranged by the depart- 
ment concerned on Friday, August 16th. 

Examinations for all short-term courses will be on 
the last scheduled class day. The instructor will 
make the time arrangements. 

All other examinations must be held and taken 
according to the above schedule. 

Any student who desires a report of grades from 
the instructor should leave a self-addressed postal 
card or stamped envelope with the instructor. Grades 
will NOT be given out orally at the Summer Session 
Office. 



MAJOR EXAMINATION FOR M.ED. DEGREE 

Major examination for candidates for the M.Ed, 
degree without thesis will be given Wednesday, Au- 
gust 14th, at 2:00 p.m. Report to Room 124, Allen 
Building. 



SUMMER SESSION SOFTBALL LEAGUE 
(SECOND TERM) 



Date: 

Monday, Aug. 12th 



Tuesday, Aug. 13th 



Thursday, Aug. 15th 



Friday, Aug. 16th 
Saturday, Aug. 17th 



Game: 

Bye vs. Biochemistry 
Sociology vs. AEOD 
Forestry vs. Rebels 
Economics vs. Chemistry Blue 
Psychology vs. Biology 

Bye vs. AEOD 

Biochemistry vs. Chemistry White 

Sociology vs. Rebels 

Physics vs. Chemistry Blue 

Forestry vs. Biology 

Bye vs. Chemistry White 
AROD vs. Rebels 
Biochemistry vs. Chemistry Blue 
Sociology vs. Biology 
Physics vs. Psychology 

Make-up Games 

Make-up Games 



IMPORTANT — Notices for the Duke University Calendar should be submitted 

IN WRITTEN FORM to Room 207 Flowers Building, West Campus not later 

than 5:00 p.m., Tuesday. Extension 2911. 



Duke University 



ALENDAR 




August 18-25, 1968 



Sunday, August 18 

10:20 a.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Chal- 
lenges in Education." WCHL Chapel Hill. 
Dr. Erdman B. Palmore will discuss "Of Peo- 
ple and Aging." 

10:30-10:45 a.m. Carillon Recital. Mr. J. Samuel 
Hammond, University Carillonneur. 

11 :00 a.m. University Service of Worship. Univer- 
sity Chapel. Preacher: The Reverend Dr. 
Charles A. Rogers, Assistant Professor of His- 
torical Theology, Duke Divinity School. Ser- 
mon : ' ' Where is the Church ? ' ' Broadcast over 
WDNC and WDNC-FM. 
4:00-6:00 p.m. International Open House. 2022 

Campus Drive. 
8:30 p.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Chal- 
lenges in Education." WPTF Raleigh. Dr. 
J. H. Phillips will discuss "Churches and Sex 
Education." 

Monday, August 19 

9 :00 a.m. The final examination of Mr. James Wil- 
son Holsinger, Jr. for the Ph.D. degree in 
Anatomy. Room M403 Davison Building. 

2 :00 p.m. The final examination of Mr. James Ray- 
mond Lord for the Ph.D. degree in Religion. 
Room 210 Divinity School. 

2:00 p.m. The final examination of Mr. Douglas 
William Webbink for the Ph.D. degree in Eco- 
nomics. Room 306 Social Science Building. 

2 :00-3 :30 p.m. West Campus Pool open for women. 

2:00-5:30 p.m. Summer Session Recreational Pro- 
gram. Card Gymnasium. 

4:25-5:45 p.m. West Campus Pool open for men. 

5 :30 p.m. Summer Session Softball League Make-up 
Games. 

7 :00 p.m. International Folk Dancing. Internation- 
al House. 2022 Campus Drive. 



7:30 p.m. Scottish Folk Dancing. Presbyterian 
Student Center. Alexander Avenue. 

8:15-9:30 p.m. West Campus Pool open to faculty 
members and their families. Faculty children 
must be accompanied by their parents. 



Tuesday, August 20 

Department of Physiology Symposium : Molec- 
ular Basic Membrane Function. Statler Hil- 
ton. 

9 :00 a.m. The final examination of Mr. Calvin Jun- 
ior Roetzel for the Ph.D. degree in Religion. 
Room 210 Divinity School. 

2 :00-3 :30 p.m. West Campus Pool open for women. 

2 :00-5 :30 p.m. Summer Session Recreational Pro- 
gram. Card Gymnasium. 

4:00 p.m. Southeastern Institute of Medieval and 
Renaissance Studies Open Lecture : Dr. Lewis 
W. Spitz. Room 130, Karl E. Zener Auditori- 
um, Sociology-Psychology Building. 

4 :25-5 :45 p.m. West Campus Pool open for men. 

5:30 p.m. Summer Session Softball League Game: 
All Stars vs. Champions. 

8 :00 p.m. Institute on the Teaching of Negro His- 
tory : Dr. J. Saunders Redding. Karl E. Zener 
Auditorium, Room 130 Sociology-Psychology 
Building. 



Wednesday, August 21 

Department of Physiology Symposium: Molec- 
ular Basic Membrane Function. Statler Hil- 
ton. 
2:00 p.m. The final examination of Mr. Rudolph 
Wilhelm Krutzen for the Ph.D. degree in Phi- 
losophy. Room 201-B West Duke Building. 



2:00-3:30 p.m. West Campus Pool open for women. 
2:00-5:30 p.m. Summer Session Recreational Pro- 
gram. Card Gymnasium. 
4 :25-5 :45 p.m. West Campus Pool open for men. 



Thursday, August 22 

Department of Physiology Symposium : Molec- 
ular Basic Membrane Function. Statler Hil- 
ton. 

2 -.00-3 :30 p.m. West Campus Pool open for women. 

2:00-5:30 p.m. Summer Session Recreational Pro- 
gram. Card Gymnasium. 

4 :25-5 :45 p.m. West Campus Pool open for men. 

8 :00 p.m. Institute on the Teaching of Negro His- 
tory : Professor Louis Harlan. Room 130, Karl 
E. Zener Auditorium, Sociology-Psychology 
Building. 

8:15-9:30 p.m. West Campus Pool open to faculty 
members and their families. Faculty children 
must be accompanied by their parents. 



Friday, August 23 

Department of Physiology Symposium : Molec- 
ular Basic Membraue Function. Statler Hil- 
ton. 

2 :00-3 :30 p.m. West Campus Pool open for women. 

2:00-5:30 p.m. Summer Session Recreational Pro- 
gram. Card Gymnasium. 

4 :25-5 :45 p.m. West Campus Pool open for men. 



Saturday, August 24 

9:55 a.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Chal- 
lenges in Education." WDNC Durham. Dr. 
Erdman B. Palmore will discuss "Of People 
and Aging." 

2 :00-3 :30 p.m. West Campus Pool open for women. 

4:25-5:45 p.m. West Campus Pool open for men. 



Sunday, August 25 

10:20 a.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Chal- 
lenges in Education." WCHL Chapel Hill. 
Dr. Robert Colver will discuss "Strengthening 
Developing Colleges." 



10:30-10:45 a.m. Carillon Recital. Mr. J. Samuel 
Hammond, University Carillonneur. 

11 :00 a.m. Recess Chapel Service. University Chap- 
el. Preacher: The Reverend Dr. Howard C. 
Wilkinson, Chaplain to the University. Broad- 
cast over WDNC and WDNC-FM. 
4:00-6:00 p.m. International Open House. 2022 

Campus Drive. 
S:30 p.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Chal- 
lenges in Education." WPTF Raleigh. Dr. 
Ralph Brauer will discuss "Experiments in a 
High Pressure Environment." 



UNIVERSITY SERVICE OF WORSHIP 
The Reverend Dr. Charles A. Rogers, Assistant 
Professor of Historical Theology in the Divinity 
School, will deliver the sermon at the University Ser- 
vice of Worship on Sunday, August 18th. Depart- 
ing from the early morning schedule, the service will 
be held at the usual hour of 11 :00 a.m. The coffee 
hour will be discontinued and this eleven o'clock 
schedule for the Sunday Service of Worship will 
continue for the rest of the summer. 

RECESS CHAPEL SERVICES 

Sunday, August 25th 

11 :00 a.m. The Reverend Dr. Howard C. Wilkin- 
son, Chaplain to the University. 

Sunday, September 1st 

11:00 a.m. The Reverend Elmer O. Hall, Assis- 
tant Chaplain to the University. 

Sunday, September 8th 

11:00 a.m. The Reverend Dr. Howard C. Wilkin- 
son, Chaplain to the University. 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. James Wilson Hol- 
singer, Jr. for the Ph.D. degree in Anatomy will be 
held on Monday, August 19th at 9 :00 a.m. in Room 
M403 Davison Building. The subject of Mr. Hol- 
singer's dissertation is "Hypothalamic And Ovarian 
Thresholds For Ovulation At Varying Times In The 
Rat Estrous Cycle." 

The committee to conduct the examination con- 
sists of Professors John W. Everett, Kenneth Duke, 
Talmage Peele, John Buettner-Januseh and George 
Somjen. Professor Everett will preside. 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 
The final examination of Mr. James Raymond 
Lord for the Ph.D. degree in Religion will be held on 



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Monday, August 19th at 2:00 p.m. in Room 210 Divin- 
ity. The subject of Mr. Lord's dissertation is "Ab- 
raham: A Study In Ancient Jewish And Christian 
Interpretation. ' ' 

The committee to conduct the examination con- 
sists of Professors James Price, Kenneth Clark, Egil 
Grislis, William Stinespring and C. H. "Womble. Pro- 
fessor Price will preside. 



PINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. Douglas William 
Webbink for the Ph.D. degree in Economics will be 
held on Monday, August 19th at 2:00 p.m. in Room 
306 Social Science Building. The subject of Mr. 
Webbink 's dissertation is "The All-Channel Tele- 
vision Receiver Law And The Future Of Ultra-High 
Frequency Television." 

The committee to conduct the examination con- 
sists of Professors Joseph J. Spengler, William P. 
Yohe, John M. Vernon and Hugh Hall. Professor 
Spengler will preside. 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. Calvin Junior Roet- 
zel for the Ph.D. degree in Religion will be held on 
Tuesday, August. 20th at 9 :00 a.m. in Room 210 Divin- 
ity. The subject of Mr. Roetzel's dissertation is "The 
Church And Judgment In The Pauline Epistles." 

The committee to conduct the examination consists 
of Professors James Price, Moody Smith, William 
Stinespring and Francis Newton. Professor Price 
will preside. 



MEDIEVAL AND RENAISSANCE STUDIES 
In the final session of the Southeastern Institute 
of Medieval and Renaissance Studies, part of the 
Duke-UNC Cooperative Program in the Humanities, 
Dr. Lewis W. Spitz of Stanford University will speak 
on "Luther's Anthropological Realism" on Tuesday. 
August 20th. The public is invited to the lecture 
which will be given at 4:00 p.m. in Room 130. Karl 
E. Zener Auditorium, Sociology-Psychology Building. 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. Rudolph Wilhelm 
Krutzen for the Ph.D. degree in Philosophy will be 
held on Wednesday, August 21st at 2 :00 p.m. in Room 
201-B West Duke Building. The subject of Mr. 
Krutzen 's dissertation is "Explanation In History." 

The committee to conduct the examination con- 
sists of Professors Bernard Peach, Paul Welsh, Neil 
Wilson and Joel Smith. Professor Peach will pre- 
side. 



SUMMER SESSION SOFTBALL LEAGUE 
(SECOND TERM) 
Date : Game : 

Monday, Aug. 19th Make-up Games 

Tuesday, Aug. 20th All Stars vs. Champions 



INSTITUTE ON THE TEACHING OF NEGRO 
HISTORY FEATURES OPEN LECTURES 
The National Foundation on the Arts and Hu- 
manities will sponsor an institute at Duke from Mon- 
day, August 19th to Saturday, August 24th for col- 
lege and university teachers on the general subject of 
the teaching of the history of the American Negro. 
Although the regular session of the institute will be 
limited to participants, two lectures will be open to the 
public without charge. 

The first lecture will be given on Tuesday, Au- 
gust 20th, at 8 :00 p.m. in the Karl E. Zener Auditori- 
um, Room 130 Sociology-Psychology Building by 
Dr. J. Saunders Redding, author of No Day of Tri- 
umph, Bring Negro in America, and numerous other 
books and presently Director of the Division of Re- 
search and Publication in the office of the National 
Foundation on the Arts and Humanities. His topic 
will be "The Humanities and the Commonweal: the 
Development of Attitudes and Ideas Leading to the 
Present Situation in Black- White Relations." The 
second lecture will be given on Thursday, August 
22nd at 8 :00 p.m. in Room 130. Karl E. Zener Audi- 
torium, Sociology-Psychology Building by Professor 
Louis Harlan of the University of Maryland, editor 
of the Booker T. Washington papers, who will speak 
on the "Secret Life of Booker T. Washington." 



FINAL ISSUE OF THE UNIVERSITY 
CALENDAR FOR THE SUMMER SESSIONS 
This copy of the Duke University Calendar will 
be the final issue until the opening of the fall term. 
Publication for the 1968-69 academic year will be re- 
sumed with the issue distributed on Friday, Septem- 
ber 13th for the period of September 15th-22nd. An- 
nouncements to be included in this issue should be 
sent in written form to the calendar office, 207 Flow- 
ers Building, no later than 5 :00 p.m. Tuesday, Sep- 
tember 10th. 



TERM II FINAL EXAMINATION SCHEDULE 
Classes scheduled at: Examinations are: 
7:40-9:00 daily Friday, Aug. 23rd, 7:40-10:40 a.m. 

1:40-3:00 daily Friday, Aug. 23rd, 1:40-4:40 p.m. 

9:20-10:40 daily Friday, Aug. 23rd, 7:00-10:00 p.m. 

11:00-12:20 daily Saturday, Aug. 24th, 7:40-10:40 a.m. 

Any student who desires a report of grades from 
the instructor should leave a self-addressed postal 
card or stamped envelope with the instructor. Grades 
will NOT be given out orally at the Summer Session 
Office. 



IMPORTANT— Notices for the Duke University Calendar should be submitted 

IN WRITTEN FORM to Room 207 Flowers Building, West Campus not later 

than 5:00 p.m., Tuesday. Extension 2911. 



Duke University 



ALENDAR 




.Sept. 15-22, 1968 



Sunday, September 15 

9:30 a.m. Inter- faith Dramatic Presentation for all 
new students. Page Auditorium. 
10:20 a.m. Duke University Radio Program. "Chal- 
lenges in Education." WCHL Chapel Hill. Dr. 
Tom Graham will discuss "Heart Function 
Studies." 
10:30-10:45 a.m. Carillon Recital. .Air. J. Samuel 

Hammond, University Carillonneur. 
11 :00 a.m. University Service of Worship. Univer- 
sity Chapel. Preacher : The Reverend Dr. How- 
ard C. Wilkinson, Chaplain to the University. 
Sermon: "Sunday Worship in Duke Chapel." 
Broadcast over WDNC and WDNC-FM. 

3:00 p.m. International Open House. 2022 Campus 
Drive. 

5:00-6:30 p.m. Co-ed picnic for all new students 
sponsored by the YMCA and YWCA. Duke 
Gardens, West Campus. 

6:30-7:30 p.m. Freshman Vesper Service. Duke 
Gardens, West Campus. 

8:00 p.m. Faculty panel discussion of Report of the 
National Advisory Commission of Civil Dis- 
order. Baldwin Auditorium. 

8:30 p.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Chal- 
lenges in Education." WPTF Raleigh. Dr. 
Robert Colver will discuss "Strengthening De- 
veloping Colleges. ' ' 

9 :00-ll :00 p.m. Student-Faculty Discussions. Par- 
lors of East Campus Dormitories. 



Monday, September 16 

9 :00 a.m. Assembly for Trinity College freshmen. 
Page Auditorium. 

9 :00 a.m. Assembly for School of Engineering fresh- 
men. Page Auditorium. 

2 :00 p.m. The final examination of Mr. Larry Wayne 
Watson for the Ed.D. degree in Education. 
Room 08A West Duke Building. 

4 :00 p.m. Seminar in Electron Microscopy. Room 
M-312 Davison Building. 



7 :00 and 9 :00 p.m. Duke Players Performance : ' ' The 
Lesson." Branson Hall. 

7 :30 p.m. Open Poetry Reading. Epworth House, 

East Campus. 

8 :00 p.m. Panel discussion sponsored by The School 

of Nursing on Victor Frankl's A Search for 
Meaning. Hospital Amphitheater. 



Tuesday, September 17 

8 :30 a.m. Assembly for all freshmen. Page Audi- 
torium. 

9:00 p.m. Duke Player's Performance: "The Les- 
son." Branson Hall. 
10:30 p.m. House Meetings. 



Wednesday, September 18 

8 :00 p.m. University Convocation. Indoor Stadium. 



Thursday, September 19 

8 :10 a.m. Fall semester classes begin. 
10 :00 a.m. Divinity School Opening Convocation. 

University Chapel. Speaker: Dean Robert E. 

Cushman. 
10 :30 a.m.-l :00 p.m. Picnic : Newcomers Club of the 

University Campus Club. Program : Informal 

Orientation of Children's Activities in the area. 

3 :00 p.m. The final examination of Mr. Kelly Gray 

Shaver for the Ph.D. degree in Psychology. 
Room 222 Psychology-Sociology Building. 

4 :00-6 :00 p.m. Inter- Varsity Christian Fellowship 

picnic. Hanes Field behind Southgate Dormi- 
tory on East Campus. 
7 :30 p.m. School of Nursing Capping Ceremony. 
University Chapel. 



Friday, September 20 

10:00 a.m. Divinity School Chapel Service. Univer- 
sity Chapel. Service of Holy Communion. Cel- 
ebrant: Dean Robert E. Cushman. 

2:30 p.m. The final examination of Mr. Frederick 
Evan Henoch for the Ph.D. degree in Chemis- 
try. Room 303 Chemistry Building. 

3 :30 p.m. Chemistry Staff Seminar. Room 01 Chem- 
istry Building. 

5 :30 p.m. Church Night for all new students under 
the auspices of denominational groups. 

5:30 p.m. Hillel Sabbath Open House. East Cam- 
pus Center. 

8:00-10:30 p.m. University Christian Movement 
Film Showing. Page Auditorium. 



Saturday, September 21 

9:55 a.m. Duke University Radio Program. "Chal- 
lenges in Education." WDNC Durham. Dr. 
Tom Graham will discuss "Heart Function 
Studies." 

7 :00 and 9 :00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page Au- 
ditorium. "ZORBA THE GREEK" with An- 
thony Quinn, Alan Bates, and Irene Papas. 
"Anthony Quinn 's Zorba in this tempestuous 
picture possesses all the energies and urges of 
the great ones of history and myth. He is Adam 
in the Garden of Eden, Odysseus on the windy 
plains of Troy. He is a bit of Nijinsky and a 
good bit of Tom Jones!" — Crowther, N. Y. 
Times. "The director. Michael Cacoyannis, is 
a film genius who has realized all the grandeur 
of the novel." — Cook, World Telegram. 

7:30 p.m. Varsity Football: Duke vs. South Caro- 
lina. Columbia. South Carolina. 



Sunday, September 22 

9 :30 a.m. Chapel Choir Rehearsal. University 
Chapel. 

10:20 a.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Chal- 
lenges in Education." WCHL Chapel Hill. 
Dr. Jack Blanton will discuss "The Gulf 
Stream Boundary." 

10:30-10:45 a.m. Carillon Recital. Mr. J. Samuel 
Hammond. University Carillonneur. 

11 :00 a.m. University Service of Worship. Univer- 
sity Chapel. Preacher: The Reverend Profes- 
sor James T. Cleland, Dean of the Chapel. 
Broadcast over WDNC and WDNC-FM. 
4:00-6:00 p.m. International Open House. 2022 

Campus Drive. 
7 :00 and 9 :00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page Au- 
ditorium. "ZORBA THE GREEK" with An- 
thony Quinn, Alan Bates, and Irene Papas. 



"Anthony Quinn 's Zorba in this tempestuous 
picture possesses all the energies and urges of 
the great ones of history and myth. He is 
Adam in the Garden of Eden, Odysseus on the 
windy plains of Troy. He is a bit of Nijinsky 
and a good bit of Tom Jones!" — -Crowther, 
N. Y. Times. "The director, Michael Cacoyan- 
nis, is a film genius who has realized all the 
grandeur of the novel." — Cook, World Tele- 
gram. 
8:30 p.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Chal- 
lenges in Education." WPTF Raleigh. Dr. 
John Costlow will discuss "A Marine Lab for 
All." 



CHAPEL CHOIR— FRESHMAN SUNDAY 
All students interested in singing in the Chapel 
Choir are invited to sing in the choir for the morning 
Service of Worship on Freshman Sunday, September 
15th. Rehearsals are scheduled in the Chapel Satur- 
day, September 14th. 4:00-5:00 p.m. and Sunday, 
September 15th, 9 :30 a.m. No audition is required 
for this service. 



CHAPEL CHOIR AUDITIONS 
Auditions will be held on September 16-18th 
(Monday- Wednesday) for membership in the Chapel 
Choir for the current academic year. All interested 
singers are welcome — students, faculty and residents 
of the Triangle Area. Please call 684-3898 for an ap- 
pointment for an audition. 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE ED.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. Larry Wayne Wat- 
son for the Ed.D. degree in Education will be held on 
Monday, September 16th at 2 :00 p.m. in Room 08A 
West Duke Building. The subject of Mr. Watson's 
dissertation is "The Relationship Of The Mathemati- 
cal Course Work Of Teachers And The SAT-M Scores 
Of Their Students." 

The committee to conduct the examination con- 
sists of Professors Olan Petty, W. H. Cartwright. 
Henry Sublett, Allan Hurlburt and Thomas Reyn- 
olds. Professor Petty will preside. 



SEMINAR IN ELECTRON MICROSCOPY 
Dr. Robert Goyer of the Department of Pathology 
at the University of North Carolina will lead a semi- 
nar on Monday. September 16th at 4:00 p.m. in Room 
M-312 Davison Building. His topic is "Morphologic 
Transformations in Kidney Mitochondria." Refresh- 
ments will be served from 3 :45-4 :00 p.m. 



UNIVERSITY CONVOCATION 
The Fifth Annual University Convocation offi- 
cially opening the academic year 1968-69 will be held 
on Wednesday evening, September 18th at 8:00 p.m. 
in the Indoor Stadium. 



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Dr. Knight will deliver an address entitled "Be- 
yond Revolt : Renaissance and Reformation in the 
American University." A procession of student offi- 
cers and members of the faculties will begin promptly 
at 8 :00 p.m. Special music will be rendered by the 
University Concert Band under the direction of Pro- 
fessor Paul Bryan. 

All members of the University Community and 
their families are invited to attend. 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. Kelly Gray Shaver 
for the Ph.D. degree in Psychology will be held on 
Thursday, September 19th at 3:00 p.m. in Room 222 
Psychology/ Sociology Bldg. The subject of Mr. Sha- 
ver's dissertation is "The Effects Of Relevance And 
Severity On The Attribution Of Responsibility For 
Accidents." 

The committee to conduct the examination consists 
of Professors Edward E. Jones, John C. Altrocchi, 
Darwyn E. Linder, Harold Sehiffman and William 
E. Wilkinson. Professor Jones will preside. 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. Frederick Evan Hen- 
och for the Ph.D. degree in Chemistry will be held 
on Friday, September 20th at 2 :30 p.m. in Room 303 
Chemistry Building. The subject of Mr. Henoch's 
dissertation is "Condensations Of Mono- And Dian- 
ions Of Hydrazones And Related Compounds." 

The committee to conduct the examination con- 
sists of Professors C. R. Hauser, P. W. Jeffs, Pelham 
Wilder, Jr., Frances C. Brown and Henry Kamin. 
Professor Hauser will preside. 



CHEMISTRY STAFF SEMINAR 
Dr. Smith L. Holt of the Department of Chemistry 
at the Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn will speak at 
the Chemistry Staff Seminar on Friday, September 
20th at 3 :30 p.m. in Room 01 of the Chemistry Build- 
ing. 

The subject of Dr. Holt's address will be "The 
Electronic Structure of Transition Metal Ions in High 
Oxidation States." 

All interested persons are cordially invited to at- 
tend. 



"CHURCH NIGHT" SCHEDULE 
Friday, September 20, has been designated as 
"Church Night," and most of the religious groups 
which are related to particular denominations will be 
conducting programs designed to orient students who 
identify with those particular denominations. Those 
who, at press time, had submitted their plans are as 
follows: 

Episcopal — Buffet supper and mixer, 5:30-7:30, to be held 
at the Episcopal Center, on Alexander Street, one-half block 
north of Campus Drive. 



Jewish — A Hillel-Sabbath Open House will be held at the 
East Campus Center, on East Campus, beginning at 5:30. 

Methodist — A hamburger cook-out will begin at 5:30 at 
the Methodist Center, on Oregon Street, a half-block north of 
Campus Drive. 

Presbyterian — Dinner will be served at 5:30 at Westminster 
House, on Alexander Street, a half-block north of Campus 
Drive. Dinner will be followed by a service of worship. 

Roman Catholic — Special buses will be at West Campus and 
at the East Campus circle at 5:30 to take students to the 
Immaculate Conception Church, 810 West Chapel Hill Street, 
where dinner will be served. 

NOTE: There is a Baptist Student Center on Alexander 
Street, a half-block north of Campus Drive, and it is antici- 
pated that a Baptist Chaplain will be named in the near future, 
so that there will be a program for Baptist students. An- 
nouncements pertaining to Baptist students will be made short- 
ly. The Lutheran Student Foundation rents the use of a por- 
tion of the Methodist Center, and the new Lutheran Chaplain 
will soon arrive and announce his plans for Lutheran students. 
The United Campus Christian Fellowship usually meets in the 
homes of various Duke professors. Announcements concerning 
this will appear shortly. Other groups, such as the Friends, 
Greek Orthodox, Christian Science and Mormons, will contact 
their students about their plans. 



STUDENT UNION ART EXHIBITION 
JAPANESE WOODBLOCK COLOR PRINTS 

An exhibition of 77 Japanese Woodblock Color 
Prints from the collection of Mr. and Mrs. Albert J. 
Kirkpatrick of New York City will open in the West 
Union Lounge on Sunday, September 15th. The Stu- 
dent Union Graphic Arts Committee invites the pub- 
lic to this initial showing. Many of the prints will 
be offered for sale during the time the exhibit will 
be on display (September 15-October 15 from 8:00 
a.m.-10:00 p.m.) 

The Kirkpatrick 's have been collecting Japanese 
prints for more than 30 years in many parts of the 
United States as well as in Europe and the Orient, 
A large part of their collection of some 1500 prints 
comes from Japan and from the ateliers of the artists. 

The Boston Museum of Fine Arts, the Brooklyn 
Museum, the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Art in 
Philadelphia as well as galleries in New York City 
and in Washington, D. C. have acquired outstanding 
prints from this collection. The owners have given 
exhibitions at a number of colleges in Georgia and 
Florida, in the Garden Center at Rich's in Atlanta, 
and at the Columbus Museum of Arts and Crafts. 

The selection to be shown at Duke University rep- 
resents a cross-section of the whole collection and con- 
fines itself to Hanga prints, those of the first half 
of the 20th Century. Landscapes, Kunadori (actor 
make-up), Actor Portraits, Bijin (female beauties 
and Kua Cho (similar to our still life) will be in- 
cluded, these being the styles in which the Japanese 
artist traditionally expresses himself. There are, 
however, some examples of the abstract design so 
favored by the contemporary artist, on display. 

The 26 artists represented will feature the works 
of the Yoshida family, Hasui, Shinsui, Shunsen, Tad- 
amasa, Shiro and Tomikickir5 among others whose 
names may be less familiar to Western art lovers. 

On October 3rd Mr. and Mrs. Kirkpatrick will give 
an informal gallery talk on the collection, bringing 



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for this purpose a special selection of Ukiyo-e prints 
of the 19th Century, showing works by Hokusai, Hiro- 
shige i, Utamaro, Kunisada and Toyokini. They will 
also present some over-size prints and variations of 
the standard Oban size. 



DUKE CHAPEL PREACHING SCHEDULE, 
FALL SEMESTER, 1968-69 

September 

15 — Freshman Sunday — Eev. Dr. Howard C. Wilkinson, 

Chaplain to the University 
22— Opening Sunday— Eev. Prof. James T. Cleland, Dean of 

the Chapel 
29 — Eev. Dr. Waldo Beach, Professor of Christian Ethics 

October 

6 — World Communion — Dean Cleland; Chaplain Wilkinson, 
Celebrant 
13 — Homecoming — Bishop Earl G. Hunt, Jr., Presiding 

Bishop, Charlotte Area, United Methodist Church 
20 — Eev. Prof. Eobert E. Cushman, Dean of the Divinity 

School 
27 — Eev. Prof. Thomas A. Langford, Head of the Depart- 
ment of Beligion 

November 

3 — Bishop Eoy D. Nichols, Member, Central Committee, 
World Council of Churces, and Presiding Bishop, Pitts- 
burg Area, United Methodist Church 

10 — Dad's Day — Eev. Dr. David H. C. Bead, Minister, Madi- 
son Ave., Presbyterian Church, New York 

17 — Chaplain Wilkinson 

24 — Thanksgiving — Eev. Dr. McMurry S. Eichey, Chairman, 
Duke University Eeligious Council, and Professor of 
Theology and Christian Nurtur 

December 

1 — Eev. Dr. Frederick Herzog, Professor of Systematic 

Theology 
8 — Founders Day — Dean Cleland 
15 — Christmas Sunday — Bishop William E. Cannon, Presid- 
ing Bishop, Ealeigh Area, United Methodist Church 
22 — Eev. Dr. Creighton Lacy, Professor of World Christi- 
anity 
29 — Eev. Dr. Frank Baker, Professor of English Chinch 
History 

January 

5 — Eev. Dr. D. Moody Smith, Jr., Associate Professor of 
New Testament 
12— Eev. Dr. W. Arthur Kale, Professor of Christian Edu- 
cation 
19 — Eev. Elmer 0. Hall, Assistant Chaplain to the University 
26— Dean Cleland 



1968-69 DUKE ARTISTS SERIES 
Season tickets priced at $13.00, $11.00, and $9.00 
are available in Page Bos Office. A cheek payable to 
Duke University Artists Series should accompany 
orders and should be mailed to Box KM Duke Station, 
Durham, North Carolina. Call 684-4059 for further 
information. All concerts will be held in Page Au- 
ditorium at 8 :15 p.m. 

An open seminar, sponsored by the Student 
Union's Performing Arts Committee, precedes each 
Artist Series Concert. These sessions, which are con- 
ducted by members of the Music Department, begin 
at 7:00 p.m. and allow for a question-answer period. 
All meetings will be held in Room 208 Flowers Build- 



ing, located directly above the Page Auditorium lob- 
by, and are open to the public without charge. 
The 1968-69 Series is as follows: 

Wednesday, November 20, 1968 
The Chamber Symphony op Philadelphia, An- 
shel Brusilow, Conductor. The Chamber Sympho- 
ny of Philadelphia, made up of thirty-six players, 
was founded in 1966 by the brilliant Anshel Brusi- 
low, one of America's foremost young musicians. 
Brusilow resigned as coneertmaster of the great Phil- 
adelphia Orchestra in order to devote himself to a 
tremendous task: the formation and leadership of 
America's only permanent chamber symphony. In 
its inaugural season the orchestra played to live 
audiences of more than one quarter of a million and 
continued its triumphs by a most successful tour 
throughout the U.S. in its second season. The or- 
chestra offers an almost unlimited repertoire playing 
master pieces of the baroque and romantic schools as 
well as introducing compositions by outstanding con- 
temporaries. 

"Probably no music ensemble has settled down 
so quickly and firmly on the American scene as the 
Chamber Symphony of Philadelphia." — N. Y. Times. 

"Wednesday, February 26, 1969 
Goldovsky Grand Opera Theater presenting 
"Carmen". Bizet's "Carmen" in English performed 
by a company of seventy is another demonstration of 
opera as living theater by the new expanded Goldov- 
sky Opera Theater under the artistic direction of 
Boris Goldovsky. The company is now in its 22nd 
year of touring opera to millions of opera lovers 
across the nation. Often called "the perfect opera," 
"Carmen" is also good theater and the music under- 
lines the dramatic situations at every turn. 

"A rousing success, proving that opera in English, 
properly staged, is live and appealing theater!" — 
Newsweek Magazine. 

Wednesday, March 5. 1969 
Clifford Curzon, Pianist. Clifford Curzon, rec- 
ognized as one of Britain's finest pianists and one of 
the greatest pianists of the time, returns to the United 
States in January, 1969 after a two year absence. Ac- 
claimed on his last visit here for "greatness of a 
kind that is forgotten today" (New York Times), Clif- 
ford Curzon has been one of the most welcome of in- 
ternational concert commuters ever since his first con- 
cert here in 1939. After the intervention of the war, 
his "second debut" took place in 1947 with Mitro- 
poulos and the New York Philharmonic. Since then 
Curzon has visited North America regularly, playing 
with the major orchestras, in solo recital, and on na- 
tionwide radio programs such as the Telephone Hour. 
His many recordings have further established him as 
"one of the most remarkable pianists and musicians 
now before the public." 

During his forthcoming American tour, Curzon 
will be heard again as soloist with George Szell and the 
Cleveland Orchestra, both in Cleveland and New 
York, with the Boston Symphony Orchestra and 



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at the Metropolitan Museum in New York. He will 
also be heard in recital at several important edu- 
cational centers. 

Wednesday, March 19, 1969 
The Harkness Ballet. "The Harkness Ballet" 
has earned top flight artistic recognition in its mete- 
oric rise to fame through a combination of leading 
choreographers, composers, and designers as well as 
a company dedicated to excellence. The company is 
headed by Brian Macdonald, director; Donald Sadd- 
ler, associate director; and Jonathan Sternberg, mu- 
sical director. 

The Harkness Ballet is an American company 
which cherishes the great traditions of classical bal- 
let and at the same time presses forward into new 
frontiers of the dance, sponsoring fresh approaches 
to dance techniques, choreography, musical composi- 
tion, and design. To aid in carrying out this program, 
the Rebekah Harkness Foundation has organized the 
Harkness School of Ballet which provides training 
in all aspects of classic and modern techniques. It 
has founded the Harkness House for Ballet Arts in 
New York City where leaders and students in all 
branches of the art of ballet can study together and 
exchange ideas in a home equipped with studios, 
music and dance reference libraries, and a gallery of 
art. It has established a Workshop at Watch Hill, 
Rhode Island, at which artists and dancers can as- 
semble during the summer months and, in the free, 
invigorating environment of the seashore, experiment 
in the creation of new ballets. 

Friday, April 11, 1969 
Shirley Verrett, Mezzo-Soprano. S. Hurok pre- 
sents the brilliant mezzo-soprano Shirley Verrett 
whose superb voice, artistry, and bearing puts her, 
not only in the forefront of American singers, but 
among the finest singers of our time. Her star shines 
brightly on the world's concert stages, at London's 
Royal Opera, Covent Garden, at Milan's La Scala, at 
the Bolshoi in Moscow, and our own Metropolitan 
Opera Company. 



"BROADWAY AT DUKE" 
Student Union Drama Committee Presentations 
The Drama Committee of the Duke University 
Student Union announces its first Drama Series of 
traveling Broadway hits. These presentations by 
national touring companies are part of the Student 
Union's effort to bring the finest professional enter- 
tainment to the University and the entire community. 
Season tickets, which are priced at $11.00, $9.25, 
and $8.00 and are mailed to subscribers, are available 
at considerable savings and entitle holders to three 
exciting evenings of theater: a comedy — an evening 
of one-act plays by Pinter, Brecht, and Tabori — a 
musical. In addition to the price savings, season sub- 
scriptions eliminate the need for standing in ticket 
lines before each production. Season tickets orders 
are now being processed and will be mailed by October 
15th. Single tickets for plays will be available be- 
ginning Wednesday, November 1st. 



All performances will be presented in Page Au- 
ditorium at 8:15 p.m. Opening on Friday, November 
22nd, will be the national touring company's presen- 
tation of "You Know I Can't Hear You When the 
Water's Running," a raucous comedy starring Imo- 
gene Coca and King Donovan. A recent issue of Cue 
magazine noted that the ' ' Robert Anderson quartet of 
bawdy, compassionate, yet searching plays about man 
at sex-play constitutes the funniest show in town." 

The second attraction in the new series will be 
noted actress Viveca Lindfors leading a company of 
four, known as The Strolling Players, in three con- 
temporary one-act plays of particular relevance to 
current times. The lovely Swedish star, who played 
the title role in "Anastasia" on Broadway, later 
starred in New York productions of "Pal Joey," 
"Miss Julie," and "King Lear," will be seen at 
Duke in "The Lovers" by Harold Pinter; "The Man 
and the Dog" by George Tabari; and "The Jewish 
Wife" by Bertholt Brecht. The performance is set 
for Wednesday, February 5th, 1969. 

The final production will be the presentation of 
the Broadway hit show "Man of La Mancha" on 
Friday, February 21st, 1969. The musical, with 
choreography by Jack Cole and score and lyrics by 
Mitch Leigh and Joe Darion, won every prize of the 
Broadway season last year, including those of the 
New York Drama Critics' Circle, Outer Circle, Varie- 
ty Poll and Saturday Review awards. "Man of La 
Mancha" also received five Tony awards. The un- 
embellished story by Dale Wasserman becomes a mu- 
sical masterpiece in the Albert Selden-Hal James pro- 
duction of the work which portrays author Cervantes 
and his tragic hero, Don Quixote, against a harsh 
background of peasant life in the late 16th century in 
Spain. The company which is one of the largest the- 
atrical troupes on tour today, includes such popular 
Broadway favorites as Louis Criscuolo, Seymour Pen- 
zner, Ronn Carroll, Richard Frock, Lynn Carroll, 
Marise Counsell, Edmond Varrato and Mark Ross. 



CHAMBER ARTS SOCIETY 
8 :15 p.m.. Music Room, East Duke Building. Sea- 
son tickets : $12 :50. Single tickets : $2.50. Write Dr. 
Ernest Nelson, Box 6065, College Station. 

Saturday, October 19th 

Concentus Musicus Vienna 
Saturday, November 9th 

Brazilian String Quartet 
Saturday, December 7th 

Hungarian String Quartet 
Saturday, January 18th 

Borodin String Quartet (Moscow) 
Saturday, February 8th 

Igor Kipnis (Harpsichord) 
Saturday, March 22nd 

Fine Arts String Quartet 



S. U. MAJOR SPEAKERS SERIES 
The Major Speakers Committee of the Duke Uni- 
versity Student Union is responsible for bringing to 
the campus figures of national and international sig- 
nificance. These distinguished individuals speak on 



(5) 



the complex problems of our time from their wide 
range of knowledge and experience. When contro- 
versial matters are involved, the Committee makes 
every effort to present authoritative speakers who rep- 
resent diverse opinions on the subject. 

In the difficult process of selecting and securing 
these speakers, great assistance is provided by the 
faculty, administration, trustees, alumni, and friends. 
Through the joint efforts of these groups, the student 
Committee has for a number of years preseuted an 
extraordinary roster of major figures. The speakers 
confirmed for the fall semester include: 

Tues., Sept. 24, 1968 — 8:15 p.m. — Page Auditorium 

The Honorable George McGhee, United States Ambassador 
at Large (former ambassador to West Germany) 

Thur., Sept. 26, 1968—8:15 p.m. — Page Auditorium 

The Honorable Mark Hatfield, United States Senator from 
Oregon 

Tues. and Wed., Oct. 15 & 16, 1968—8:15 p.m.— Page Audi- 
torium 
Dr. Michael Harrington, Author ("The Other America") 
and political scientist 

Mon., Nov. 18, 1968—8:15 p.m. — Page Auditorium 

Dr. Clark Kerr, Chairman, Commission on the Future of 
Higher Education (former President, University of Cali- 
fornia at Berkeley) 

Sun., Nov. 24, 1968 — 8:15 p.m. — Baldwin Auditorium 
Mrs. Jeane Dixon, President, Children-to-Children, Inc. 



S. U. PERFORMING ARTS PROGRAMS 
The Performing Arts Committee of the Duke Uni- 
versity Student Union announces four major artistic 
events for the fall semester. A presentation of Ben- 
jamin Britten's dramatic opera "Curlew River" will 
be presented in the University Chapel on Friday, 
October 25th at 8 :15 p.m. Presented in much the 
same manner as last year's SRO performance of 
"The Play of Daniel," this work is based on the 
ancient Japanese No-play, " Sumidagawa. " It has 
been transplanted by Britten and his collaborator, 
William Plomer, to Curlew River and a church in 
the Fens. The story itself is a moving tale of a dis- 
traught mother in search of her lost child. The En- 
glish libretto unfolds like a morality play and is 
all the more compelling for the stark economy of its 
movement and action. The music is supplied by mem- 
bers of The Little Orchestra Society of New York 
under the direction of Thomas Scherman. The com- 
plement of musicians includes five vocal soloists, 
drawn from the leading American opera companies, 
plus a male chorus. Reserved seat tickets, priced at 
$3.00, $2.50, and $2.00, will be available October 1st 
at the Page Box Office. 

On Saturday evening, November 9th, "An Eve- 
ning of Jazz" will be held in the Indoor Stadium 
featuring the remarkable Billy Taylor Trio. Tickets, 
priced at $2.50 and $2.00, will be available October 
1st. 

On Wednesday, December 18th, a performance of 
"Nutcracker" by the North Carolina School of the 
Arts Ballet will be presented. The North Carolina 
Symphony Orchestra adult concert will be given in 
Page Auditorium at 8 :15 p.m. on Wednesdav, Janu- 
ary 29th. 



S. U. FALL FILM SERIES (16 mm) 
The Cinematic Arts Committee of the Duke Uni- 
versity Student Union announces the Fall Film Series. 
Season tickets, priced at $5.50, are now available in 
the Page Box Office for showings of these nine 16mm 
films. This series will be held in the auditorium of 
the Biological Sciences Building at 8 :00 p.m. and 
special discussion periods will follow each of the 
presentations. A listing follows: 

Fri., Dec. 13, 1968 

"Diary of a Country Priest" — Bresson 

' ' Mass for Dakota Sioux ' ' — Baillie 
Fri., Jan. 10, 1969 

"Goldstein" 

' ' Double Whoopee ' ' — Laurel and Hardy 
Fri., Sept. 27, 1968 

' ' International House ' ' — W. C. Fields 

' ' Desistfilm ' ' — Brakhage 
Fri., Oct. 4, 1968 

"The Blue Angel" — von Sternberg 

' ' Phyllis and Terry ' ' 
Fri., Oct. 18, 1968 

"World of Apu"— Bay 

' ' Flying Man ' ' 
Fri., Nov. 1, 1968 

"Touch of Evil"— Welles 

' ' Schmeerguntz ' ' — Nelson 
Fri., Nov. 8, 1968 

' ' The Coconuts ' ' — Marx Brothers 

' ' The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari ' '— Wiene 
Fri., Nov. 15, 1968 

"Jules and Jim" — Truffaut 
Fri., Dec. 6, 1968 

' • Mother ' ' — Pudovkin 

' ' Belativity ' ' — Emsh wilier 



LIBRARY ORIENTATION FOR NEW 
GRADUATE STUDENTS 
A one-hour slide presentation on the services, re- 
sources and arrangement of the William R. Perkins 
Library will be offered for new graduate students and 
faculty by the Reference Department of the library. 
This presentation will be of primary benefit to stu- 
dents in the humanities and social sciences, but others 
are welcome. The lectures will take place in Build- 
ing 9 (Sociology-Psychology), Room 126 at the fol- 
lowing times : 

Friday, September 13th at 1:30 p.m. 
Monday, September 16th at 1:00 and 2:00 p.m. 
Tuesday, September 17th at 2:00 p.m. 
Wednesday, September 18th at 6:30 p.m. 
Thursday, September 19th at 7:30 p.m. 

Please note that these lectures will not be held in 
the Library, but in Building 9 (Sociology-Psychol- 
ogy). 



SCHOOL OF VIOLIN 
Arlene Di Cecco and Dorothy Kitchen announce 
the continuation of their Violin School. Duke par- 
ents interested in enrolling their children in this im- 
portant musical development should contact Arlene 
Di Cecco (489-4675) or Dorothy Kitchen (286-3141) 
immediatelv. 



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LIBRARY SCHEDULES 
(beginning September 19, 1968) 

Perkins Library 
Monday-Friday 

Circulation Department 
Reference Department 
Undergraduate Reading Room 
Graduate Reading Room 
Periodicals 



00 a.m.-ll:00 p.m. 
00 a.m.-ll:00 p.m. 
00 a.m.-12:00 midnight 
00 a.m.-12:00 midnight 
00 a.m.-ll:00 p.m. 



Saturday 
Circulation Department 
Reference Department 
Undergraduate Reading Room 
Graduate Reading Room 
Periodicals 
Documents 

Sunday 

Circulation Department 
Reference Department 
Undergraduate Reading Room 
Graduate Reading Room 
Periodicals 



00 a.m.- 6:00 p.m. 
00 a.m.- 6:00 p.m. 
00 a.m.-10:30 p.m. 
00 a.m.-10:30 p.m. 
00 a.m.- 6:00 p.m. 
30 a.m.- 5:00 p.m. 



Woman 
Monday-Friday 
Saturday 
Sunday 

Schedules for other 
Libraries will be posted. 



2:00 p.m.-ll:00 p.m. 

2:00 p.m.-ll:00 p.m. 
12:30 p.m.-12:00 midnight 
12:30 p.m.-12:00 midnight 

1:00 p.m.-ll:00 p.m. 

s College Library 

00 a.m.-ll:00 p.m. 

00 a.m.- 5:00 p.m. 

00 p.m.-ll:00 p.m. 
School, College and Departmental 



MEDICAL CENTER LIBRARY 
SCHEDULE 

Monday-Friday 8:30 a.m.-12:00 midnight 

Saturday 8:30 a.m.-ll:00 p.m. 

Sunday 10:00 a.m.-ll:00 p.m. 



DUKE UNIVERSITY DINING HALLS 

Men's Dining Halls 

(Located in West Campus Union) 

September 1968 



Weekly ileal Hours 
Blue and White Room 

Breakfast 7:00- 9:30 

Snack Bar 9:00-11:00 

(Saturday Only) 
Lunch 11:30- 2:00 

Dinner 5:00- 7:00 



Sunday Meal Hours 
Blue and White Room 

Breakfast 8:30-11:00 

Lunch 11:30- 2:00 

Dinner 5:00- 7:00 



University Room 




University 


Room 




Lunch 11:00- 


1:30 


Lunch 




11:30- 


1:30 


Dinner 5:00- 


6:30 


Dinner 




5:00- 


6:30 


(Closed Saturday) 












Oak Room 




Oak Room 








Lunch 11:30- 


2:00 


Lunch 




11:30- 


2:00 


Dinner 5:00- 


7:00 


Dinner 




5:00- 


7:00 



(Closed on Saturdays 
EXCEPT for home foot- 
ball games) 



Cambridge Inn 
Snack Bar 

Evening 



9:00-11:00 
2:00- 5:00 
8:00-12:30 



Cambridge Inn 

Evening 8:00-12:30 



THE GOTHIC BOOKSHOP 
The Gothic Bookshop, by Page Auditorium, wel- 
comes you and invites you to browse in one of the 
best-stocked Bookshops in the South. 



DUKE UNIVERSITY 

1968 FOOTBALL SCHEDULE 

AND TICKET PRICES 

AT HOME 

PRICES 
Family Chil- 

Date Time Opponent Regular Plan dren 

Sept. 28— 2:00 p.m. Michigan $6.00 $4.00 $1.50 

Oct. 12—2:00 p.m. Virginia $6.00 $4.00 $1.50 

Nov. 2 — 2:00 p.m. Ga. Tech $6.00 $4.00 $1.50 

Nov. 9 — 2:00 p.m. N.C. State $6.00 $4.00 $1.50 

Nov. 16— 2:00 p.m. Wake Forest . ., . $6.00 $4.00 $1.50 

Season Tickets 
PREFERRED LOCATION: 

PUBLIC $27.50 

FACULTY $15.00 

FAMILY PLAN (Adult) $17.50 

FAMILY PLAN (Child) $ 7.50 

FAMILY PLAN (Faculty) $10.00 

AWAY 

Date Time Opponent Price 

Sept. 21—7:30 p.m. S. Carolina $6.00 

Oct. 5 — 2:15 p.m. Maryland (Norfolk) $6.00 

Oct. 19— 1 :30 p.m. Clemson $6.00 

Oct. 26 — 2 : 00 p.m. Army $6.00 

Nov. 23 — 1 :30 p.m. North Carolina $6.00 

Check or money order must accompany all orders. Add 50^ 
to cover cost of insured mail. Address all orders to Business 
Manager, Duke Athletic Association, Durham, North Carolina. 



DUKE UNIVERSITY CALENDAR 
The Duke University Calendar is published 
weekly throughout the year with the exception of 
the various recess periods. The format covers a 
Sunday through Sunday time period. The Cal- 
endar is distributed on campus and through the 
U.S. mail on Friday and Saturday of each week. 
Notices for publications in the Calendar should 
be in typewritten form, signed by the person sub- 
mitting information and should give his phone 
extension. Deadline for submission of copy to the 
Calendar Office, 207 Flowers Building, is Tuesday 
afternoon before 5:00 p.m. This deadline is abso- 
lutely necessary in order that the Calendar may 
be handled by the printers and ready for distribu- 
tion on Friday and Saturday. 

Mailed subscriptions of the Calendar for the 
academic year (September through May) are avail- 
able by sending a check for $2.50, payable to Duke 
University Calendar, to Box KM Duke Station. 
The Calendar Office is located at Room 207 Flowers 
Building, phone extension 2911. 



DUKE UNIVERSITY FALL SEMESTER 
CALENDAR 

The usual semester calendar published by the 
Student Union has not been printed because of 
budget limitations and rising costs. Efforts are 
now being made for a substitute publication which 
will cover a semester time period. Information re- 
garding this publication will be noted in this cal- 
endar as soon as possible. 



IMPORTANT— Notices for the Duke University Calendar should be submitted 

IN WRITTEN FORM to Room 207 Flowers Building, West Campus not later 

than 5:00 p.m., Tuesday. Extension 2911. 



Duke University 

^ALENDAR_ 



^ 
Ui 




Sept. 22-29, 1968 



Sunday, September 22 

10:20 a.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Chal- 
lenges in Education." WCHL Chapel Hill. 
Dr. Jack Blanton will discuss "The Gulf 
Stream Boundary." 

10:30-10:45 a.m. Carillon Recital. Mr. J. Samuel 
Hammond, University Carillonneur. 

11 :00 a.m. University Service of Workshop. Univer- 
sity Chapel. Preacher: The Reverend Profes- 
sor James T. Cleland, Dean of the Chapel. 
Sermon: "What's the Question?" Broadcast 
over WDNC and WDNC-FM. 
2:30-4:30 p.m. Delta Gamma Tea. 2749 McDowell 

Street. 
4:00-6:00 p.m. International Open House. 2022 

Campus Drive. 
7 :00 and 9 :00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page 
Auditorium. "ZORBA THE GREEK" with 
Anthony Quinn, Alan Bates, and Irene Papas. 
Anthony Quinn 's Zorba in this tempestuous 
picture possesses all the energies and urges of 
the great ones of history and myth. He is 
Adam in the Garden of Eden, Odysseus on the 
windy plains of Troy. He is a bit of Nijinsky 
and a good bit of Tom Jones ! — Crowther, N.Y. 
Times. "The director, Michael Cacoyannis, is 
a film genius who has realized all the grandeur 
of the novel." — Cook, World Telegram. 
8:30 p.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Chal- 
lenges in Education." WPTP Raleigh. Dr. 
John Costlow will discuss "A Marine Lab for 
All." 



Monday, September 23 

10:00 a.m. The final examination of Mrs. Elizabeth 
Lovell McMahan for the Ed.D. degree in Edu- 
cation. Room 08D West Duke Building. 

4:15 p.m. Zoology Seminar. Room 130 Biological 
Sciences Building. Speaker: Dr. B. R. Brink- 
ley. 

5:15 p.m. Faculty Volleyball. Card Gymnasium. 

6:00-8:00 p.m. Student Activities Night. Indoor 
Stadium. 



7 :30 p.m. Durham Civic Choral Society meeting. 
Durham High School. 

8 :00 p.m. Pre-Symposium Program : American Ra- 
dio and Television Commercials Festival. Page 
Auditorium. 



Tuesday, September 24 

10 :00 a.m. Divinity School Chapel. University Chap- 
el. Speaker: Dr. W. A. Kale. Reader: Mr. 
Fred Jordan. 

4:00 p.m. Forest Ecology Seminar. Room 130 Bi- 
ological Sciences Building. Speaker: Mr. Rob- 
ert N. Mowbray. 

8:15 p.m. Student Union Major Speakers Series: 
The Honorable George C. McGhee, United 
States Ambassador at Large. Page Auditori- 
um. 



Wednesday, September 25 

10 :00 a.m. Divinity School Chapel. University Chap- 
el. Speaker: Dr. W. A. Kale. Reader: Mrs. 
Jade Dell. 

11 :00 a.m. Student Union Major Speakers Seminar : 
The Honorable George C. McGhee, United 
States Ambassador at Large. Room 201 Flow- 
ers Building. 
7 :00-8 :30 p.m. Chapel Choir Rehearsal. Univer- 
sity Chapel. 
7:30 p.m. Duke Blue Devil's Club Program. Page 
Auditorium. 



Thursday, September 26 

10 :00 a.m. Divinity School Chapel. University Chap- 
el. Speaker: Mr. Pete Wohlwend. 

3 :30 p.m. The final examination of Mr. Hiram Hor- 
ace Hilty for the Ph.D. degree in History. 
Room 231 Allen Building. 

5:15 p.m. Faculty Volleyball. Card Gymnasium. 

8:15-9:30 p.m. West Campus Swimming Pool open 
to faculty members and their families. Facul- 
ty children will be admitted only when accom- 
panied by their parents. 



8:15 p.m. Student Union Major Speakers Series: 
The Honorable Mark 0. Hatfield, United States 
Senator from Oregon. Page Auditorium. 



Friday, September 27 

10 :00 a.m. Divinity School Chapel. University Chap- 
el. Speaker: Dr. W. A. Kale. Reader: Mr. 
Sterling Green. 

2 :00 p.m. The final examination of Mr. Victor Alan 
Harris for the Ph.D. degree in Psychology. 
Room 222 Psychology-Sociology Building. 

3:30 p.m. Chemistry Staff Seminar. Room 130 
Psychology-Sociology Building. Speaker: Pro- 
fessor Phillip J. Hamrick, Jr. 

8:00 p.m. Student Union Cinematic Arts Commit- 
tee Film Series: "International House" and 
"Desistfilm. " Biological Sciences Auditori- 
um. "International House" starring W. C. 
Fields, Rudy Vallee, Stuart Erwin, Peggy 
Hopkins, and directed by A. Edward Suther- 
land is a zany comedy about a radio device 
invented by a resident of the International 
House in China. Amorous complications en- 
sue when a jealous Russian, one of a multi- 
nation delegation appraising the invention, 
loses his ex-wife to a wacky aviator. (72 min- 
utes, Black & White, 1933). 



Saturday, September 28 

9:55 a.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Chal- 
lenges in Education." WDNC Durham. Dr. 
Jack Blanton will discuss "The Gulf Stream 
Boundary." 

2:00 p.m. Varsity Football: Duke vs. The Univer- 
sity of Michigan. Wallace Wade Stadium. 

7 :00 and 9 :00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page 
Auditorium. "A MAN FOR ALL SEA- 
SONS" from the play by Robert Bolt with 
Wendy Hiller, Orson Welles, Susannah York, 
and Paul Scofield as Thomas More. 8 Acad- 
emy Award Nominations including Best Pic- 
ture of the Year! "As close as one gets to 
perfection! Sir Thomas More's fight for free- 
dom of conscience in 16th Century England." 
— Cue. 

8:00 p.m. Student Union Major Attraction: ''The 
Turtles" and "The New York Rock and Roll 
Ensemble." Indoor Stadium. 



Sunday, September 29 

10:20 a.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Chal- 
lenges in Education." WCHL Chapel Hill. 
Dr. Henry Weitz will discuss "Counseling on 
the Campus." 

10:30-10:45 a.m. Carillon Recital. Mr. J. Samuel 
Hammond, University Carillonneur. 

11 :00 a.m. University Service of Worship. Univer- 
sity Chapel. Preacher : The Reverend Dr. Wal- 



do Beach. Broadcast over WDNC and WDNC- 
FM. 

4:00-6:00 p.m. International Open House. 2022 
Campus Drive. 

7 :00 and 9 :00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page 
Auditorium. "A MAN FOR ALL SEA- 
SONS" from the play by Robert Bolt with 
Wendy Hiller, Orson Welles, Susannah York, 
and Paul Scofield as Thomas More. 8 Acad- 
emy Award Nominations including Best Pic- 
ture of the Year! "As close as one gets to 
perfection! Sir Thomas More's fight for free- 
dom of conscience in 16th Century England. ' ' 
—Cue. 

8:30 p.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Chal- 
lenges in Education." WPTF Raleigh. Mr. 
Burton King will discuss ' ' Noise : A Growing 
Menace. ' ' 



UNIVERSITY SERVICE OF WORSHIP 
The Reverend James T. Cleland, Dean of the 
Chapel, will deliver the sermon at the University 
Service of Worship on Sunday, September 22nd at 
11 :00 a.m. in the University Chapel. The order of 
worship follows: 

The Reverend McMurry S. Richey, Chairman, 
Duke University Religious Council, Presiding Minis- 
ter. 

Dr. M. Margaret Ball, Dean of the Woman's Col- 
lege, Lector. 

Opening Organ Voluntary — ' ' Kyrie, Gott heiliger Geist ' ' Bach 
Choral Call to Worship — 

"The Lord is in His Holy Temple" Harrington 

Hymn of Praise — ' ' From All That Dwell Below ' ' John Hatton 
Prayer of Confession and for Pardon 
Words of Assurance 

Anthem — ' ' O Heart Subdued With Grieving ' ' J. Brahms 

Scripture Lesson — 

Micah 6:6-8; Luke 10:25-29; Matthew 16:13-15 
The Gloria Patri 
Greeting and Call to Prayer 
Pastoral Prayers of Thanksgiving, Intercession, and 

Supplication 
The Lord's Prayer 
Sermon — "What's the Question?" 
Prayer 

Hynm — "The Lord Be With Us" William Gardiner 

The Offering 

Offertory Organ Interlude 

Anthem — "How Excellent Thy Name, O Lord" Handel 

Response — The Doxology 
Prayer of Dedication 
Benediction 

Choral Response — ' ' Sevenfold Amen Stainer 

The Chimes 
Closing Organ Voluntary — 

"Wir glauben all' an einen Gott" Bach 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE Ed.D. DEGREE 
The final examination of Mrs. Elizabeth Lovell 
McMahan for the Ed.D. degree in Education will be 
held on Monday, September 23rd at 10:00 a.m. in 
Room 08D West Duke Building. The subject of Mrs. 
McMahan 's dissertation is "A Study Of The Depart- 
ment Of Public Health Education, School of Public 
Health, University Of North Carolina." 



(2) 



The committee to conduct the examination con- 
sists of Professors W. H. Cartwright, Allan S. Hurl- 
burt, Charles Johnson, Olan Petty and I. B. Holley, 
Jr. Professor Cartwright will preside. 



DELTA GAMMA TEA 
The Carolina Piedmont Alumnae Association of 
Delta Gamma will hold its Fall tea on Sunday, Sep- 
tember 22nd from 2 :30-4 :30 p.m. at the home of Mrs. 
Hugh G. Robinson, 2749 McDowell Street. All Delta 
Gamma alumnae are invited to attend. 



DEPARTMENT OP ZOOLOGY SEMINAR 
The Department of Zoology will hold their week- 
ly seminar on Monday, September 23rd at 4:15 p.m. 
in Room 130 of the Biological Sciences Building. Dr. 
B. R. Brinkley of the University of Texas, Section 
of Cell Biology, M. D. Anderson Hospital and Tumor 
Institute, Houston, Texas, will speak on "Ultrastruc- 
tural Basis of Kinetoehore-Centriole Interaction in 
Mitosis and Meiosis. " Dr. Brinkley contributes di- 
rectly to the understanding of structure-function in- 
teraction by his ultrastruetural studies of experi- 
mentally altered cells. Coffee and tea will be served 
in the foyer at 4 :00 p.m. 



STUDENT ACTIVITIES NIGHT 
Student Activities Night, the annual event spon- 
sored by the Associated Students of Duke University, 
will take place this year on September 23rd from 
6 :00-8 :00 p.m. It is the opportunity for freshmen to 
learn about all the extra-curricular opportunities at 
Duke and involve themselves directly in the affairs 
of the University community. Sixty organizations 
will have booths this year in the Indoor Stadium, 
with varied audio-visual aids adding to the effects of 
their presentations. The new arrivals at Duke may 
circulate from table to table, talking to the heads of 
the clubs and signing up for membership if they are 
interested. 



PRE-SYMPOSIUM PROGRAM : 
AMERICAN COMMERCIALS 

The 1968-69 Duke Symposium will be concerned 
with a study of leading forms of mass media. The 
first pre-Symposium program will be held on Mon- 
day, September 23rd, at 8 :00 p.m. in Page Auditori- 
um. "Wallace A. Ross, President of the American 
Radio and Television Commercials Festival, will nar- 
rate a collection of commercials from the 1967-68 
season. 

All sessions relating to the Symposium are open 
to the public without charge. 



DURHAM CIVIC CHORAL SOCIETY 
The Durham Civic Choral Society will begin its 
fall season of rehearsal on Monday, September 23rd, 



at 7 :30 p.m. in the Choral music room of the Durham 
High School. Any members of the Duke University 
community interested in choral singing are invited 
to come. No auditions are necessary. The Society 
will rehearse every Monday night, under the direc- 
tion of Professor Allan Bone, in preparation for its 
annual Christmas concert, set this year for December 
13th. The program anticipated will include the Bach 
Cantata 140 ("Sleepers, Wake") and other works 
suitable to the season. 



FOREST ECOLOGY SEMINAR 

On Tuesday, September 24th, Mr. Robert N. Mow- 
bray, a graduate student, will present a talk on 
"SHAG: A Problem in Tropical Ecology." The 
seminar will be held at 4 :00 p.m. in Room 130 of the 
Biological Sciences Building. 



STUDENT UNION MAJOR SPEAKER SERIES 
AMBASSADOR GEORGE C. McGHEE 

The Student Union's 1968-69 Major Speakers 
Series will be initiated by the Honorable George C. 
McGhee, United States Ambassador at Large, at 8 -.15 
p.m. on Tuesday, September 24th in Page Auditori- 
um. Ambassador McGhee will speak on "The Soviet 
Threat in "Western Europe." A question and answer 
period will follow his address which is open to the 
public without charge. 

A native of "Waco. Texas, Mr. McGhee attended 
Southern Methodist University and the University 
of Oklahoma where he received his B.S. degree in 
1933. As a Rhodes Scholar at Oxford University, he 
received the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in 1937. 
He subsequently attended the University of London 
and has been awarded honorary degrees by Southern 
Methodist University, Tulane, and the University of 
Maryland. Before becoming associated with the gov- 
ernment, Mr. McGhee was a geologist and petroleum 
producer. 

In 1941 Mr. McGhee entered Government service 
with the War Production Board and in the following 
year with the Combined Raw Materials Board. In 
"World "War II he served as a lieutenant in the United 
States Navy and was awarded the Legion of Merit 
and three battle stars for duty in the Pacific. 

His association with the State Department began 
in 1946 when he was appointed special assistant to 
the Under Secretary for Economic Affairs. He be- 
came coordinator for aid to Greece and Turkey the 
following year. He has subsequently held posts as 
Assistant Secretary of State for Near Eastern, South 
Asian, and African Affairs in 1949 and 1951 as Am- 
bassador and Chief of the American Aid Mission to 
Turkey. 

In 1961 he served as Counselor of the Department 
of State and Chairman of the Policy Planning Coun- 
cil. He was later appointed Under Secretary of State 
for Political Affairs and in 1963 he took the oath as 
United States Ambassador to Bonn. 

In addition to his other activities, Mr. McGhee is 
a member of the Board of Trustees of Duke Univer- 



(3) 



sity and has served as director of a number of orga- 
nizations, among which are: the Brookings Institu- 
tion, the Committee for Economic Development, and 
Aspen Institute. 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. Hiram Horace Hilty 
for the Ph.D. degree in History will be held on 
Thursday, September 26th at 3:30 p.m. in Room 231 
Allen Building. The subject of Mr. Hilty 's disserta- 
tion is "North Carolina Quakers And Slavery." 

The committee to conduct the examination con- 
sists of Professors Robert H. Woody, Robert F. Dur- 
den, Theodore Ropp and R. L. Predmore. Professor 
Woody will preside. 



DUKE UNIVERSITY 

PERKINS LIBRARY SCHEDULE 

1968/69 

CIRCULATION DEPARTMENT 

Monday-Friday 8:00 A.M.-11:00 P.M. 

Saturday 8:00 A.M.- 6:00 P.M. 

Sunday 2:00 P.M.-11:00 P.M. 

REFERENCE DEPARTMENT 
Monday-Friday 
Saturday 
Sunday 



UNDERGRADUATE READING ROOM 



Monday-Friday 

Saturday 

Sunday 

GRADUATE READING ROOM 
Monday-Friday 
Saturday 
Sunday 

DOCUMENTS DEPARTMENT 

Mon.-Fri. 8:30 A.M.-5:00 P.M. 

Saturday 

Sunday 

MANUSCRIPT DEPARTMENT 
Monday-Friday 
Saturday 
Sunday 



8 



12 



!:00 A.M.-11:00 P.M. 
!:00 A.M.- 6:00 P.M. 
2:00 P.M.-11:00 P.M. 

00 A.M.-12 Midnight 
00 A.M.-10:30 P.M. 
30 P.M.-12 Midnight 

00 A.M.-12 Midnight 
00 A.M.-10:30 P.M. 
30 P.M.-12 Midnight 



7:00 P.M.-10:00 P.M. 
8:30 A.M.- 5:00 P.M. 
Closed 



8:00 A.M. 
8:00 A.M. 
Closed 



5:30 P.M. 
12:30 P.M. 



NEWSPAPER AND FILM DEPARTMENT 

Mon.-Fri. 8:30 A.M.-5:00 P.M. 6:30 P.M.-10:00 P.M. 

Saturday 8:30 A.M.- 5:00 P.M. 

Sunday 2:00 P.M.- 5:00 P.M. 
RARE BOOK ROOM 

Monday -Friday 9:00 A.M.- 5:00 P.M. 

Saturday 9:00 A.M.- 1:00 P.M. 

Sunday 

XEROX COPYING SERVICE (Ext. 
Monday-Friday 
Saturday 
Sunday 



9:00 A.M.- 
9:00 A.M.- 
Closed 

5075) 
8:30 A.M.- 
8:30 A.M.- 
Closed 



5:00 P.M. 
1:00 P.M. 



CHEMISTRY STAFF SEMINAR 
Professor Phillip J. Hamrick, Jr., Department of 
Chemistry, Wake Forest University, will speak at 
the Chemistry Staff Seminar on Friday, September 
27th, at 3 :30 p.m. in Room 130 Psychology-Sociology 
Building. The subject of Professor Hamrick 's ad- 



dress will be "Exchange Reactions of Free Radicals 
X-Irridiated Organic Solids." All interested per- 



iii 



sons are cordially invited to attend. 



DUKE UNIVERSITY 

DEPARTMENTAL LIBRARY SCHEDULES 

1968/69 



BIOLOGY-FORESTRY 

Mon.-Fri. 9:00 AM.-5:00 P.M. 

Saturday 

Sunday 2:00 P.M.-5:00 P.M. 

CHEMISTRY 

Mon.-Fri. 9:00 A.M.-5:00 P.M. 

Saturday 

Sunday 2:00 P.M.-5:00 P.M. 

DIVINITY SCHOOL 

Monday-Friday 

Saturday 

Sunday 

ENGINEERING 
Monday-Friday 
Saturday 
Sunday 

LAW 

Mouday-Friday 

Saturday 

Sunday 

MATH-PHYSICS 

Mon.-Fri. 9:00 A.M.-5:00 P.M. 7:00 P.M. 

Saturday 9:00 A.M. 

Sunday Closed 

WOMAN'S COLLEGE LIBRARY 

Monday-Friday 

Saturday 

Sunday 

PSYCHOLOGY READING ROOM 
Monday-Thursday 
Friday 

Saturday 
Sunday 



7:00 P.M.-11:00 P.M. 
9:00 A.M.-12:30 P.M. 
7:00 P.M.-11:00 P.M. 

7:00 P.M.-11:00 P.M. 
9:00 A.M.- 5:00 P.M. 
7:00 P.M.-11:00 P.M. 



00 A.M.-11:00 P.M. 
00 A.M.- 5:00 P.M. 
00 P.M.- 6:00 P.M. 



8:30 A.M.-12 Midnight 
8:30 A.M.-12 Noon 
2:00 P.M.-12 Midnight 



7:45 A.M. 
7:45 A.M. 
2:00 P.M. 



8:00 AM. 
8:00 A.M. 
2:00 P.M. 

(ext. 4395) 
30 A.M. 
30 A.M. 

2:00 P.M. 

2:00 P.M. 



11:45 P.M. 
11:00 P.M. 
11:00 P.M. 

11:00 P.M. 
12 Noon 



11:00 P.M. 

5:00 P.M. 

11:00 P.M. 

11:00 P.M. 

5:00 P.M. 

5:00 P.M. 
11:00 P.M. 



STUDENT UNION MAJOR SPEAKERS SERIES 
SENATOR MARK O. HATFIELD 

The Major Speakers Committee of the Duke Uni- 
versity Student Union will present Senator Mark O. 
Hatfield, Republican from Oregon, in a major address 
entitled "Politics and Priorities" on Thursday, Sep- 
tember 26th at 8 :15 p.m. in Page Auditorium. Sena- 
tor Hatfield will also participate in an informal sem- 
inar at 3 :00 p.m. in the Courtroom of the Law School. 
Both sessions are open to the public without charge. 

Senator Hatfield holds the B.A. degree from Wil- 
lamette University (1943) and the M.A. from Stan- 
ford University (1948), and is the recipient of nu- 
merous honorary degrees. He was associated with 
Willamette LTniversitv as an associate professor in 
Political Science from 1949 to 1956 and Dean of Stu- 
dents from 1950 to 1956. Active in politics for a 
number of years, he served in both houses of the 
state legislature and as Oregon's Secretary of State 
from 1957 to 1959. In 1959 he was elected Governor 
of Oregon and served in that capacity for eight years 
before being elected to the United States Senate in 
1966. A liberal Republican, he is one of the most 
active critics of Administration policy in Vietnam 



(4) 



and co-sponsor of a resolution presently before the 
Senate calling for legislative review of the war. 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. Victor Alan Harris 
for the Ph.D. degree in Psychology will be held on 
Friday, September 27th at 2:00 p.m. in Room 222 
Psychology/Sociology Bldg. The subject of Mr. Har- 
ris' dissertation is "The Effects Of Power Variations 
On Public Agreement And Private Attitude Change. ' ' 

The committee to conduct the examination con- 
sists of Professors Edward E. Jones, Norman Gutt- 
man, Darwyn Linder, Charles Greenbaum and Wil- 
liam E. Wilkinson. Professor Jones will preside. 



STUDENT UNION MAJOR ATTRACTION 
"THE TURTLES" and "THE NEW YORK ROCK 
AND ROLL ENSEMBLE" 

The Student Union Major Attractions Committee 
will present The Turtles and The New York Rock and 
Roll Ensemble in concert on Saturday, September 
28th, at 8 :00 p.m. in the Indoor Stadium. 

The Turtles, with "Happy Together," "Let Me 
Be," "She'd Rather Be With Me," "You Know 
What I Mean," and "My Girl," have unleashed a 
string of hits few modern groups can equal. They 
threaten to add to that amazing record with their 
new smash sweeping in from the north called "Elea- 
nor." The New York Rock and Roll Ensemble, fresh 
from an engagment in Manhattan's famous Bitter 
End, provide a new genre to rock and classical-rock 
with a most entertaining result. 

Tickets, priced at $3.00 for reserved seats and 
$2.50 for general admission, are available Monday- 
Saturday on Duke's Main Quad and by mail from 
Box KM Duke Station. Checks should be made pay- 
able to the Duke University Student Union. 



CREATIVE ART FOR CHILDREN AND ADULTS 
Classes in Creative Art for children and adults 
will be taught by Zeren Earls at the Methodist Stu- 
dent Center on Oregon Street beginning September 
30th. Members of the Duke community who wish to 
enroll their children should contact her (688-3629) 
immediately. 



ART LOAN COLLECTION 
The Duke University Art Loan Collection is avail- 
able for rental in the Art Building (former Psychol- 
ogy Building) Room 201, Monday through Friday 
from 9 :00 a.m.-5 :00 p.m. The collection contains re- 
productions of mainly Twentieth Century Art and 
also some originals. Rental fee is $3.00 per semester, 
to be paid in advance. 



STUDENT UNION ART EXHIBITION 

JAPANESE WOODBLOCK COLOR PRINTS 

An exhibition of 77 Japanese Woodblock Color 
Prints from the collection of Mr. and Mrs. Albert J. 
Kirkpatrick of New York City will open in the West 
Union Lounge on Sunday, September 15th. The Stu- 
dent Union Graphic Arts Committee invites the pub- 
lic to this initial showing. Many of the prints will 
be offered for sale during the time the exhibit will 
be on display (September 15-October 15 from 8:00 
a.m.-10:00 p.m.) 

The Kirkpatrick 's have been collecting Japanese 
prints for more than 30 years in many parts of the 
United States as well as in Europe and the Orient. 
A large part of their collection of some 1500 prints 
comes from Japan and from the ateliers of the artists. 

The Boston Museum of Fine Arts, the Brooklyn 
Museum, the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Art in 
Philadelphia as well as galleries in New York City 
and in Washington, D. C. have acquired outstanding 
prints from this collection. The owners have given 
exhibitions at a number of colleges in Georgia and 
Florida, in the Garden Center at Rich's in Atlanta, 
and at the Columbus Museum of Arts and Crafts. 

The selection to be shown at Duke University rep- 
resents a cross-section of the whole collection and con- 
fines itself to Hanga prints, those of the first half 
of the 20th Century. Landscapes, Kunadori (actor 
make-up), Actor Portraits, Bijin (female beauties 
and Kua Cho (similar to our still life) will be in- 
cluded, these being the styles in which the Japanese 
artist traditionally expresses himself. There are, 
however, some examples of the abstract design so 
favored by the contemporary artist, on display. 

The 26 artists represented will feature the works 
of the Yoshida family, Hasui, Shinsui, Shunsen, Tad- 
amasa, Shiro and Tomikickiro among others whose 
names may be less familiar to Western art lovers. 

On October 3rd Mr. and Mrs. Kirkpatrick will give 
an informal gallery talk on the collection, bringing 
for this purpose a special selection of Ukiyo-e prints 
of the 19th Century, showing works by Hokusai, Hiro- 
shige i, Utamaro, Kunisada and Toyokini. They will 
also present some over-size prints and variations of 
the standard Oban size. 



DUKE CHAPEL PREACHING SCHEDULE, 
FALL SEMESTER, 1968-69 

September 

15 — Freshman Sunday — Rev. Dr. Howard C. Wilkinson, 

Chaplain to the University 
22 — Opening Sunday — Rev. Prof. James T. Cleland, Dean of 

the Chapel 
29 — Rev. Dr. Waldo Beach, Professor of Christian Ethics 

October 

6 — World Communion — Dean Cleland; Chaplain Wilkinson, 
Celebrant 
13 — Homecoming — Bishop Earl G. Hunt, Jr., Presiding 

Bishop, Charlotte Area, United Methodist Church 
20 — Rev. Prof. Robert E. Cushman, Dean of the Divinity 

School 
27 — Rev. Prof. Thomas A. Langford, Head of the Depart- 
ment of Religion 



(5) 



November 

3 — Bishop Roy D. Nichols, Member, Central Committee, 
World Council of Churces, and Presiding Bishop, Pitts- 
burg Area, United Methodist Church 

10 — Dad's Day — Rev. Dr. David H. C. Read, Minister, Madi- 
son Ave., Presbyterian Church, New York 

17 — Chaplain Wilkinson 

24 — Thanksgiving — Rev. Dr. McMurry S. Richey, Chairman, 
Duke University Religious Council, and Professor of 
Theology and Christian Nurtur 

December 

1 — Rev. Dr. Frederick Herzog, Professor of Systematic 

Theology 
8 — Founders Day — Dean Cleland 
15 — Christmas Sunday — Bishop William R. Cannon, Presid- 
ing Bishop, Raleigh Area, United Methodist Church 
22 — Rev. Dr. Creighton Lacy, Professor of World Christi- 
anity 
29 — Rev. Dr. Frank Baker, Professor of English Church 
History 

January 

5 — Rev. Dr. D. Moody Smith, Jr., Associate Professor of 

New Testament 
12— Rev. Dr. W. Arthur Kale, Professor of Christian Edu- 
cation 
19 — Rev. Elmer O. Hall, Assistant Chaplain to the University 
26 — Dean Cleland 



"BROADWAY AT DUKE" 

Student Union Drama Committee Presentations 

The Drama Committee of the Duke University 
Student Union announces its first Drama Series of 
traveling Broadway hits. These presentations by 
national touring companies are part of the Student 
Union's effort to bring the finest professional enter- 
tainment to the University and the entire community. 

Season tickets, which are priced at $11.00, $9.25, 
and $8.00 and are mailed to subscribers, are available 
at considerable savings and entitle holders to three 
exciting evenings of theater: a comedy — an evening 
of one-act plays by Pinter, Breeht, and Tabori — a 
musical. In addition to the price savings, season sub- 
scriptions eliminate the need for standing in ticket 
lines before each production. Season tickets orders 
are now being processed and will be mailed by October 
15th. Single tickets for plays will be available be- 
ginning Wednesday, November 1st. 

All performances will be presented in Page Au- 
ditorium at 8:15 p.m. Opening on Friday, November 
22nd, will be the national touring company's presen- 
tation of "You Know I Can't Hear You When the 
Water's Running," a raucous comedy starring Imo- 
gene Coca and King Donovan. A recent issue of Cue 
magazine noted that the ' ' Robert Anderson quartet of 
bawdy, compassionate, yet searching plays about man 
at sex-play constitutes the funniest show in town." 

The second attraction in the new series will be 
noted actress Viveea Lindfors leading a company of 
four, known as The Strolling Players, in three con- 
temporary one-act plays of particular relevance to 
current times. The lovely Swedish star, who played 
the title role in "Anastasia" on Broadway, later 
starred in New York productions of "Pal Joey," 
"Miss Julie," and "King Lear," will be seen at 
Duke in "The Lovers" by Harold Pinter; "The Man 



and the Dog" by George Tabari; and "The Jewish 
Wife" by Bertholt Breeht. The performance is set 
for Wednesday, February 5th, 1969. 

The final production will be the presentation of 
the Broadway hit show "Man of La Mancha" on 
Friday, February 21st, 1969. The musical, with 
choreography by Jack Cole and score and lyrics by 
Mitch Leigh and Joe Darion, won every prize of the 
Broadway season last year, including those of the 
New York Drama Critics' Circle, Outer Circle, Varie- 
ty Poll and Saturday Review awards. "Man of La 
Mancha" also received five Tony awards. The un- 
embellished story by Dale Wasserman becomes a mu- 
sical masterpiece in the Albert Selden-Hal James pro- 
duction of the work which portrays author Cervantes 
and his tragic hero, Don Quixote, against a harsh 
background of peasant life in the late 16th century in 
Spain. The company which is one of the largest the- 
atrical troupes on tour today, includes such popular 
Broadway favorites as Louis Criscuolo, Seymour Pen- 
zner, Bonn Carroll, Richard Frock. Lynn Carroll, 
Marise Counsell, Edmond Varrato and Mark Ross. 



S. U. FALL FILM SERIES (16 mm) 
The Cinematic Arts Committee of the Duke Uni- 
versity Student Union announces the Fall Film Series. 
Season tickets, priced at $5.50, are now available in 
the Page Box Office for showings of these nine 16mm 
films. This series will be held in the auditorium of 
the Biological Sciences Building at 8:00 p.m. and 
special discussion periods will follow each of the 
presentations. A listing follows : 

Fri., Sept. 27, 1968 

"International House"— W. C. Fields 

' ' Desistfilm ' ' — Brakhage 
Fri., Oct. 4, 1968 

"The Blue Angel" — von Sternberg 

"Phyllis and Terry" 
Fri., Oct. 18, 1968 

"World of Apu" — Ray 

"Flying Man" 
Fri., Nov. 1, 1968 

"Touch of Evil" — Welles 

' ' Schmeerguntz ' ' — Nelson 
Fri., Nov. 8, 1968 

"The Coconuts" — Marx Brothers 

"The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari" — Wiene 
Fri., Nov. 15, 1968 

"Jules and Jim" — Truffaut 
Fri., Dec. 6, 1968 

' ' Mother ' ' — Pudovkin 

' ' Relativity ' ' — Emsh wilier 
Fri., Dec. 13, 1968 

"Diary of a Country Priest" — Bresson 

"Mass for Dakota Sioux" — Baillie 
Fri., Jan. 10, 1969 

"Goldstein" 

' ' Double Whoopee ' ' — Laurel and Hardy 



S. U. PERFORMING ARTS PROGRAMS 
The Performing Arts Committee of the Duke Uni- 
versity Student Union announces four major artistic 
events for the fall semester. A presentation of Ben- 
jamin Britten's dramatic opera "Curlew River" will 



(6) 



be presented in the University Chapel on Friday, 
October 25th at 8 :15 p.m. Presented in much the 
same manner as last year's SRO performance of 
"The Play of Daniel," this work is based on the 
ancient Japanese Noh-play, "Sumidagawa. " It has 
been transplanted by Britten and his collaborator, 
William Plomer, to Curlew River and a church in 
the Fens. The story itself is a moving tale of a dis- 
traught mother in search of her lost child. The En- 
glish libretto unfolds like a morality play and is 
all the more compelling for the stark economy of its 
movement and action. The music is supplied by mem- 
bers of The Little Orchestra Society of New York 
under the direction of Thomas Scherman. The com- 
plement of musicians includes five vocal soloists, 
drawn from the leading American opera companies, 
plus a male chorus. Reserved seat tickets, priced at 
$3.00, $2.50, and $2.00, will be available October 1st 
at the Page Box Office. 

On Saturday evening, November 9th. "An Eve- 
ning of Jazz" will be held in the Indoor Stadium 
featuring the remarkable Billy Taylor Trio. Tickets, 
priced at $2.50 and $2.00, will be available October 
1st. 

On Wednesday, December 18th, a performance of 
"Nutcracker" by the North Carolina School of the 
Arts Ballet will be presented. The North Carolina 
Symphony Orchestra adult concert will be given in 
Page Auditorium at 8 :15 p.m. on Wednesday, Janu- 
ary 29th. 



1968-69 DUKE ARTISTS SERIES 
Season tickets priced at $13.00, $11.00, and $9.00 
are available in Page Box Office. A check payable to 
Duke University Artists Series should accompany 
orders and should be mailed to Box KM Duke Station, 
Durham. North Carolina. Call 684-4059 for further 
information. All concerts will be held in Page Au- 
ditorium at 8 :15 p.m. 

An open seminar, sponsored by the Student 
Union's Performing Arts Committee, precedes each 
Artist Series Concert. These sessions, which are con- 
ducted by members of the Music Department, begin 
at 7 :00 p.m. and allow for a question-answer period. 
All meetings will be held in Room 208 Flowers Build- 
ing, located directly above the Page Auditorium lob- 
by, and are open to the public without charge. 
The 1968-69 Series is as follows: 

Wednesday, November 20, 1968 
The Chamber Symphony of Philadelphia, An- 
shel Brusilow, Conductor. The Chamber Sympho- 
ny of Philadelphia, made up of thirty-six players, 
was founded in 1966 by the brilliant Anshel Brusi- 
low, one of America's foremost young musicians. 
Brusilow resigned as concertmaster of the great Phil- 
adelphia Orchestra in order to devote himself to a 
tremendous task: the formation and leadership of 
America's only permanent chamber symphony. In 
its inaugural season the orchestra played to live 
audiences of more than one quarter of a million and 
continued its triumphs by a most successful tour 



throughout the U.S. in its second season. The or- 
chestra offers an almost unlimited repertoire playing 
master pieces of the baroque and romantic schools as 
well as introducing compositions by outstanding con- 
temporaries. 

"Probably no music ensemble has settled down 
so quickly and firmly on the American scene as the 
Chamber Symphony of Philadelphia." — N. Y. Times. 

Wednesday, February 26, 1969 
Goldovsky Grand Opera Theater presenting 
"Carmen". Bizet's "Carmen" in English performed 
by a company of seventy is another demonstration of 
opera as living theater by the new expanded Goldov- 
sky Opera Theater under the artistic direction of 
Boris Goldovsky. The company is now in its 22nd 
year of touring opera to millions of opera lovers 
across the nation. Often called "the perfect opera," 
"Carmen" is also good theater and the music under- 
lines the dramatic situations at every turn. 

"A rousing success, proving that opera in English, 
properly staged, is live and appealing theater!" — 
Newsweek Magazine. 

Wednesday, March 5, 1969 
Clifford Curzon, Pianist. Clifford Curzon, rec- 
ognized as one of Britain's finest pianists and one of 
the greatest pianists of the time, returns to the United 
States in January, 1969 after a two year absence. Ac- 
claimed on his last visit here for "greatness of a 
kind that is forgotten today" (New York Times), Clif- 
ford Curzon has been one of the most welcome of in- 
ternational concert commuters ever since his first con- 
cert here in 1939. After the intervention of the war, 
his "second debut" took place in 1947 with Mitro- 
poulos and the New York Philharmonic. Since then 
Curzon has visited North America regularly, playing 
with the major orchestras, in solo recital, and on na- 
tionwide radio programs such as the Telephone Hour. 
His many recordings have further established him as 
"one of the most remarkable pianists and musicians 
now before the public." 

During his forthcoming American tour, Curzon 
will be heard again as soloist with George Szell and the 
Cleveland Orchestra, both in Cleveland and New 
York, with the Boston Symphony Orchestra and 
at the Metropolitan Museum in New York. He will 
also be heard in recital at several important edu- 
cational centers. 

Wednesday, March 19. 1969 
The Harkness Ballet. "The Harkness Ballet" 
has earned top flight artistic recognition in its mete- 
oric rise to fame through a combination of leading 
choreographers, composers, and designers as well as 
a company dedicated to excellence. The company is 
headed by Brian Macdonald, director; Donald Sadd- 
ler, associate director; and Jonathan Sternberg, mu- 
sical director. 

The Harkness Ballet is an American company 
which cherishes the great traditions of classical bal- 
let and at the same time presses forward into new 
frontiers of the dance, sponsoring fresh approaches 



(7) 



to dance techniques, choreography, musical composi- 
tion, and design. 

Friday, April 11, 1969 
Shirley Verrett, Mezzo-Soprano. S. Hurok pre- 
sents the brilliant mezzo-soprano Shirley Verrett 
whose superb voice, artistry, and bearing puts her, 
not only in the forefront of American singers, but 
among the finest singers of our time. Her star shines 
brightly on the world's concert stages, at London's 
Royal Opera, Covent Garden, at Milan's La Scala, at 
the Bolshoi in Moscow, and our own Metropolitan 
Opera Company. 



CHAMBER ARTS SOCIETY 
8 :15 p.m., Music Room, East Duke Building. Sea- 
son tickets: $12:50. Single tickets: $2.50. Write Dr. 
Ernest Nelson, Box 6065, College Station. 

Saturday, October 19th 

Concentus Musicus Vienna 
Saturday, November 9th 

Brazilian String Quartet 
Saturday, December 7th 

Hungarian String Quartet 
Saturday, January 18th 

Borodin String Quartet (Moscow) 
Saturday, February 8th 

Igor Kipnis (Harpsichord) 
Saturday, March 22nd 

Fine Arts String Quartet 



THE GOTHIC BOOKSHOP 
The Gothic Bookshop, by Page Auditorium, wel- 
comes you and invites you to browse in one of the 
best-stocked Bookshops in the South. 



DUKE UNIVERSITY DINING HALLS 

Men's Dining Halls 

(Located in "West Campus Union) 

September 1968 



Weekly ileal Sours 
Blue and White Boom 

Breakfast 7:00- 9:30 

Snack Bar 9:00-11:00 

(Saturday Only) 
Lunch 11:30- 2:00 

Dinner 5:00- 7:00 

University Boom 

Lunch 11:00- 1:30 

Dinner 5:00- 6:30 

(Closed Saturday) 



Sunday Meal Hours 
Blue and "White Boom 

Breakfast 8:30-11:00 

Lunch 11:30- 2:00 

Dinner 5:00- 7:00 



University Boom 

Lunch 11:30- 1:30 

Dinner 5:00- 6:30 



Oak Boom 


Oak Boom 




Lunch 11:30- 2:00 


Lunch 


11:30- 2:00 


Dinner 5:00- 7:00 


Dinner 


5:00- 7:00 


(Closed on Saturdays 






EXCEPT for home foot- 






ball games) 






Cambridge Inn 


Cambridge Inn 




Snack Bar 9:00-11:00 


Evening 


8:00-12:30 



2:00- 5:00 
Evening 8:00-12:30 



DUKE UNIVERSITY 

1968 FOOTBALL SCHEDULE 

AND TICKET PRICES 

AT HOME 

PRICES 
Family Chil- 

Date Time Opponent Regular Plan dren 

Sept. 28 — 2:00 p.m. Michigan $6.00 $4.00 $1.50 

Oct. 12 — 2:00 p.m. Virginia $6.00 $4.00 $1.50 

Nov. 2— 2:00 p.m. Ga. Tech $6.00 $4.00 $1.50 

Nov. 9— 2:00 p.m. N.C. State $6.00 $4.00 $1.50 

Nov. 16 — 2:00 p.m. Wake Forest ... $6.00 $4.00 $1.50 

Season Tickets 

PBEFEBBED LOCATION: 

PUBLIC $27.50 

FACULTY $15.00 

FAMILY PLAN (Adult) $17.50 

FAMILY PLAN (Child) $ 7.50 

FAMILY PLAN (Faculty) $10.00 

AWAY 

Date Time Opponent Price 

Sept. 21 — 7 :30 p.m. S. Carolina $6.00 

Oct. 5 — 2:15 p.m. Maryland (Norfolk) $6.00 

Oct. 19 — 1 -.30 p.m. Clemson $6.00 

Oct. 26—2:00 p.m. Army $6.00 

Nov. 23 — 1:30 p.m. North Carolina $6.00 

Check or money order must accompany all orders. Add 50# 
to cover cost of insured mail. Address all orders to Business 
Manager, Duke Athletic Association, Durham, North Carolina. 



DUKE UNIVERSITY CALENDAR 
The Duke University Calendar is published 
weekly throughout the year with the exception of 
the various recess periods. The format covers a 
Sunday through Sunday time period. The Cal- 
endar is distributed on campus and through the 
U.S. mail on Friday and Saturday of each week. 
Notices for publications in the Calendar should 
be in typewritten form, signed by the person sub- 
mitting information and should give his phone 
extension. Deadline for submission of copy to the 
Calendar Office, 207 Flowers Building, is Tuesday 
afternoon before 5:00 p.m. This deadline is abso- 
lutely necessary in order that the Calendar may 
be handled by the printers and ready for distribu- 
tion on Friday and Saturday. 

Mailed subscriptions of the Calendar for the 
academic year (September through May) are avail- 
able by sending a check for $2.50, payable to Duke 
University Calendar, to Box KM Duke Station. 
The Calendar Office is located at Room 207 Flowers 
Building, phone extension 2911. 



DUKE UNIVERSITY FALL SEMESTER 
CALENDAR 

The usual semester calendar published by the 
Student Union has not been printed because of 
budget limitations and rising costs. Efforts are 
now being made for a substitute publication which 
will cover a semester time period. Information re- 
garding this publication will be noted in this cal- 
endar as soon as possible. 



IMPORTANT— Notices for the Duke University Calendar should be submitted 

IN WRITTEN FORM to Room 207 Flowers Building, West Campus not later 

than 5:00 p.m., Tuesday. Extension 2911. 



Duke University 

calendar/ 







Sept. 29-Oct. 6, 1968 



Sunday, September 29 

10:20 a.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Chal- 
lenges in Education." WCHL Chapel Hill. 
Dr. Henry Weitz will discuss "Counseling on 
the Campus." 



10:30-10:45 a.m. Carillon Recital. Mr. J. 
Hammond, University Carillonneur. 



Samuel 



11 :00 a.m. University Service of Worship. Univer- 
sity Chapel. Preacher : The Reverend Dr. Wal- 
do Beach, Professor of Christian Ethics. Ser- 
mon: "A Rage for Relevance." Broadcast 
over WDNC and WDNC-FM. 

3:00-5:00 p.m. East Campus Gymnasium: open to 
students, faculty, and staff families for recre- 
ation (swimming, badminton, volleyball, bas- 
ketball, table tennis). 

3 :30-5 :00 p.m. Fall Tea and Open House : Durham 
Branch, American Association of University 
Women. Allied Arts Center, 810 West Proc- 
tor Street. 



4 :00-6 :00 p.m. International 
Campus Drive. 



Open House. 2022 



7 :00 and 9 :00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page Au- 
ditorium. "A MAN FOR ALL SEASONS" 
from the play by Robert Bolt with Wendy Hil- 
ler, Orson Welles, Susannah York, and Paul 
Scofield as Thomas More. 8 Academy Award 
Nominations including Best Picture of the 
Year! "As close as one gets to perfection! Sir 
Thomas More's fight for freedom of conscience 
in 16th Century England." — Cue. 

8:30 p.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Chal- 
lenges in Education." WPTF Raleigh. Mr. 
Burton King will discuss "Noise: A Growing 
Menace." 



Monday, September 30 

4:15 p.m. Zoology Seminar. Room 130 Biological 
Sciences Building. Speaker: Dr. Richard 
Michael. 

4 :15-5 :30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women : 
faculty, staff members, and students. 

5 :15 p.m. Faculty Volleyball. Card Gymnasium. 



Tuesday, October 1 

10 :00 a.m. Divinity School Chapel. University Chap- 
el. Speaker: Dean James T. Cleland. Reader: 
John Early. 

4:00 p.m. Mathematics Colloquium. Room 114 
Physics Building. Speaker: Professor I. I. 
Hirschman. 

4:00 p.m. Forest Ecology Seminar. Room 130 Bio- 
logical Sciences Building. Speaker: Dr. Fred 
Barkalow. 

4:15-5:30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for wom- 
en: faculty, staff members, and students. 

7:30-10:00 p.m. Scottish Country Dancing. (7:30- 
8 :30 Beginning class, no experience necessary) . 
Presbyterian Student Center. 



Wednesday, October 2 

10:00 a.m. Divinity School Chapel. University 
Chapel. Speaker: Dean James T. Cleland. 
Reader: Jim Clark. 

4:15-5:30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. 



7:00-8:00 p.m. Chapel Choir Kehearsal. University 
Chapel. 

7 :00-9 :00 p.m. Open House Badminton for all men 
and women: faculty and students. East Cam- 
pus Gymnasium. 

7 :30 p.m. Tocqueville Society Recorded Lecture : 
Professor Albert H. Hobbs. Room 208 Flowers 
Building. 

8 :00 p.m. Educated Woman Power Lecture : Mrs. 
Esther Peterson. Music Room, East Duke 
Building. 



Thursday, October 3 

10 :00 a.m. Divinity School Chapel. University Chap- 
el. Speaker: Don Davis. Reader: Dr. Charles 
Rogers. 

4:15 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: fac- 
ulty, staff members, and students. 

5:15 p.m. Faculty Volleyball. Card Gymnasium. 

7:30 p.m. Student Union Gallery Talk: Mr. and 
Mrs. Albert J. Kirkpatrick. West Union Gal- 
lery. 

8:00 p.m. Duke-U.N.C. Philosophy Colloquium. 
Speaker: Professor N. L. Wilson. Room 221a 
West Duke Building. 

8:00 p.m. Graduate Wives Club Meeting: Style 
Show by Stewarts. Immaculata School Au- 
ditorium 725 Burch Avenue. 

8 :15-9 :30 p.m. West Campus Swimming Pool open 
to faculty members and their families. Fac- 
ulty children will be admitted only when ac- 
companied by their parents. 



Friday, October 4 

10 :00 a.m. Divinity School Chapel. University Chap- 
el. Special Service by Worship Committee. 

3:30 p.m. Chemistry Staff Seminar. Speaker: Dr. 
David M. Hercules. Room 130 Psychology- 
Sociology Building. 

4:00-7:00 p.m. YW-YMCA Symposium Registra- 
tion : ' ' Toward A New City. ' ' Flowers Lounge, 
Duke University and NCC Student Union. 

4:15-5:30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. Faculty 



daughters, ages 6 to 16, may also swim; those 
10 and under must be accompanied by their 
mothers. 

8 :00 p.m. Student Union Cinematic Arts Commit- 
tee Film Series: "THE BLUE ANGEL" star- 
ring Emil Jannings and Marlene Dietrich. A 
historical classic — the first German sound film 
and one of the most creative pictorial films of 
the period. "PHYLLIS AND TERRY" 
(short) Two young black girls from a poor 
neighborhood are filmed in the course of living 
and explaining themselves. A discussion will 
follow the showing of these two films. Biologi- 
cal Sciences Auditorium. 

8:15 p.m. YW-YMCA Symposium: "Toward A 
New City." Speaker: The Reverend Jesse L. 
Jackson. Page Auditorium. 






Saturday, October 5 

1:55 a.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Chal- 
lenges in Education." WDNC Durham. Dr. 
Henry Weitz will discuss "Counseling on the 
Campus. ' ' 

!:15 p.m. Varsity Football: Duke vs. The Univer- 
sity of Maryland. Oyster Bowl, Norfolk, Vir- 
ginia. 

! :00-5 :00 p.m. East Campus Gymnasium : Open to 
students, faculty, and staff for recreation 
(swimming, badminton, volleyball, basketball, 
table tennis). 

' :00 and 9 :00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page Au- 
ditorium. " 'GOAL' scores a beautiful cine- 
matic victory! Super-charged with excite- 
ment." — Cue. "Truly magnificent! An abso- 
lute must! One comes away from this picture 
with a new appreciation of the game that is 
most widely played in the world!" — N.Y. Post. 
"Certainly something to see! Captures the 
frantic excitement of the World Cup Soccer 
Series!" — Saturday Review. 

:30 p.m. YW-YMCA Symposium: "Toward A 
New City." Panel Discussion: "Where Do 
We Go From Here?" Auditorium, Education 
Building. North Carolina College. 

i:30 p.m. Student Union and YW-YMCA Folk 
Concert: Bernice Reagon and Len Chandler. 
Baldwin Auditorium, Duke University. 



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Sunday, October 6 

10:20 a.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Chal- 
lenges in Education." WCHL Chapel Hill. 
Mr. James Boughton will discuss "A Model 
of the Banking System. ' ' 

10:30-10:45 a.m. Carillon Recital. Mr. J. Samuel 
Hammond, University Carillonneur. 

11 :00 a.m. University Service of Worship. Univer- 
sity Chapel. Preacher: The Reverend Dr. 
James T. Cleland. Broadcast over Radio Sta- 
tion WDNC and WDNC-FM. 

3:00-5:00 p.m. East Campus Gymnasium: open to 
students, faculty, and staff families for recrea- 
tion (swimming, badminton, volleyball, bas- 
ketball, table tennis). 

4:00 p.m. Guest Organ Recital: Dr. Frederick Rim- 
mer. University Chapel. 

4:00-6:00 p.m. International Open House. 2022 
Campus Drive. 

7 :00 and 9 :00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page Au- 
ditorium. ' ' ' GOAL ' scores a beautiful cinema- 
tic victory! Super-charged with excitement." 
— Cue. "Truly magnificent! An absolute 
must! One comes away from this picture with 
a new appreciation of the game that is most 
widely played in the world!" — N.Y. Post. 
"Certainly something to see! Captures the 
frantic excitement of the World Cup Soccer 
Series ! ' ' — Saturday Review. 

8:30 p.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Chal- 
lenges in Education." WPTF Raleigh. Dr. 
Tom Graham will discuss "Heart Function 
Studies. ' ' 



UNIVERSITY SERVICE OF WORSHIP 

Holy Communion will be celebrated at the Uni- 
versity Service of Worship on Sunday, October 6th, 
at 11 :00 a.m. in the University Chapel. The Celebrant 
will be the Reverend Dr. Howard C. Wilkinson, Chap- 
lain to the University, and the Reverend Dr. James 
T. Cleland, Dean of the Chapel, will preach the com- 
munion meditation. 



RELIGIOUS ORGANIZATIONS 
ANNOUNCEMENTS 

EPISCOPAL (UCM) : Sunday, 8 :00 a.m. Holy 
Communion; 9:15 a.m. Choral Eucharist and sermon. 
Thursday, 5 :15 p.m. Holy Communion. 



UNITED CAMPUS CHRISTIAN FELLOW- 
SHIP and WESTMINSTER FELLOWSHIP (UCM) 

The Westminster Fellowship and the United Campus 
Christian Fellowship, nurture groups of the Univer- 
sity Christian Movement, will meet this Sunday eve- 
ning, September 29, in the home of Dr. and Mrs. 
Robert Bonar for a snack supper and to discuss with 
Dr. Harry Smith, Assistant to the Chancellor at 
UNCCH, his new book "Secularization and the Uni- 
versity. ' ' Rides will leave from the East Campus 
Circle at 4:00 p.m. 

The Westminster Fellowship and the United 
Campus Christian Fellowship will meet for dinner 
and worship at 5 :45 p.m. Friday, October 4th, in the 
Westminster House on Alexander Avenue. 



DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY SEMINAR 

The Department of Zoology will hold their weekly 
seminar on Monday, September 30th, at 4:15 p.m. in 
Room 130 of the Biological Sciences Building. Dr. 
Richard Michael of the Institute of Psychiatry in 
London and presently Visiting Professor at Emory 
University in Atlanta, Georgia, will speak on "Hor- 
monal Factors in the Regulation of Primate Behav- 
ior. ' ' Coffee and tea will be served in the foyer at 
4 :00 p.m. 



MATHEMATICS COLLOQUIUM 

The first meeting of the Duke Mathematics Col- 
loquium will take place on Tuesday, October 1st, 
in Room 114 Physics Building. The speaker will be 
Professor I. I. Hirschman, visiting Professor of 
Mathematics from Washington University for the 
current year. His subject will be "The Spectra of 
Toeplitz Matrices." 

At the second meeting on Tuesday, October 15th, 
the speaker will be Dr. Maxwell Shauck of Duke Uni- 
versity. The Mathematics Colloquium plan to meet 
bi-weekly throughout the year, on Tuesdays when 
the schedules of speakers permit. All Colloquium 
meetings are preceded at 3 :30 p.m. in Room 138 Phys- 
ics Building, by tea and coffee. Interested persons are 
cordially invited to attend. 



EDUCATED WOMANPOWER LECTURE 

ESTHER PETERSON, ASSISTANT SECRETARY 

OF LABOR 

Mrs. Esther Peterson, Assistant Secretary of 
Labor, will speak on the role of women in contempo- 
rary society on Wednesday, October 2nd, at 8 :00 
p.m. in the Music Room of East Duke Building. 

Mrs. Peterson, the mother of four children, was 
Director of the Women's Bureau from 1961-1964 and 
was Special Assistant to the President for Consumer 
Affairs, 1964-67. She has been Vice Chairman on the 



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U.S. Committee on the Status of Women since 1961. 
The Committee on Educated Wonianpower will spon- 
sor Mrs. Peterson's visit, and the public is cordially 
invited to attend. 



FOREST ECOLOGY SEMINAR 

On Tuesday, October 1st, Dr. Fred Barkalow, 
Professor of Zoology at North Carolina State Univer- 
sity, will present a talk on the "Management of the 
Umstead State Park." The seminar will be held at 
4:00 p.m. in Room 130 of the Biological Sciences 
Building. 



TOCQUEVILLE SOCIETY RECORDED 
LECTURE 

A recorded lecture, "Orwell's Utopia: Pitfalls of 
Sociology," given by Professor Albert H. Hobbs will 
be presented on Wednesday, October 2nd, at 7 :30 
p.m. in Room 208 Flowers Building. The Tocqueville 
Society sponsoring the lecture is dedicated to the 
examination and discussion of current ideological 
orthodoxy. The public is welcome. 



DUKE-UNC PHILOSOPHY COLLOQUIUM 

Professor N. L. Wilson of the Duke Philosophy 
Department will read a paper entitled ' ' Qualities and 
Quality Reference" on Thursday, October 3rd, at 
8 :00 p.m. in Room 211a West Duke Building. 



GRADUATE WIVES CLUB 

The Graduate Wives Club will hold its first meet- 
ing of the year at the Immaculata School Auditorium, 
725 Burch Avenue, at 8 -.00 p.m. on Thursday, Oc- 
tober 3rd. A style show will be presented by Stew- 
art's. Wives of graduate students and of the graduate 
faculty are cordially invited. 



YW-YMCA SYMPOSIUM: 
NEW CITY' 



'TOWARD A 



Last year the Duke University Community Con- 
cerns Committee presented a three-day conference, 
"Portrait of a Southern City," in which many of the 
problems facing today's urban areas were examined. 
Since that time much attention has been focused on 
the crisis in our cities with the release of the Report 
of the Presidential Commission on Civil Disorders. 

It is the firm belief of the Community Concerns 
Committee that dialogue in this area must continue 
and that specific problems of Durham must be ex- 
amined. With this in mind, North Carolina College 



- 



was contacted and they agreed to co-sponsor with 
Duke a three-day conference, "Toward A New City," 
on Friday through Sunday, October 4th, 5th, and 6th. 
The conference will be held on both the Duke 
campus and the NCC campus with transportation 
provided. On Friday night a major address will be 
given by Reverend Jesse L. Jackson, the national di- 
rector of SCLC's Operation Breadbasket. Seminars 
led by local citj- officials and business men active in 
the community will be held Saturday morning and 
afternoon. Some of the seminar topics include : Police 
and the Urban Crisis, The News Media and the Ur- 
ban Crisis, Public Housing, The University and So- 
cial Change, The Role of the Church in the Urban 
Crisis, and Education and the Urban Crisis. On 
Saturday evening, a panel consisting of community 
and university people will try and bring together 
many of the topics examined in the conference and 
examine the question, "Where Do We Go From 
Here ? " A special feature of the Symposium will be 
a concert by Bernice Reagon and Len Chandler, folk- 
singers who appeared in last year's Duke Folk Festi- 
val. On Sunday workshops will be held examining 
specific areas where university students can get in- 
volved in working for social change. 



CHEMISTRY STAFF SEMINAR 

Dr. David M. Hercules, Massachusetts Institute 
of Technology, will speak at the Chemistry Staff Sem- 
inar on Friday, October 4th, at 3 :30 p.m. in Room 
130 Psychology-Sociology Building. The subject of 
Dr. Hercules' address will be " Chemiluminescent 
Mechanisms. ' ' All interested persons are cordially in- 
vited to attend. 



FOLK CONCERT 
BERNICE REAGON AND LEN CHANDLER 

The Student Union's Special Projects Committee 
and the YMCA will ©©-sponsor a- folk concert by Ber- 
nice Reagon and Len Chandler on Saturday evening, 
October 5th, at 9 :30 p.m. in Baldwin Auditorium. 
Tickets priced at $1.50 are on sale in Page Box 
Office, on the Quad and at the door. Those registering 
for the symposium "Toward A New City" may pur- 
chase tickets at a 500 reduction. 

The folk singers will be remembered from their 
performance at last year's Folk Festival. Bernice 
Reagon, born and raised in the traditional Afro- 
American folk music of the rural South, is a student 
of that cultural history and relays the spirit of the 
black American through her music,-danee, folk tales, 
and language. A former member of The Freedom 
Singers, she has sung for various student groups and 
has performed in coffeehouses, churches, and concert 
halls across the nation. Described as a big voice with 
a personal and loving manner, she has also lectured 
to various groups on Afro-American cultural history. 
She "is undeniably one of the most commanding new 



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talents iu American folk music." Len Chandler is a 
singer-guitarist who has been active in the folk music 
field since the late 1950 's. Robert Shelton of the 
N.Y. Times says of his latest work: "His melodies, 
arrangements, and lyrics have new subtleties and 
polish. The mature fusion of words, music line, and 
guitar work have put him far beyond his folk-topical 
blues past . . . Mr. Chandler is clearly a composer- 
performer to watch." Len is a native of Akron, 
Ohio, and holds a Master's degree in Music from Co- 
lumbia University. His musical background was 
initially classical; it was not until his graduate days 
in New York that he fell in love with folk music. 



GUEST ORGAN RECITAL 

A guest organ recital will be presented by Profes- 
sor Frederick Rimmer of the University of Glasgow, 
Scotland, in the Duke University Chapel on Sunday, 
October 6th, at 4:00 o'clock in the afternoon. Pro- 
fessor Rimmer, Gardiner Professor of Music at the 
University of Glasgow, is also Director of "The Scot- 
tish Music Archives." 

On Saturday, October 5th, Professor Rimmer will 
conduct a master class at 2 :00 p.m. in the Duke Uni- 
versity Chapel. No admission will be charged for 
either of these two events and the University com- 
munity and general public are cordially invited to 
attend. 

The recital program is as follows : 

Prelude and Fugue in D J. 8. Bach 

Prelude, Scherzo and Passacaglia, 

Op. 41 (1963) Kenneth Leighton 

Trio-Sonata No. 4 in E minor J. S. Bach 

Five Preludes on Scottish 

Psalm Tunes (1960) Frederick Rimmer 

Commotio, Op. 58 (1931) Nielsen 



STUDENT UNION ART EXHIBITION 
JAPANESE WOODBLOCK COLOR PRINTS 

An exhibition of 77 Japanese Woodblock Color 
Prints from the collection of Mr. and Mrs. Albert J. 
Kirkpatrick of New York City opened in the West 
Union Lounge on Sunday, September 15th. The Stu- 
dent Union Graphic Arts Committee invites the pub- 
lic to this initial showing. Many of the prints will 
be offered for sale during the time the exhibit will 
be on display (September 15-October 15 from 8:00 
a.m.-10:00 p.m.) 



The Kirkpatrick 's have been collecting Japanese 
prints for more than 30 years in many parts of the 
United States as well as in Europe and the Orient. 
A large part of their collection of some 1500 prints 
comes from Japan and from the ateliers of the artists. 

The Boston Museum of Fine Arts, the Brooklyn 
Museum, the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Art in 
Philadelphia as well as galleries in New York City 
and in Washington, D. C. have acquired outstanding 
prints from this collection. The owners have given 
exhibitions at a number of colleges in Georgia and 
Florida, in the Garden Center at Rich's in Atlanta, 
and at the Columbus Museum of Arts and Crafts. 

The selection to be shown at Duke University rep- 
resents a cross-section of the whole collection and con- 
fines itself to Hanga prints, those of the first half 
of the 20th Century. Landscapes, Kunadori (actor 
make-up), Actor Portraits, Bijin (female beauties 
and Kua Cho (similar to our still life) will be in- 
cluded, these being the styles in which the Japanese 
artist traditionally expresses himself. There are, 
however, some examples of the abstract design so 
favored by the contemporary artist, on display. 

The 26 artists represented will feature the works 
of the Yoshida family, Hasui, Shinsui, Shunsen, Tad- 
amasa, Shiro and TomikickirS among others whose 
names may be less familiar to Western art lovers. 

On October 3rd Mr. and Mrs. Kirkpatrick will give 
an informal gallery talk on the collection, at 7:30 
p.m. in the West Union Gallery, bringing for this 
purpose a special selection of Ukiyo-e prints of the 
19th Century, showing works by Hokusai, Hiro- 
shige i, Utamaro, Kunisada and Toyokini. They will 
also present some over-size prints and variations of 
the standard Oban size. 



CAMPUS CONCERNS DRIVE 

The Campus Concerns Drive is the only student 
charity drive held on the Duke University Campus. 
Each year, donations to the drive go to charities with 
a local, national, or international outreach. This 
fall's drive will send gifts to World University Ser- 
vice, which aids students in foreign nations and for- 
eign students studying in the United States; the 
American Cancer Society, a private organization 
helping to combat the nation's number two cause of 
death ; and the Edgemont Community Center, which 
seeks to work with the poor in Durham. 

The Drive will be held from October 28th-Novem- 
ber 1st. 



IMPORTANT — Notices for the Duke University Calendar should be submitted 

IN WRITTEN FORM to Room 207 Flowers Building, West Campus not later 

than 5:00 p.m., Tuesday. Extension 2911. 



Duke University 

3ALENDAR_ 




.Oct. 6-13, 1968 



Sunday, October 6 

10:20 a.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Chal- 
lenges in Education." WCHL Chapel Hill. 
Mr. James Boughton will discuss "A Model 
of the Banking System." 

10 :30 a.m. Unitarian-Universalist Fellowship. Allied 
Arts Building. General discussion on "What 
is Worship ? ' ' 

10:30-10:45 a.m. Carillon Recital. Mr. J. Samuel 
Hammond, University Carillonneur. 

11 :00 a.m. University Service of Worship. Univer- 
sity Chapel. World Wide Communion. Preach- 
er: The Reverend James T. Cleland, Dean of 
the Chapel. Celebrant: The Reverend Dr. 
Howard C. Wilkinson, Chaplain to the Univer- 
sity. Broadcast over Radio Station WDNC and 
WDNC-FM. 
3 :00-5 :00 p.m. East Campus Gymnasium : open to 
students, faculty, and staff families for recrea- 
tion (swimming, badminton, volleyball, bas- 
ketball, table tennis). 
4 :00 p.m. Guest Organ Recital : Dr. Frederick Rim- 

mer. University Chapel. 
4:00-6:00 p.m. International Open House. 2022 
Campus Drive. Speaker: Dr. Apostolos Con- 
dos. 
7 :10 and 9 :00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page Au- 
ditorium. " 'GOAL' scores a beautiful cine- 
matic victory! Super-charged with excite- 
ment." — Cue. "Truly magnificent! An abso- 
lute must! One comes away from this picture 
with a new appreciation of the game that is 
most widely played in the world!" — N.T. Post. 
' ' Certainly something to see ! Captures the 
frantic excitement of the World Cup Soccer 
Series!" — Saturday Review. 
8:30 p.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Chal- 
lenges in Education." WPTF Raleigh. Dr. 
Tom Graham will discuss "Heart Function 
Studies." 



Monday, October 7 

9 :00 a.m. The final examination of Mr. David Gagan 
for the Ph.D. degree in History. Room 237 
Social Science Building. 



2 :00 p.m. The final examination of Mr. Joseph 
Gaither Walser, III for the Ph.D. degree in 
Religion. Room 210 Divinity Building. 

4 :15-5 :30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women : 
faculty, staff members, and students. 

5 :15 p.m. Faculty Volleyball. Card Gymnasium. 

8 :00 p.m. Erasmus Club meeting. Green Room, 
East Duke Building. Speaker: Professor 
Bruce Wardropper. 



Tuesday, October 8 

10:00 a.m. Divinity School Chapel Service. Univer- 
sity Chapel. Speaker: The Reverend Donald 
J. Welch. 

2 :00-5 :00 p.m. Campus Club reception honoring 
Newcomers, University House. 1508 Pinecrest 
Road. 

4:15 p.m. Joint Seminar: Departments of Zoology 
and Anatomy. Speaker: Dr. Donald Brown. 

4:15-5:30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for wom- 
en : faculty, staff members, and students. 

7 :30 p.m. Trinity College Historical Society meet- 

ing. Participants: Professors John Oates, 
Harold Parker, and Theodore Ropp. 
7:30-10:00 p.m. Scottish Country Dancing (7:30- 
8 :30 Beginning Class, no experience neces- 
sary). Presbyterian Student Center. 

8 :00 p.m. Forest Ecology Seminar. Room 130 Bio- 

logical Sciences Building. Speaker: Mr. Her- 
man Haeruman. 
8 :00 p.m. Duke-UNC Cooperative Program in Rus- 
sian and East European Studies. Speaker: 
Dr. Kasimir Grzybowski. Faculty Lounge. 
Dey Hall, UNC. 



Wednesday, October 9 

10:00 a.m. Divinity School Chapel Service. Univer- 
sity Chapel. Speaker: The Reverend Donald 
J. Welch. 
4:00 p.m. Program in Comparative Studies on 
Southern Asia. Room 130 Psychology-Sociol- 
ogy Building. Speaker : Dr. D. P. Pattanayak. 



4 :15-5 :30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women : 
faculty, staff members, and students. 

7 :00 p.m. Student Union Duplicate Bridge Session. 
Green Room, East Duke Building. 

7 :00-8 :30 p.m. Chapel Choir Rehearsal. University 
Chapel. 

7 :00-9 :00 p.m. Open House Badminton for all men 

and women : faculty and students. East Cam- 
pus Gymnasium. 

8 :00 p.m. Open Lecture : Duke Citizens for Hurnph- 

rey-Muskie. Room 139 Social Science Build- 
ing. Speaker: Professor Stephen Bailey. 
8:00-10:00 p.m. Duke Young Republicans Club 
Meeting: "Speak to the Candidates." Page 
Auditorium. 



Thursday, October 10 

10 :00 a.m. Divinity School Chapel Service. Univer- 
sity Chapel. Speaker: Mrs. Ann Pearce. 

4:00-5:00 p.m. Undergraduate Faculty Council 
Meeting. Room 208 Flowers Building. 

4 :15-5 :30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women : 
faculty, staff members, and students. 

5:15 p.m. Faculty Volleyball. Card Gymnasium. 

8 :15-9 :30 p.m. West Campus Swimming Pool open 
to faculty members and their families. Fac- 
ulty children will be admitted only when ac- 
companied by their parents. 



Friday, October 11 

9 :00 a.m.-6 :30 p.m. Alumni Registration, Alumni 
House. 2138 Campus Drive. (See special no- 
tice). 
10:00 a.m. Divinity School Chapel Service. Univer- 
sity Chapel. Special service by Duke Endow- 
ment Student Association. 
12:30 p.m. Plant Ecology Seminar. Room 144 Bio- 
logical Sciences Building. Speaker: Mr. James 
Teeri. 

3:00 p.m. Department of Religion Lecture: Father 
Roland de Vaux. Room 139 Social Science 
Building. 

4 :15-5 :30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women : 
faculty, staff members, and students. Faculty 
daughters, ages 6 to 16, may also swim; those 
10 and under must be accompanied by their 
mothers. 

8:00 p.m. Homecoming Show: "The Blue and 
White." Indoor Stadium. 



Saturday, October 12 

Undergraduate third and fourth period classes 
will be suspended on Saturday, October 12th 
for Homecoming Day. 
9:55 a.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Chal- 
lenges in Education." WDNC Durham. Mr. 
James Boughton will discuss "A Model of the 
Banking System." 



2 :00 p.m. Varsity Football : Duke vs. The Univer- 
sity of Virginia. Stadium. 

3 :00-5 :00 p.m. East Campus Gymnasium : Open to 
students, faculty, and staff for recreation 
(swimming, badminton, volleyball, basketball, 
table tennis). 

7 :00 and 9 :10 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page Au- 
ditorram. "THE TAMING OF THE 
SHREW" with Richard Burton and Elizabeth 
Taylor, directed by Franco Zeffirelli. In color. 
' ' A gorgeous piece of film-making ! The vir- 
tues of this production are so many, the achieve- 
ments so splendid, that not much is required 
of the critic than a listing of what is available 
for the price of admission. We have been mar- 
velously served by Richard Burton at his ab- 
solute best, and Elizabeth Taylor is magnificent, 
attacking the role with blazing fury! A new 
standard for filmic treatment of the classics 
has been established. Tremendous fun!" — 
Hollis Alpert, Saturday Review. 

7:00 p.m. Student Union Major Attraction: Simon 
and Garfunkel. Indoor Stadium. 



Sunday, October 13 

10:20 a.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Chal- 
lenges in Education." WCHL Chapel Hill. 
Dr. Vladimir Treml will discuss "The Soviet 
Economy." 

10 :30 a.m. Unitarian-Universalist Fellowship. Allied 
Arts Building. Speaker : Professor Erdman 
Palmore. 

10:30-10:45 a.m. Carillon Recital. Mr. J. Samuel 
Hammond. University Carillonneur. 

11 :00 a.m. University Service of Worship. Univer- 
sity Chapel. Preacher : Bishop Earl G. Hunt, 
Jr., Presiding Bishop, Charlotte Area United 
Methodist Church. Broadcast over Radio Sta- 
tion WDNC and WDNC-FM. 
2 :00 p.m. Duke University Concert Band Lawn 

Concert. Duke Gardens. 
4:00-6:00 p.m. International Open House. 2022 

Campus Drive. 
7 :00 and 9 :10 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page Au- 
ditorium. "THE TAMING OF THE 
SHREW" with Richard Burton and Elizabeth 
Taylor, directed by Franco Zeffirelli. In color. 
"A gorgeous piece of film-making! The vir- 
tues of this production are so many, the achieve- 
ments so splendid, that not much is required 
of the critic than a listing of what is available 
for the price of admission. We have been mar- 
velously served by Richard Burton at his ab- 
solute best, and Elizabeth Taylor is magnificent, 
attacking the role with blazing fury! A new 
standard for filmic treatment of the classics 
has been established. Tremendous fun!" — ■ 
Hollis Alpert, Saturday Review. 
8:30 p.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Chal- 
lenges in Education." WPTF Raleigh. Dr. 
Jack Blanton will discuss "The Gulf Stream 
Boundary. ' ' 



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UNIVERSITY SERVICE OF WORSHIP 
Holy Communion will be celebrated at the Uni- 
versity Service of Worship on Sunday, October 6th, 
at 11 :00 a.m. in the University Chapel. The Celebrant 
will be the Reverend Dr. Howard C. Wilkinson, Chap- 
lain to the University, and the Reverend Dr. James 
T. Cleland, Dean of the Chapel, will preach the com- 
munion meditation. 



RELIGIOUS GROUP ANNOUNCEMENTS 
EPISCOPAL (UCM) : Sunday, 8 :00 a.m. Holy 
Communion ; 9 :15 a.m. Choral Eucharist and sermon ; 
5 :00 p.m. Council Meeting. Thursday, 5 :15 p.m. Holy 
Communion. 

UNITED CAMPUS CHRISTIAN FELLOW- 
SHIP and WESTMINSTER FELLOWSHIP 
(UCM) : will meet this Sunday evening, October 
6, at the home of the John Kernodles, 2921 Wel- 
come Drive, for a snack supper and to discuss, "The 
New Left" with Dr. Reuel Tyson, Professor of Re- 
ligion at UNCCH. Rides will leave from the East 
Campus Circle at 5 :30 p.m. Friday, October 11, 5 :45 
p.m. dinner, worship and discussion in the Westmin- 
ster House on Alexander Avenue. 



UNITARIAN-UNIVERSALIST FELLOWSHIP 
The Unitarian-Universalist Fellowship of Durham 
and Chapel Hill meets at the Allied Arts Building 
(Proctor and Vickers Streets) on Sunday mornings 
at 10 :30 a.m. On October 6th there will be a general 
discussion on the topic "What is Worship?" On 
October 13th, Professor Erdman Palmore of the De- 
partment of Sociology will speak on the subject, "The 
Decline of Orthodox Religion." 

Student Religious Liberals, a student affiliate of 
the Unitarian-Universalist Society, does not have a 
chapter at Duke University. Any students interested 
in forming a chapter, or in expanding the existing 
UNC chapter into a joint operation, should contact 
Professor Charles Tanford, Department of Bio- 
chemistry, extension 5998. 



INTERNATIONAL CLUB 
All members of the Duke community are invited 
to the Open House held each Sunday afternoon from 
4 :00-6 :00 p.m. at the International House, 2022 Cam- 
pus Drive. 

On Sunday, October 6th, Dr. Apostolos Condos of 
the Economics Department will speak on "The Cur- 
rent Situation in Greece." Last year Dr. Condos gave 
a similar talk which proved to be of the utmost inter- 
est to those interested in both Greece and in American 
foreign policy. This year his talk will be of special 
interest because it will follow the September 28th 
plebiscite concerning the new Greek situation. 



GUEST ORGAN RECITAL 
A guest organ recital will be presented by Profes- 
sor Frederick Rimmer of the University of Glasgow, 
Scotland, in the Duke University Chapel on Sunday, 



October 6th, at 4:00 o'clock in the afternoon. Pro- 
fessor Rimmer, Gardiner Professor of Music at the 
University of Glasgow, is also Director of "The Scot- 
tish Music Archives." 

On Saturday, October 5th, Professor Rimmer will 
conduct a master class at 2 :00 p.m. in the Duke Uni- 
versity Chapel. No admission will be charged for 
either of these two events and the University com- 
munity and general public are cordially invited to 
attend. 

The recital program is as follows : 

Prelude and Fugue in D J. S. Bach 

Prelude, Scherzo and Passacaglia, 

Op. 41 (1963) Kenneth Leighton 

Trio-Sonata No. 4 in E minor J. S. Bach 

Five Preludes on Scottish 

Psalm Tunes (1960) Frederick Rimmer 

Commotio, Op. 58 (1931) Nielsen 



STUDENT UNION ART EXHIBITION 
JAPANESE WOODBLOCK COLOR PRINTS 

An exhibition of 77 Japanese Woodblock Color 
Prints from the collection of Mr. and Mrs. Albert J. 
Kirkpatrick of New York City opened in the West 
Union Lounge on Sunday, September 15th. The Stu- 
dent Union Graphic Arts Committee invites the pub- 
lic to this initial showing. Many of the prints will 
be offered for sale during the time the exhibit will 
be on display (September 15-October 15 from 8:00 
a.m.-10:00 p.m.) 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. David Gagan for 
the Ph.D. degree in History will be held on Monday, 
October 7th at 9 :00 a.m. in Room 237 Social Science 
Building. The subject of Mr. Gagan 's dissertation is 
"The Queen's Champion: The Life Of George Taylor 
Denison III Soldier, Author, Magistrate And Cana- 
dian Tory Patriot." 

The committee to conduct the examination con- 
sists of Professors Richard A. Preston, John R. Al- 
den, Theodore Ropp and Clarence Gohdes. Professor 
Preston will preside. 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. Joseph Gaither 
Walser, III for the Ph.D. degree in Religion will be 
held on Monday, October 7th at 2 :00 p.m. in Room 
210 Divinity Building. The subject of Mr. Walser 's 
dissertation is "A Study Of Selected Economic Fac- 
tors And Their Contribution To The Understanding 
Of The History Of Palestine During The Hellenistic 
Period." 

The committee to conduct the examination con- 
sists of Professors William Stinespring, Kenneth 
Clark, James Price, Orval Wintermute and John 
Oates. Professor Stinespring will preside. 



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ERASMUS CLUB MEETING 
The Erasmus Club will have its first meeting of 
the year on Monday, October 7th, at 8 :00 p.m. in the 
Green Room of the East Duke Building. The speaker 
will be Professor Bruce Wardropper, William H. 
Wannamaker, Professor of Romance Languages. His 
topic will be "The Interpretation of Calderon's Wife- 
Murder Plays." 

All faculty members and graduate students are 
invited to attend. There will be refreshments and in- 
formal discussion afterwards. 



CAMPUS CLUB RECEPTION 
The Campus Club will hold a reception honoring 
all newcomers on Tuesday, October 8th, from 2 :00 
to 5 :00 p.m. at the University House, 1508 Pinecrest 
Road. At this meeting members may pay dues and 
register for study groups. Mrs. Oliver Ferguson is 
chairman for the reception. Hostess department is 
English. 



JOINT DEPARTMENTAL SEMINAR. 
ZOOLOGY AND ANATOMY 

The Department of Zoology and the Department 
of Anatomy will hold a joint seminar on Tuesday, Oc- 
tober 8th, at 4:15 p.m. in Room 111 Biological Sci- 
ences Building. Dr. Donald Brown of the Department 
of Embryology at Carnegie Institution in Baltimore, 
Maryland, will speak on "Ribosomal RNA, Its Genes 
and Amphibian Development." Dr. Brown, who has 
been at the Carnegie Institution since 1956, is a 
graduate of Dartmouth College, and has an M.D. 
degree from the University of Chicago. His research 
deals primarily with the biochemistry of oogenesis and 
early development. 

Coffee and tea will be served in the foyer at 4 :00 
p.m. 



TRINITY COLLEGE HISTORICAL 
SOCIETY MEETING 

The Trinity College Historical Society is pleased 
to announce its first program of the 1968-69 academic 
year. This meeting will be held on Tuesday, October 
8th, in the West Union Ballroom at 7 :30 p.m. 

Speaking to a topic which we think will evoke 
wide interest and many questions will be three well- 
known members of our faculty: Professors John 
Oates, Harold Parker, and Theodore Ropp. The target 
of their observations will be "The Generalist and his 
Problems." 

All members of the Trinity College Historical So- 
ciety as well as any interested persons are encouraged 
to attend and participate in the discussion. Coffee 
will be served prior to the meeting. 



FOREST ECOLOGY SEMINAR 
On Tuesday, October 8th, Mr. Herman Haeruman, 
a graduate student at Duke University, will present 
a talk on the ' ' Management of Teak Forests in Java. ' ' 
The seminar will be held in Room 130 Biological Sci- 
ences Building at 8 :00 p.m. 



SLAVIC COLLOQUIUM 
Dr. Kasimir Grzybowski of the Duke University 
World Rule of Law Center will address the Coopera- 
tive Program in Russion and East European Studies 
of Duke University and the University of North Caro- 
lina on Tuesday, October 8th at 8 :00 p.m. in the 
Faculty Lounge (fourth floor) of Dey Hall on the 
University of North Carolina campus. His topic will 
be "Soviet Law and Modern Society." This is first 
in the series of 1968-69 colloquia to be sponsored by 
the Cooperative Program and all members and friends 
of the program are cordially invited. 



LECTURE BY INDIAN LINGUIST 
The Program in Comparative Studies on Southern 
Asia will sponsor its first public lecture of the year 
on Wednesday, October 9th, at 4:00 p.m. in Room 
130 Psychology-Sociology Building. The speaker will 
be Dr. D. P. Pattanayak, Chief Linguist of the Ameri- 
can Institute of Indian Studies. He will speak on 
"The English Language in India: A Retrospect." 
Among Dr. Pattanayak 's books is an Indian Lan- 
guages Bibliography of grammars, dictionaries, and 
teaching materials. He has also co-authored a text- 
book on Kumauni grammar with Dr. Mahadeo L. 
Apte, chairman of the Duke University South Asia 
Program. 



STUDENT UNION DUPLICATE BRIDGE 
SESSION 

Duplicate Bridge will begin again this fall, meet- 
ing Wednesday nights in the Green Room East Duke 
Building at 7 :00 p.m. The first meeting will be 
Wednesday, October 9th and all interested persons are 
invited. A short organizational meeting will precede 
the playing session. For further information con- 
tact the Student Activities Office, extension 2618 or 
2911. 



OPEN POLITICAL ADDRESS 
Professor Stephen Bailey, Dean of the Maxwell 
School of Citizens and Public Affairs at Syracuse 
University, a former Rhodes Scholar and co-chair- 
man of New York Citizens for Humphrey-Muskie, 
will speak on behalf of Hubert Humphrey on Wednes- 
day, October 9th, at 8 :00 p.m. in Room 139 Social 
Science Building. The University community is in- 
vited to this program which is sponsored by the Duke 
Committee for Humphrey-Muskie. 



UNDERGRADUATE FACULTY COUNCIL 

The Undergraduate Faculty Council will meet 
from 4 :00-5 -.00 p.m. on Thursday, October 10th, in 
Room 208 Flowers Building. 



PLANT ECOLOGY SEMINAR 
The Plant Ecology luncheon seminar discussion 
will be led by Mr. James Teeri, graduate student in 
Botany, at 12 :30 p.m., Friday, October 11th, in Room 
144 Biological Sciences Building. The topic is "The 
Ecology of Raised Bogs." 



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DEPARTMENT OF RELIGION LECTURE 
Father Roland de Vaux, distinguished archeolo- 
gist and Biblical scholar, will lecture on the subject 
"The Exodus, Historical Fact and Article of Faith," 
in Room 139 Social Science Building on Friday, Oc- 
tober 11th at 3 :00 p.m. Father de Vaux is a member 
of the Dominican Order, who for many years served as 
the Director of Ecole Biblique et Archeologique Fran- 
caise in Jerusalem. In addition to his administrative 
work at tbe school, he has served as active field di- 
rector of many well known excavations. Most recently 
he has been involved with the excavation of Jeru- 
salem as part of a joint project with the British 
School of Archaeology. One of his most outstanding 
contributions to Biblical studies was made as Chief 
Editor of the Bible de Jerusalem. 



STUDENT UNION MAJOR ATTRACTION 
"SIMON AND GARFUNKEL" 

The Duke University Student Union Major At- 
tractions Committee will present the well known 
folk duo, "Simon and Garfunkel," in a concert on 
Saturday, October 12th at 7 :00 p.m. in the Indoor 
Stadium. Tickets priced at $4.00 for reserved seats 
and $3.50 and $2.50 for unreserved are available at 
the outside West Quadrangle ticket booth. No phone 
reservations will be accepted ; an early sell-out is ex- 
pected. 

A new and significant trend in the bourgeoning 
popularity of folk music on the American musical 
scene has been the advent of the urban folk singer — 
the city-bred youngster who sings of the unique joys 
and trials of life in the megapolis ; the alienation, the 
excitement, the loneliness, the joys that are peculiar 
to and so much a part of life in the Big Town. 

In the realm of urban-oriented folk music, no 
new act has caused such excitement as the fine new 
duo, Simon and Garfunkel whose recording and back- 
ground music of "The Graduate" have marked them 
as a vital new force on the folk scene. 

Paul Simon, a native of Newark, New Jersey and 
Art Garfunkel, a New Yorker, met in the sixth grade 
and have been singing together since they were four- 
teen. Initially confining their vocalizing to school 
functions and private gatherings, they eventually 
stepped out into the world of professional performing 
at the well known Manhattan Center of the folk 
world, Gerde's Folk City. 

Since then, Paul and Art, who write and arrange 
most of their own material, have been heard at the 
Gaslight and the Bitter End, New York City, and in 
concerts at universities across the nation as well as 
on national TV and radio. 



DUKE UNIVERSITY CONCERT BAND 
LAWN CONCERT 

An afternoon lawn concert will be presented by 
the Duke University Concert Band on Sunday, Oc- 
tober 13th, at 2 :00 p.m. in the Duke Gardens. The pro- 
gram will include pops and light classical selections 
to appeal to all tastes. 



Marches — American (Sousa), Austrian (Strauss), 
Spanish (Texidor). 

Overtures — Gay Nineties Tunes (Lang), Show 
Music of I DO! I DO! (Schmidt), La Gazza Ladra 
(Rossini; conducted by student Kern Holoman, Ra- 
leigh, N. C, conducting student of Allan H. Bone). 

Salute to Election Year — Wintergreen for Presi- 
dent (Gershwin) and other selections. 

Admission is free. Some chairs will be provided 
or one may supply his own blanket or folding chair. 

The Duke University Concert Band is under the 
direction of Dr. Paul R. Bryan. 



ADVANCE NOTICE 
UNIVERSITY FACULTY MEETING 
The University Faculty will meet on Tuesday, 
October 15th, at 4 :00 p.m. in the Engineering Audi- 
torium. 



CAMPUS CONCERNS DRIVE 
The Campus Concerns Drive is the only student 
charity drive held on the Duke University Campus. 
Each year, donations to the drive go to charities with 
a local, national, or international outreach. This 
fall's drive will send gifts to World University Ser- 
vice, which aids students in foreign nations and for- 
eign students studying in the United States; the 
American Cancer Society, a private organization 
helping to combat the nation's number two cause of 
death; and the Edgemont Community Center, which 
seeks to work with the poor in Durham. 

The Drive will be held from October 28th-Novem- 
ber 1st. 



1968 HOMECOMING SCHEDULE 

Friday, October 11 

9:00 a.m.- 6:30 p.m. — Alumni Registration, Alumni House, 
2138 Campus Drive. 

6 :00-800 p.m. — Judging of Campus Displays. West Campus 
Dormitory Quadrangle. This is the best time to see the 
displays. 

8 :00 p.m. — Homecoming Show : "The Blue and White" In- 
door Stadium. 

Saturday, October IS 

9:00 a.m.- 2:00 p.m. — Alumni Registration. Alumni House. 

10:00-11:30 a.m.— Law School Coffee. Law School Building. 

10:00-11:30 a.m.— Faculty wives Coffee Hour for Engineering 

Alumni, their families, faculty, staff and guests. 
11 :30 a.m.- 2:00 p.m. — Alumni Barbecue. Indoor Stadium, 

West Campus. 
2:00 p.m. — Varsity Football Game. Duke vs. Virginia. Duke 

Stadium. 
4 :30 p.m. — Fraternity and Independent Open Houses. 
8:00 p.m. — Simon and Garfunkel, Student Union Major At- 
traction. Indood Stadium. 

Sunday, October 13 
11 :00 a.m. — University Worship Service. Bishop Earl G. 
Hunt, Jr.— Bishop of the Charlotte Area, United Metho- 
dist Church. 



IMPORTANT — Notices for the Duke University Calendar should be submitted 

IN WRITTEN FORM to Room 207 Flowers Building, West Campus not later 

than 5:00 p.m., Tuesday. Extension 2911. 



Duke University 



D 




Oct. 13-20, 1968 



Sunday, October 13 

10:20 a.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Chal- 
lenges in Education." WCHL Chapel Hill. 
Dr. Vladimir Treml will discuss "The Soviet 
Economy." 
10:30-10:45 a.m. Carillon Recital. Mr. J. Samuel 

Hammond, University Carillonneur. 
11 :00 a.m. University Service of Worship. Univer- 
sity Chapel. Preacher : Bishop Earl G. Hunt, 
Jr., Presiding Bishop, Charlotte Area United 
Methodist Church. Broadcast over Radio Sta- 
tion WDNC and WDNC-FM. 

2 :00 p.m. Duke University Concert Band Lawn 
Concert. Duke Gardens. 

4:00-6:00 p.m. International Open House. 2022 
Campus Drive. 

7 :00 and 9 :00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page Au- 
ditorium. "THE TAMING OF THE 
SHREW" with Richard Burton and Elizabeth 
Taylor, directed by Franco Zeffirelli, in color. 
"A gorgeous piece of film-making! The vir- 
tues of this production are so many, the achieve- 
ments so splendid, that not much is required 
of the critic than a listing of what is available 
for the price of admission. We have been mar- 
velously served by Richard Burton at his ab- 
solute best, and Elizabeth Taylor is magnificent, 
attacking the role with blazing fury ! A new 
standard for filmic treatment of the classics 
has been established. Tremendous fun!" — 
Hollis Alpert, Saturday Review. 

8:30 p.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Chal- 
lenges in Education." WPTF Raleigh. Dr. 
Jack Blanton will discuss "The Gulf Stream 
Boundary. ' ' 

Monday, October 14 

9 :30-ll :00 a.m. WSGA Lounge Open. Lobby, East 

Campus Union. 
2:00 p.m. The final examination of Mr. Rufus Led- 

ford Moretz for the Ph.D. degree in Religion. 

Room 210 Divinity Building. 
4:15-5:30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 

faculty, staff members, and students. 
5:15 p.m. Faculty Volleyball. Card Gymnasium. 
7 :30 p.m. American Association of University 

Women Meeting. YWCA, Chapel Hill Street. 



8:00 p.m. DUERAC Meeting. Room 136 Social 
Sciences Building. 



Tuesday, October 15 

9 :30-ll :00 a.m. WSGA Lounge Open. Lobby, East 
Campus Union. 
10:00 a.m. Divinity School Chapel Service. Univer- 
sity Chapel. Speaker : Dr. Ray C. Petry. Read- 
er : Mr. Tom Zuhlke. 
10 :00 a.m. Duke Law Forum. Room 103 Law Build- 
ing. Speaker: Dr. Herbert Spiegel. 

4 :00 p.m. University Faculty Meeting. Auditorium, 
Engineering Building. 

4:00 p.m. Forest Ecology Seminar. Room 130 Bio- 
logical Sciences Building. Speaker : Mr. Jack 
Frankel. 

4:15-5:30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for wom- 
en: faculty, staff members, and students. 

7:30-10:00 p.m. Scottish Country Dancing (7:30- 
8 :30 Beginning Class, no experience neces- 
sary). Presbyterian Student Center. 

8:15 p.m. Student Union Major Speakers Series: 
Michael Harrington. Page Auditorium. Re- 
ception following in Taylor House. 



Wednesday, October 16 

9:30-11:00 a.m. WSGA Lounge Open. Lobby, East 

Campus Union. 
10 :00 a.m. Divinity School Chapel Service. Univer- 
sity Chapel. Speaker : Dr. Ray C. Petry. Read- 
er: Mr. Abe Cox. 
10:10 a.m. The final examination of Miss Ruby Leila 
Wilson for the Ed.D. degree in Education. 
Room 08A West Duke Building. 

3:00 p.m. S. U. Major Speaker Seminar: Michael 
Harrington, Room 208 Flowers Building. 

4:00 p.m. Psychology Colloquium. Room 130 Psy- 
chology-Sociology Building. Speaker: Dr. Ir- 
ving T. Diamond. 

4:00 p.m. Joint Departmental Seminar: Zoology, 
Physiology, Pharmacology. Speaker : Dr. Theo- 
dore Jalin. Lecture Room, 1st Floor, Medical 
Sciences Building. 



4:15-5:30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. 

7 :00-8 :30 p.m. Chapel Choir Rehearsal. University 
Chapel. 

7 :00-9 :00 p.m. Open House Badminton for all men 
and women: faculty and students. East Cam- 
pus Gymnasium. 

7:30 p.m. Duke-U.N.C. National Security Policy 
Seminar. Speaker: Professor Makoto Monioi. 
Phillips Hall, U.N.C. 

8:00 p.m. Graduate English Club Meeting. Room 
130 Psychology-Sociology Building. Speaker: 
Mr. Reynolds Price. 



Thursday, October 17 

9 :30-ll :00 a.m. WSGA Lounge Open. Lobby, East 

Campus Union. 

10 :00 a.m.-7 :00 p.m. Student Union Exhibition-Sale. 

Original Graphics from London Grafica Arts. 

Room 101 West Union Building. 

10:00 a.m. Divinity School Chapel Service. Celestial 

Omnibus Coffee House Service of Worship. 
12 :30 p.m. Kappa Delta Pi Luncheon Meeting. East 
Campus Union. Speaker: Dr. Mary Huse. 

2:00 p.m. The final examination of Mrs. Nicolette 
Friederich Brown for the Ph.D. degree in His- 
tory. Room 102 West Duke Building. 

4 :15 p.m. Joint Departmental Seminar : Zoology, 
Physiology, Pharmacology. Speaker : Dr. Theo- 
dore Jahn. Lecture Room, 1st Floor, Medical 
Sciences Building. 

4:15-5:30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. 

5 :15 p.m. Faculty Volleyball. Card Gymnasium. 

8 :00 p.m. Department of Classical Studies Lecture. 
Speaker: Dr. Anthony R. Birley. Room 130 
Psychology-Sociology Building. 

8 :15-9 :30 p.m. West Campus Swimming Pool open 
to faculty members and their families. Fac- 
ulty children will be admitted only when ac- 
companied by their parents. 

8:15 p.m. Duke Players Performance :" Rashomon " 
by Fay and Michael Kanin. Branson Hall. 
Tickets: Students— $1.50 ; Faculty— $1.75 ; 
General Admission — $2.00. 



Friday, October 18 

9 :30-ll :00 a.m. WSGA Lounge Open. Lobby, East 

Campus Union. 
10 :00 a.m.-7 :00 p.m. Student Union Exhibition-Sale. 

Original Graphics from London Grafica Arts. 

Room 101 West Union Building. 
10 :00 a.m. Divinity School Chapel Service. Celestial 

Omnibus Coffee House Service of Worship. 
10:30 a.m. The final examination of Colonel Thomas 

Everett Griess for the Ph.D. degree in History. 

Room 231 Allen Building. 
3:30 p.m. Chemistry Staff Seminar. Speaker: Dr. 

John M. Daly. Room 130 Psychology-Sociology 

Building. 



4:15-5:30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. Faculty 
daughters, ages 6 to 16, may also swim; those 
10 and under must be accompanied by their 
mothers. 

8 :00 p.m. Student Union Cinematic Arts Committee 
Film Series: "THE WORLD OF APU." A 
magnificent picture of Indian culture — Satya- 
jit Ray's finest film in his famous trilogy of 
Indian life. Here is the story of Apu's young 
manhood, his life as a poor writer in the city, 
his lyrical marriage, his flight from reality, 
his relationship to his young son. Whether 
considered as a study of one man or as a 
beautiful evocation of modern and traditional 
India, a masterpiece. Bengali dialog with En- 
glish subtitles. Black and White, 103 minutes. 
"FLYING MAN"— Short. Auditorium, Bio- 
logical Sciences Building. 

8:15 p.m. Duke Players Performance: "Rashomon" 
by Fay and Michael Kanin. Branson Hall. 
Tickets : Students— $1.50 ; Faculty— $1.75 ; 
General Admission — $2.00. 



Saturday, October 19 

9:55 a.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Chal- 
lenges in Education." WDNC Durham. Dr. 
Vladimir Treml will discuss "The Soviet 
Economy." 

3 :00-5 :00 p.m. East Campus Gymnasium : Open to 
students, faculty, and staff for recreation 
(swimming, badminton, volleyball, basketball, 
table tennis). 

7 :00 and 9 :00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page Au- 
ditorium. Prize winning Czechoslovakian film, 
"THE SHOP ON MAIN STREET" starring 
Ida Kaminska and Josef Kroner. "A stunning 
picture that knocked us off of our chairs ! Bril- 
liant performances ! Memorable ! One of the 
most devastating pictures I've seen from Eu- 
rope or anywhere else in several years ! ' ' — Bos- 
ley Crowther, N.Y. Times. "Masterpiece!" — 
Life, Los Angeles Times, N.T. World Telegram, 
Time Magazine. 

8:15 p.m. Chamber Arts Society: Concentus Musi- 
cus. Music Room, East Duke Building. 

8:15 p.m. Duke Players Performance :" Rashomon " 
by Fay and Michael Kanin. Branson Hall. 
Tickets: Students— $1.50; Faculty— $1.75 ; 
General Admission — $2.00. 



Sunday, October 20 

10:20 a.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Chal- 
lenges in Education." WCHL Chapel Hill. 
Dr. Virginia Stone will discuss "Training 
Nurses for the Elderly." 

11 :00 a.m. University Service of Worship. Univer- 
sity Chapel. Preacher: The Reverend Profes- 
sor Robert E. Cushman, Dean of the Divinity 
School. Broadcast over Radio Station WDNC 
and WDNC-FM. 



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10:30-10:45 a.m. Carillon Recital. Mr. J. Samuel 
Hammond, University Carillonneur. 

4:00-6:00 p.m. International Open House. 2022 
Campus Drive. 

7 :00 and 9 :00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page Au- 
ditorium. Prize winning Czechoslovakian film, 
"THE SHOP ON MAIN STREET" starring 
Ida Kaminska and Josef Kroner. ' ' A stunning 
picture that knocked us off of our chairs ! Bril- 
liant performances ! Memorable ! One of the 
most devastating pictures I've seen from Eu- 
rope or anywhere else in several years ! ' ' — Bos- 
ley Crowther, N.Y. Times. "Masterpiece!"- — 
"Life, Los Angeles Times, N.Y. World Tele- 
gram, Time Magazine. 

8 :00 p.m. Documentary Film-Lecture : The Sur- 
vivors. Room 130 Psychology-Sociology Build- 
ing. 

8:30 p.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Chal- 
lenges in Education." WPTP Raleigh. Dr. 
Henry Weitz will discuss ' ' Counseling on the 
Campus. ' ' 



RELIGIOUS GROUP ANNOUNCEMENTS 
UNITED CAMPUS CHRISTIAN FELLOW- 
SHIP AND WESTMINSTER FELLOWSHIP: nur- 
ture groups of the University Christian Movement, 
will meet this Sunday evening, October 13th at the 
home of the Don Millers, 713 Anderson Street, for a 
snack supper and discussion. Rides will leave from 
the East Campus Circle at 5 :30 p.m. On Friday, 
October 18th, there will be dinner, worship and dis- 
cussion in the Westminster House on Alexander 
Avenue at 5 :45 p.m. 

EPISCOPAL: Sunday, 8:00 a.m. Holy Com- 
munion; 9:15 a.m. Choral Eucharist and sermon. 
Thursday, 5 :15 p.m. Holy Communion. 

CATHOLIC : Sunday, 9 :30 a.m. Mass. Room 130 
Psychology-Sociology Building. Confessions before 
Mass at 9 :00-9 :25 a.m. in Room 144 Psychology-Soci- 
ology Building. 



DUKE UNIVERSITY CONCERT BAND 
LAWN CONCERT 

An afternoon lawn concert will be presented by 
the Duke University Concert Band on Sunday, Oc- 
tober 13th, at 2 :00 p.m. in the Duke Gardens. The pro- 
gram will include pops and light classical selections 
to appeal to all tastes. 

Marches — American (Sousa), Austrian (Strauss), 
Spanish (Texidor). 

Overtures — Gay Nineties Tunes (Lang), Show 
Music of I DO! I DO! (Schmidt), La Gazza Ladra 
(Rossini; conducted by student Kern Holoman, Ra- 
leigh, N. C, conducting student of Allan H. Bone). 

Salute to Election Year — Wintergreen for Presi- 
dent (Gershwin) and other selections. 

Admission is free. Some chairs will be provided 
or one may supply his own blanket or folding chair. 

The Duke University Concert Band is under the 
direction of Dr. Paul R. Bryan. 



UNITARIAN-UNIVERSALIST FELLOWSHIP : 
The Unitarian-Universalist Fellowship of Durham 
and Chapel Hill meets at the Allied Arts Building 
(Proctor and Vickers Streets) on Sunday mornings 
at 10:30 a.m. On October 13th, Professor Erdman 
Palmore of the Department of Sociology, will speak 
on the subject, "The Decline of Orthodox Religion." 
On October 20th, Professor Dan Livingston of the 
Department of Zoology, will speak on the subject, 
"Man and His Environment." Student Religious 
Liberals, a student affiliate of the Unitarian Univer- 
salist Society, does not have a chapter at Duke Uni- 
versity. Any students interested in forming a chap- 
ter, or in expanding the existing UNC chapter into 
a going operation, should contact Professor Charles 
Tanford, Department of Biochemistry, extension 
5998. 



WSGA LOUNGE 

All students and faculty are invited to attend the 
newly opened "lounge" sponsored by WSGA. It is 
meant to provide an informal atmosphere where stu- 
dents and faculty can meet and talk. Coffee and 
sweet rolls are available for a minimal charge and 
national newspapers are being provided. Located in 
the lobby of the East Campus Union, the lounge is 
open Monday through Friday from 9 :30-ll :00 a.m. 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. Rufus Ledford 
Moretz for the Ph.D. degree in Religion will be held 
on Monday, October 14th at 2:00 p.m. in Room 210 
Divinity Building. The subject of Mr. Moretz 's 
dissertation is "The Textual Affinity Of The Earliest 
Coptic Manuscripts Of The Gospel Of John." 

The committee to conduct the examination con- 
sists of Professors Kenneth W. Clark, William F. 
Stinespring, James L. Price, Orval S. Wintermute 
and William H. Willis. Professor Clark will pre- 
side. 



AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF 
UNIVERSITY WOMEN 
The American Association of University Women, 
Durham Branch, will meet on Monday, October 14th, 
at 7:30 p.m. at the YWCA on Chapel Hill Street. 
The program, on the topic News Media in a Changing 
Society, features local news reporters Marty Johnson 
of WTVD and Ann Colarusso of the Durham Morn- 
ing Herald. All women college graduates in the Dur- 
ham area are invited to attend. 



"MEET THE CANDIDATES NIGHT" 
NON-ACADEMIC EMPLOYEES COUNCIL 
An open meeting of candidates for the Technical 
and Clerical Division of the Non-Academic Employees 
Council will be held at 8:00 p.m., Monday, October 
14th, in Room 136 Social Sciences Building on West 
Campus. 



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Employees will have a chance to meet the candi- 
dates and question them about their aims for the new 
Council. All technical and clerical employees from 
the medical center and campus are invited to attend. 
The meeting will be chaired by a member of the tem- 
porary Duke University Employee Relations Advis- 
ory Committee (DUERAC). 



DUKE LAW FORUM 
Dr. Herbert Spiegel, a noted authority on hyp- 
nosis and truth drugs, will speak at the Duke Law 
Forum on Tuesday, October 15th. The Forum will 
be held in Room 103 Law Building at 10:00 a.m. 



UNIVERSITY FACULTY MEETING 
The University Faculty will meet on Tuesday, Oc- 
tober 15th, at 4:00 p.m. in the Engineering Audi- 
torium. 



FOREST ECOLOGY SEMINAR 
Mr. Jack Frankel, Agricultural Specialist from 
the Office of Planning, Programming, and Review of 
the Peace Corps, will present a talk on "The Peace 
Corps and Forestry" at the Forest Ecology Seminar 
on Tuesday, October 15th, at 4:00 p.m. in Room 130 
Biological Sciences Building. 



S. U. MAJOR SPEAKERS SERIES : 
MICHAEL HARRINGTON 

The Student Union Major Speakers Series will 
present Michael Harrington on Tuesday and Wednes- 
day, October 15th and 16th. His Tuesday night ad- 
dress, ' ' Toward a Democratic Left, ' ' will be presented 
in Page Auditorium at 8 :15 p.m. Wednesday after- 
noon. A seminar will be held in Room 208 Flowers 
Building at 3 :00 p.m. This will focus on the poverty 
program and will present varying points of view on 
the issue. Those wishing to attend are requested to 
call Extension 2911 for a reservation. 

Michael Harrington, a native of St. Louis, Mis- 
souri, received his education at Holy Cross College, 
Yale University Law School, and the University of 
Chicago, where he received a Master of Arts degree 
in English Literature in 1949. He was associate edi- 
tor of The Catholic Worker from 1951 to 1953, when 
he became organizational secretary for the Workers 
Defense League. His social work at the Catholic 
Worker House in New York led to studies of Ameri- 
can industry, social alienation, and institutionalized 
poverty. 

A member of the Socialist Party since 1953, he has 
participated in the civil rights and disarmament 
movements of the past decade. He has worked on 
the Fund for the Republic's Study of Blacklisting 
in the entertainment industry and served as con- 
sultant to the Trade Union Project of the Fund for 
the Republic. He is now chairman of the board of the 
League for Industrial Democracy and an advisor to 
the government on problems of poverty and unem- 
ployment. 



Mr. Harrington is best known for his book, The 
Other America, which provided the intellectual stim- 
ulus underlying the national antipoverty programs. 
His latest book. Toward a Democratic Left, is an ex- 
ploration of the major social deformities of the Ameri- 
can system and an outline for a radical program of 
action. 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE ED.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Miss Ruby Leila Wilson 
for the Ed.D. degree in Education will be held on 
Wednesday, October 16th at 10 :10 a.m. in Room 
08A West* Duke Building. The subject of Miss Wil- 
son's dissertation is "Climate And Process For 
Change Within A Liberal Arts College." 

The committee to conduct the examination con- 
sists of Professors Allan S. Hurlburt, W. A. Stumpf, 
Henry Sublett, Everett Hopkins and Donald Roy. 
Professor Hurlburt will preside. 



PSYCHOLOGY COLLOQUIUM 
The Department of Psychology will hold a collo- 
quium on Wednesday, October 16th, in Room 130 
Psychology-Sociology Building at 4:00 p.m. Dr. 
Irving T. Diamond, Professor in the Department of 
Psychology will speak on "Evolution of neocortex: 
the organization and function of visual cortex in 
tree shrews and hedgehogs." 



JOINT DEPARTMENTAL SEMINAR 
ZOOLOGY, PHYSIOLOGY, PHARMACOLOGY 

The Department of Zoology and the Department of 
Physiology and Pharmacology will hold a joint sem- 
inar on Wednesday, October 16th, at 4:00 p.m., in 
the Lecture Room, 1st Floor, Medical Sciences Build- 
ing. Dr. Theodore Jahn of the Department of Zoology 
at U.C.L.A. will speak on "Physical Ion Exchange 
Mechanisms in Organisms: Paramecium to Man." 

Dr. Jahn is a member of the Department of Zool- 
ogy at U.C.L.A. His main interests have been with the 
protozoa, where his studies on various aspects of 
motility and ionic regulation have greatly increased 
our understanding of amoeboid motion, of ciliary and 
flagellar action and of the relationship between ion 
binding in membranes and motility. His film studies 
of ciliary and flagellar motion are esthetically beau- 
tiful as well as scientifically valuable. 



DUKE-UNC NATIONAL SECURITY 
POLICY SEMINAR 
The first meeting of the Duke-UNC National Se- 
curity Policy Seminar for 1968-69 will be held in 
Phillips Hall, at the University of North Carolina, 
Chapel Hill, on Wednesday, October 16th at 7:30 
p.m. The guest speaker will be Professor Makoto 
Momoi of Takushoku University, Tokyo. He is known 
for his work on Strategy at the National Defense 
College, Tokyo and for his translations of the works 
of Henry- Kissinger and Herman Kahn. 



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GRADUATE ENGLISH CLUB MEETING 
Mr. Reynolds Price, novelist in residence, will 
address the Graduate English Club on Wednesday, 
October 16th, at 8 :00 p.m. in Room 130 Sociology- 
Psychology Building. His topic, "Notes for the 
Mineshaft; an Afterword to A Generous Man," 
should be of interest to students of contemporary 
fiction. The public is cordially invited. 



S. U. EXHIBITION-SALE 
LONDON GRAFICA ARTS 

The London Grafica Arts will present a collection 
of original graphics in an exhibition-sale on Thursday 
and Friday, October 17th and 18th iu Room 101 West 
Union Building from 10 :00 a.m.-7 :00 p.m. The exhi- 
bition is under the sponsorship of the Student Union 
Graphic Arts Committee. 

This important collection of prints is making a 
tour of colleges and universities through the U.S.A. 
enabling students and faculty to view about 500 
works seen usually only in major galleries or mu- 
seums. 

A wide range of the history of prints is covered 
from 16th century manuscript pages; old masters, 
such as Rembrandt and Durer; 18th, 19th, and 20th 
century examples; modern masters — Picasso, Braque, 
Chagall; and a wide range of superb contemporary 
prints commissioned especially by London Arts. 

All the prints are original, that is, they have been 
printed directly from the plate or stone that the 
artist himself has done. All prints are for sale at 
prices ranging from $10.00 to $3,000. The London 
Arts representative on hand is well informed and 
most eager to answer questions about the prints or 
about graphic arts in general. 



KAPPA DELTA PI MEETING 
Kappa Delta Pi, Education Honorary, will hold 
its second meeting of the year in the East Campus 
Union on Thursday, October 17th at 12 :30 p.m. Dr. 
Mary Huse of the Department of Medical Psychology 
will speak on "Issues in Education for the Disabled." 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mrs. Nicolette Friederieh 
Brown for the Ph.D. degree in History will be held 
on Thursday, October 17th at 2 :00 p.m. in Room 102 
West Duke Building. The subject of Mrs. Brown's 
dissertation is "Ultra-Royalist Deputies In The 
Chambre Introuvable, 1815-1816." 

The committee to conduct the examination con- 
sists of Professors Harold T. Parker, William B. 
Hamilton, Richard L. Watson and Jacques Hardre. 
Professor Parker will preside. 



JOINT DEPARTMENTAL SEMINAR 

ZOOLOGY, PHYSIOLOGY, PHARMACOLOGY 

The Department of Zoology and the Department 

of Physiology and Pharmacology will hold a second 

joint seminar on Thursday, October 17th at 4 :15 p.m. 



in Room 111 Biological Sciences Building. Dr. Theo- 
dore Jahn of the Department of Zoology at U.C.L.A. 
will speak on "The Movement of Flagella and Cilia." 
Coffee and tea will be served in the foyer at 4 :00 p.m. 



DEPARTMENT OF CLASSICAL STUDIES 
LECTURE 

The Department of Classical Studies will hold its 
first public lecture on Thursday, October 17th, at 
8:00 p.m. in Room 130 Psychology-Sociology Build- 
ing. Dr. Anthony R. Birley, Lecturer in Ancient His- 
tory, University of Leeds, England and Visiting Lec- 
turer in Ancient History at Duke University, will 
give an illustrated talk on ' ' The Governors of Roman 
Britain." 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Colonel Thomas Everett 
Griess for the Ph.D. degree in History will be held 
on Friday, October 18th at 10:30 a.m. in Room 231 
Allen Building. The subject of Colonel Griess' dis- 
sertation is "Dennis Hart Mahan: West Point Pro- 
fessor And Advocate Of Military Professionalism, 
1830-1871." 

The committee to conduct the examination con- 
sists of Professors Theodore Ropp, Harold T. Parker, 
Robert H. Woody and Hugh Hall. Professor Ropp 
will preside. 



CHEMISTRY STAFF SEMINAR 
Dr. John M. Daly from the National Institutes of 
Health, Bethesda, Maryland, will speak at the Chem- 
istry Staff Seminar on Friday, October 18th at 3 :30 
p.m. in Room 130 Psychology-Sociology Building. 

The subject of Dr. Daly's address will be "The 
NIH Shift : Chemical Models for Enzymatic Hydroxy - 
lation of Aromatic Rings. ' ' All interested persons are 
cordially invited to attend. 



DOCUMENTARY FILM-LECTURE ON 
VIETNAM SURVIVORS 

A documentary film on Vietnam, The Survivors, 
will be shown at 8 :00 p.m. Sunday, October 20th, in 
Room 130 Psychology-Sociology Building as part of 
a program to enlist support for a local chapter of 
the Committee of Responsibility (COR) to save war- 
burned and war-injured Vietnamese children. 

Discussing the film and the work of COR will be 
Dr. Herbert L. Needleman, National Chairman of the 
Committee and staff psychiatrist at Temple Univer- 
sity School of Medicine in Philadelphia. Dr. Needle- 
man has worked in Vietnam selecting children to be 
brought to the United States for medical treatment 
and has been instrumental in establishing local chap- 
ters of COR in this country. At present chapters 
exist in Boston, Philadelphia, Washington, San Fran- 
cisco and Los Angeles. 

Administrators and faculty members at Duke 
and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 



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are interested in establishing a local chapter in this 
area and welcome community support. 



CHAMBER ARTS SOCIETY 
PRESENTS CONCENTUS MUSICUS 
The Chamber Arts Society announces the first 
concert of its 1968-1969 season, to be played Satur- 
day, October 19th at 8:15 p.m. in the Music Room, 
East Duke Building, by the CONCENTUS MUSI- 
CUS, an ensemble of 12 musicians from Vienna. They 
will play a program of music by Telemann, Antonio 
Vivaldi and J. S. Bach on original instruments of the 
period. The program follows: 

Overture with Suite in B Flat Major 

for two Oboes, Bassoon, Strings and 
Harpsichord G. P. Telemann 

Concerto in G Minor for Strings and 

Harpsichord Antonio Vivaldi 

Quartet in G Minor for Flauto Traverso, 
Oboe, Violin, Bassoon and 
Harpsichord Antonio Vivaldi 

Trio Sonata in C Major (BWV 1037) 
for two Violins, Harpsichord and 
Violoncello J. S. Bach 

Brandenburg Concerto No. 4 in G Major 
(BWV 1049) for Violin, two Re- 
corders, Strings, and Harpsichord ... J. S. Bach 

Admission is by Membership Card or Guest Card. All 
Membership Cards have been subscribed for the year, 
the limit of 375 having been reached. Guest Cards in 
limited number, up to the total room capacity of 420 
seats, will be available from 7 :30 to 8 :00 p.m. at the 



door of the Music Room before the concert. Guest 
Cards are priced at $2.50 for a single admission, and 
may not be reserved in advance except by members 
of the Society. 

Other chamber music concerts scheduled for this 
season include : 

Saturday, November 9 : Brazilian Quartet 
Saturday, December 7: Hungarian Quartet 
Saturday, January 18: Borodin Quartet (Moscow) 
Saturday, February 8 : Igor Kipnis (Harpsichord) 
Saturday, March 22 : Fine Arts Quartet 
Inquiries may be addressed to The Chamber Arts 
Society, Box 6065 College Station. 



ADVANCE NOTICE 
"CURLEW RIVER" 



Tickets, priced at $3.00, $2.50, $2.00 (all seats 
reserved), are now available in the Page Box Office 
for the presentation of the profoundly moving musi- 
cal drama of Benjamin Britten's "Curlew River." 
The opera will be performed by first desk players of 
the New York Little Orchestra Society and five vocal 
soloists drawn from the leading American Opera 
Companies, plus a male chorus. Thomas Scherman, 
distinguished founder, music director, and conduc- 
tor of The Little Orchestra Society will conduct this 
beauty "parable for church perf orntance. " "Curlew 
River" is presented under the auspices of the Stu- 
dent Union's Performing Arts Committee and the 
Special Observances Committee of the Duke Univer- 
sity Religious Council who last year brought the NY. 
Pro Musica performance of "The Play of Daniel." 



IMPORTANT — Notices for the Duke University Calendar should be submitted 

IN WRITTEN FORM to Room 207 Flowers Building, West Campus not later 

than 5:00 p.m., Tuesday. Extension 2911. 



Duke University 

^ALENDAR_ 



C 




Oct. 20-27, 1968 



Sunday, Octobeiv20 

10:20 a.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Chal- 
lenges in Education." WCHL Chapel Hill. 
Dr. Virginia Stone will discuss "Training 
Nurses for the Elderly." 
11 :00 a.m. University Service of "Worship. Univer- 
sity Chapel. Preacher : The Reverend Profes- 
sor Robert E. Cushman, Dean of the Divinity 
School. Sermon : ' ' Invincible Ignorance. ' ' 
Broadcast over Radio Station WDNC and 
WDNC-FM. 
10:30-10:45 a.m. Carillon Recital. Mr. J. Samuel 
Hammond, University Carillonneur. 

4:00-6:00 p.m. International Open House. 2022 
Campus Drive. 

7 :00 and 9 :00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page Au- 
ditorium. Prize winning Czeehoslovakian film, 
"THE SHOP ON MAIN STREET" starring 
Ida Kaminska and Josef Kroner. "A stunning 
picture that knocked us off of our chairs ! Bril- 
liant performances ! Memorable ! One of the 
most devastating pictures I've seen from Eu- 
rope or anywhere else in several years ! ' ' — Bos- 
ley Crowther, N.Y. Times. "Masterpiece!" — 
Life, Los Angeles Times, N.Y. World Tele- 
gram, Time Magazine. 

8:00 p.m. Documentary Film-Lecture: "The Sur- 
vivors." Room 130 Psychology-Sociology 
Building. 

8:15-9:30 p.m. Pan-Hellenic Sing. Baldwin Au- 
ditorium. No Charge. 

8:30 p.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Chal- 
lenges in Education." WPTP Raleigh. Dr. 
Henry Weitz will discuss "Counseling on the 
Campus." 



Monday, October 21 

9 .-30-11 :00 a.m. WSGA Lounge Open. Lobby, East 
Campus Union. 

4:00 p.m. Psychology Colloquium. Room 139 Social 
Science Building. Speaker : Dr. Robert A. But- 
ler. 

4:15 p.m. Zoology Seminar. Room 111 Biological 
Sciences Building. Speaker: Dr. George C. 
Gorman. 



4 :15-5 :30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women : 
faculty, staff members, and students. 

8 :00 p.m. YM-YWCA Conference on Latin America. 
Auditorium, Biological Sciences Building. 



Tuesday, October 22 

9 :30-ll :00 a.m. WSGA Lounge Open. Lobby, East 

Campus Union. 
10:00 a.m. Divinity School Chapel Service. Univer- 
sity Chapel. Speaker: Dr. Frederick Herzog. 
Reader: Miss Sheryl Scrimsher. 
10 :30 a.m. Duke Hospital Auxiliary Luncheon Meet- 
ing. Holiday Inn Downtown. Speaker: Dr. 
Barnes Woodhall. 

4 :00 p.m. Mathematics Colloquium. Room 114 
Physics Building. Speaker: Dr. Maxwell 
Shauck. 

4:00 p.m. Forest Ecology Seminar. Room 130 Bio- 
logical Sciences Building. Speaker: Dr. Benee 
F. Swindel. 

4 :00 p.m. Duke University Council on Aging and 
Human Development. Room 1504 Gerontology 
Building, Duke Hospital. Speaker: Dr. Peter 
H. Klopfer. 

4:15-5:30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for wom- 
en: faculty, staff members, and students. 

7:00-8:30 p.m. Arts and Crafts Workshop: Mr. 
Frank Creech. Basement, The Ark. 

7:30-10:00 p.m. Scottish Country Dancing. Presby- 
terian Student Center. 

8 :00 p.m. YM-YWCA Conference on Latin America. 
Auditorium, Biological Sciences Building. 



Wednesday, October 23 

9 :30-ll :00 a.m. WSGA Lounge Open. Lobby, East 

Campus Union. 
10:00 a.m. Divinity School Chapel Service. Univer- 
sity Chapel. Speaker: Dr. Frederick Herzog. 
Reader : Mr. Ron Browning. 

4 :15-5 :30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women : 
faculty, staff members, and students. 

7 :00-8 :30 p.m. Chapel Choir Rehearsal. University 
Chapel. 

7 :00-9 :00 p.m. Open House Badminton for all men 



and women : faculty and students. East Cam- 
pus Gymnasium. 
7:00 p.m. Duplicate Bridge Club meeting. Green 
Room East Duke Building. 



Thursday, October 24 

9 :30-ll :00 a.m. WSGA Lounge Open. Lobby, East 
Campus Union. 
10:00 a.m. Divinity School Chapel Service. Univer- 
sity Chapel. Speaker: Mr. Charles Schuster. 
Reader : Dr. James M. Efird. 

4:00 p.m. Academic Council Meeting. Room 208 
Flowers Building. 

4:15-5:30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. 

5:15 p.m. Faculty Volleyball. Card Gymnasium. 

8 :15-9 :30 p.m. "West Campus Swimming Pool open 
to faculty members and their families. Fac- 
ulty children will be admitted only when ac- 
companied by their parents. 



Friday, October 25 

9 :30-ll :00 a.m. WSGA Lounge Open. Lobby, East 

Campus Union. 
10:00 a.m. Divinity School Chapel Service. Univer- 
sity Chapel. Speaker: Mr. David Pacholke. 

3 :30 p.m. Chemistry Staff Seminar. Room 130 Psy- 
chology-Sociology Building. Speaker: Profes- 
sor Julian M. Sturtevant. 

4 :00 p.m. Phi Beta Kappa Fall Meeting. Room 208 
Flowers Building. 

4:15-5:30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. Faculty 
daughters, ages 6 to 16, may also swim; those 
10 and under must be accompanied by their 
mothers. 

7:00 p.m. "Curlew River" Seminar: Professor Iain 
Hamilton. Room 208 Flowers Building. 

8:00 p.m. Duke University Faculty Club Meeting. 
Basement of Teer House, 4019 Roxboro Road. 
Followed by dance at 8 :30 p.m. 

8:15 p.m. Student Union Performing Arts Com- 
mittee: "Curlew River." University Chapel. 



Saturday, October 26 

9:55 a.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Chal- 
lenges in Education." WDNC Durham. Dr. 
Virginia Stone will discuss "Training Nurses 
for the Elderly." 

3 :00-5 :00 p.m. East Campus Gymnasium : Open to 
students, faculty, and staff for recreation 
(swimming, badminton, volleyball, basketball, 
table tennis). 

7 :00 and 9 :00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page Au- 
ditorium. "IN THE HEAT OF THE NIGHT" 
with Rod Steiger and Sidney Poitier. "Mod- 
ern classic in genre of movie detective stories 
. . . stunning example of how to weave sus- 



pense, character, tension, and action into eon- 
temporary situation. In this case, a murder in 
the deep South touches off sparks. Enjoyable, 
brittle acting." — Cue. In color. 



Sunday, October 27 

10:20 a.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Chal- 
lenges in Education." WCHL Chapel Hill. 
Dr. Everett H. Ellinwood, Jr. will discuss 
' ' Amphetamine Intoxication. ' ' 
10:30-10:45 a.m. Carillon Recital. Mr. J. Samuel 

Hammond, University Carillonneur. 
11 :00 a.m. University Service of Worship. Univer- 
sity Chapel. Preacher: The Reverend Profes- 
sor Thomas A. Langford, Head of the Depart- 
ment of Religion. Broadcast over Radio Sta- 
tion WDNC and WDNC-FM. 

3:00 p.m. Guest Carillon Recital: Mr. Milford 
Myhre, Carillonneur, Bok Tower. 

4:00-6:00 p.m. International Open House. 2022 
Campus Drive. 

7 :00 and 9 :00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page Au- 
ditorium. "IN THE HEAT OF THE NIGHT" 
with Rod Steiger and Sidney Poitier. "Mod- 
ern classic in genre of movie detective stories 
. . . stunning example of how to weave sus- 
pense, character, tension, and action into con- 
temporary situation. In this case, a murder 
in the deep South touches off the sparks. En- 
joyable, brittle acting." — Cue. In color. 

8:30 p.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Chal- 
lenges in Education!" WPTF Raleigh. Mr. 
James Boughton will discuss "A Model of the 
Banking System. ' ' 



UNIVERSITY SERVICE OF WORSHIP 
The Reverend Professor Robert E. Cushman, Dean 
of the Divinity School, will deliver the sermon at the 
University Service of Worship on Sunday, October 
20th, at 11:00 a.m. in the University Chapel. The 
order of worship follows : 

The Reverend Elmer O. Hall, Assistant Chaplain 
to the University, Presiding Minister. 

The Reverend Peter M. Wohlwend, President, Co- 
ordinating Council of the Divinity School, Lector. 

Opening Organ Voluntary 

Choral Adoration — "Osanna I" from Mass in 

G Minor R. Vaughan Williams 

Hymn of Praise 

Unison Prayer of Confession and for Pardon 

Words of Assurance 

Anthem — "Gloria" from Mass in 

G Minor Vaughan Williams 

Scripture Lesson— John 9:13-18, 24-30, 34-39 

The Gloria Patri 

Greeting and Call to Prayer 

Pastoral Prayers of Thanksgiving, Intercession, and 

Supplication 
The Lord's Prayer 
Sermon — "Invincible Ignorance" 
Prayer 



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Hymn 

The Offering 

Offertory Organ Interlude 

Anthem — "Credo" from 

Mass in G Minor 

Response — The Doxology 
Prayer of Dedication 
Benediction 

Choral Response — "Sevenfold Amen" 
The Chimes 
Closing Organ Voluntary 



Vaughan Williams 



Stainer 



RELIGIOUS GROUP ANNOUNCEMENTS 
Episcopal (UCM) : Sunday, 8 :00 a.m. Holy Com- 
munion; 9:15 p.m. Choral Eucharist and sermon. 
Thursday, 5 :15 p.m. Holy Communion. 

United Campus Christian Fellowship and West- 
minster Fellowship (UCM) : Sunday evening, Oc- 
tober 20th, Snack supper and discussion at the home 
of the Theo Pilkingtons, 2718 Spencer. Rides will 
leave from the East Campus Circle at 5 :30 p.m. Fri- 
day, October 25th, dinner, worship, and discussion at 
5:45 p.m. in the Westminster House on Alexander 
Avenue. 

Catholic: Sunday, 9:30 a.m. Mass, Room 130 
Psychology-Sociology Building. Confessions before 
Mass from 9 :00-9 :25 a.m. in Room 144 Psychology- 
Sociology Building. 

Unitakian-Universalist Fellowship of Durham 
and Chapel Hill meets at the Allied Arts Building 
(Proctor and Vickers Streets) on Sunday mornings 
at 10:30 a.m. On October 20th, Professor Dan Liv- 
ingston, of the Department of Zoology, will speak on 
the subject, "Man and His Environment." On Oc- 
tober 27th, Professor Henry Clark, of the Department 
of Religion, will speak on the subject, "Ethics and 
Modern Technology." 



DOCUMENTARY FILM-LECTURE 
VIETNAM SURVIVORS 



ON 



A documentary film on Vietnam, The Survivors, 
will be shown at 8 :00 p.m. Sunday, October 20th, in 
Room 130 Psychology-Sociology Building as part of a 
program to enlist support for a local chapter of the 
Committee of Responsibility (COR) to save war- 
burned and war-injured Vietnamese children. 

Discussing the film and the work of COR will be 
Dr. Herbert L. Needleman, National Chairman of the 
Committee and staff psychologist at Temple Univer- 
sity School of Medicine in Philadelphia. Dr. Needle- 
man has worked in Vietnam selecting children to be 
brought to the United States for medical treatment 
and has been instrumental in establishing local chap- 
ters of COR in this country. At present chapters exist 
in Boston, Philadelphia, Washington, San Francisco 
and Los Angeles. 

Administrators and faculty members at Duke and 
the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill are 
interested in establishing a local chapter in this area 
and welcome community support. 



PSYCHOLOGY COLLOQUIUM 
The Department of Psychology will hold a collo- 
quium on Monday, October 21st, in Room 139 Social 
Science Building at 4:00 p.m. Dr. Robert A. Butler 
from the University of Chicago Medical School will 
speak on "Habituation of the Cortical Potentials in 
Man Evoked by Auditory Stimuli." 



ZOOLOGY SEMINAR 



The Department of Zoology will hold its weekly 
seminar on Monday, October 21st at 4:15 p.m. in 
Room 111 Biological Sciences Building. Dr. George 
C. Gorman, a Miller Research Professor at the Uni- 
versity of California at Berkeley, will speak on "In- 
terspecific Hybridization in Anolis : An Analysis of 
Proteins, Chromosomes, and Behavior." 

Dr. Gorman is a generalist who sees the diversity 
of lizard species as an excuse to apply cytogenetic, 
biochemical, and behavioral methods to the questions 
of zoogeography. Coffee and tea will be served in 
the foyer at 4 :00 p.m. 



YM-YWCA CONFERENCE ON LATIN AMERICA 
The National International Affairs Committee of 
the YM-YWCA is sponsoring a conference on Latin 
America. Discussions will be held Monday and Tues- 
day nights, October 21st and 22nd at 8 :00 p.m. in 
the auditorium of the Biological Sciences Building. 
The participants in the discussions will be Paul 
Sweezy, noted Marxist and former Harvard Professor 
of Socialism; Edward Boorstein, author of The Eco- 
nomic Transformation of Cuba; Robert Smith, James 
B. Duke Professor and Chairman, Economics Depart- 
ment; and John Martz, Political Science Professor, 
University of North Carolina and author of several 
works on change in Latin America. 

The topic to be discussed Monday night is "The 
United States and Latin America — Exploitation or 
Aid?" The topic Tuesday night will be "The United 
States and Cuba — Model or Mistake?" 



DUKE HOSPITAL AUXILIARY 
FALL MEMBERSHIP LUNCHEON MEETING 
The Duke Hospital Auxiliary will have a luncheon 
meeting at the Holiday Inn Downtown on Tuesday, 
October 22nd. The business meeting will begin at 
10:30 a.m. Dr. Barnes Woodhall, Associate Provost 
of the University, will speak at 11 :00 a.m. on the 
topic "Year 2000." 



MATHEMATICS COLLOQUIUM 
The Mathematics Colloquium will meet on Tues- 
day, October 22nd, at 4 :00 p.m. in Room 114 Physics 
Building. The speaker will be Dr. Maxwell Shauck, 
a new member of the Mathematics Department, hav- 
ing come from Yale University. He will talk on 
"Some Applications of Ringed Space Theory to 
Several Complex Variables." The talk will be pre- 
ceded by coffee and tea at 3 :30 p.m. in Room 138 
Physics Building. 



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FOREST ECOLOGY SEMINAR 
On Tuesday, October 22nd, Dr. Benee F. Swindel, 
statistician at the Research Triangle Forest Science 
Laboratory, will present a talk on ' ' The Evolution of 
Experimental Philosophy — A Statistical Discussion." 
The seminar will be held at 4:00 p.m. in Room 130 
Biological Sciences Building. 



COUNCIL ON AGING AND HUMAN 
DEVELOPMENT 
The Duke University Council on Aging and Hu- 
man Development will present Dr. Peter H. Klopfer, 
Professor of Zoology and Director of the Field Sta- 
tion for Animal Behavior at Duke University, in an 
open seminar on Tuesday, October 22nd at 4 :00 p.m. 
The seminar will be held in Room 1504 Gerontology 
Building, Duke Hospital. The topic is "The Cosmic 
Deathwish: Evolutionary Origins of Mortality." 



ARTS AND CRAFTS WORKSHOP 
The Art Department, through a grant from the 
Mary Duke Biddle Foundation, will once again spon- 
sor the Arts and Crafts Workshop. This semester the 
workshop will focus on painting with special emphasis 
on acrylic and watercolor techniques. The workshop 
format will be similar to last spring's workshops, one 
evening a week being devoted to an instructional pe- 
riod and the other evenings to open studio sessions. 

On Tuesday, October 22nd, from 7:00-8:30 p.m. 
in the basement of the Ark, Mr. Frank Creech will 
demonstrate the use of acrylic paints. Mr. Creech, a 
graduate of Duke University and Florida State Uni- 
versity, is an exhibiting artist and teacher at Gaston 
College. 

The painting workshops will run for a total of 
eight weeks and will include three sessions of paint- 
ing critique given by leading local artists. The entire 
Duke University community — students, faculty, and 
staff — is invited to participate. 



S.U. DUPLICATE BRIDGE CLUB 
MEETING 
The second evening of duplicate bridge will be at 
7 :00 p.m. on Wednesday, October 23rd, in the Green 
Room East Duke Building. All are invited. 



ACADEMIC COUNCIL MEETING 
The Academic Council will meet on Thursday, 
October 24th, at 4:00 p.m. in Room 208 Flowers 
Building. 



CHEMISTRY STAFF SEMINAR 
Professor Julian M. Sturtevant, Professor of 
Chemistry and Molecular Biophysics at Yale Univer- 
sity, will speak at the Chemistry Staff Seminar on 
Friday, October 25th at 3 :00 p.m. in Room 130 Psy- 
chology-Sociology Building. 



The subject of Professor Sturtevant's address will 
be "The Thermodynamics of the Interaction of the 
S-Peptide and S-Protein of Ribonuclease-S. ' ' All in- 
terested persons are cordially invited to attend. 



PHI BETA KAPPA FALL ELECTIONS 
The fall meeting of the Duke Chapter of Phi Beta 
Kappa will be held on Friday, October 25th, at 4 :00 
p.m. in Room 208 Flowers Building. Undergraduate 
elections will be the main business ; the annual Treas- 
urer 's Report will also be presented. All staff and 
faculty members of the Society are eligible to vote. 
Those not on the roll should notify the Secretary, 
Professor W. F. Stinespring, 113 Divinity School, in 
writing, stating where elected and date of election. 



S.U. SEMINAR ON "CURLEW RIVER" 
PROFESSOR IAIN HAMILTON 
Iain Hamilton, composer in residence and Mary 
Duke Professor, Department of Music, will conduct 
an open seminar in Room 208 Flowers Building at 
7 :00 p.m. immediately preceding the performance of 
"Curlew River." All those attending the musical 
drama are invited to hear Professor Hamilton and 
thereby increase their enjoyment of the performance. 



DUKE UNIVERSITY FACULTY CLUB 
A special meeting of the membership of the Duke 
University Faculty Club will be held on Friday, Oc- 
tober 25th, at 8 :00 p.m. in the basement of the Teer 
House, 4019 Roxboro Road. The purpose of the meet- 
ing is to fill a vacancy in the presidency and to con- 
sider proposed changes in the Bylaws. The meeting 
will be followed at 8 :30 p.m. by a dance. 



FACULTY CLUB DANCE 
The Duke Faculty Club will hold its first Fall 
dance on Friday, October 25th at 8 :30 p.m. at the 
Teer House. Live music will be provided by Jim 
Gregory's Combo. Door prizes will be drawn at 11 :00 
p.m. with all paid members eligible. Guests are more 
than welcome. Admission will be $2.50 per couple. 
Please make reservations by Wednesday, October 
23rd by calling one of the following people: 

Mrs. F. Hodge O'Neal 489-2582 

Mrs. John McKinney 489-9495 

Mrs. John LeBar 286-3982 

Mrs. Hans Hillerbrand 489-9648 

Mrs. Madison Spach 489-2452 

Mrs. Norma Clements 477-8867 



N. Y. LITTLE ORCHESTRA SOCIETY 
PRESENTS CHAPEL PERFORMANCE 
BRITTEN'S "CURLEW RIVER" 
Benjamin Britten's "Curlew River," a uniquely 
moving musical drama, will be presented in the Duke 
University Chapel on Friday, October 25th at 8:15 
p.m. by the Little Orchestra Society of New York, 
Thomas Scherman, Music Director. Brought to the 
campus by the Student Union Performing Arts Com- 
mittee and by the Special Observances Committee of 



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the Duke University Religious Council, the perfor- 
mance will be similar in presentation to last year's 
Pro Musica performance of the "Play of Daniel." 
Tickets, priced at $3.00, $2.50, and $2.00 (all seats 
reserved) are available in the Page Box Office. Mail 
orders may be sent to Box KM, including check (pay- 
able to Duke University Student Union) and self 
addressed, stamped envelope for ticket returns. 

Styled after the English medieval religious drama, 
the work is based on the ancient Japanese Noh-play, 
' ' Sumidagawa. ' ' It has been transplanted by Britten 
and his collaborator, William Plomer, to Curlew River 
and a church in the Fens. The story itself is a moving 
tale of a distraught mother in search of her lost child. 
The English libretto unfolds like a morality play and 
is all the more compelling for the stark economy of its 
movement and aetion. 

Thomas Scherman, who has presented distin- 
guished performances in New York of such operas as 
"Die Frau Ohne Schatten," "Castor and Pollux." 
"Ariadne auf Naxos" and "William Tell," has ral- 
lied the first desk players of The Little Orchestra 
Society to assemble a fine group of musicians for the 
touring company of "Curlew River." The comple- 
ment includes five vocal soloists, drawn from the lead- 
ing American opera companies, plus a male chorus. 



ADVANCE NOTICE 
FORTRAN PROGRAMMING COURSE 
The Computation Center is offering an eight week 
course in FORTRAN programming this fall. The 
course is open to anyone and no previous experience 
with a computer is necessary. Classes start Tuesday, 
October 29th and will meet every Tuesday and Thurs- 
day from 4:00-5:00 p.m. Persons may sign up by 
calling the Computation Center, Extension 4009. 



GUEST CARILLON RECITAL 
MILFORD MTHRE 

A carillon recital will be presented by the distin- 
guished carillonneur, Mr. Milford Myhre, who, on 
January 1st of this year assumed the position of re- 
citalist at Bok Singing Tower, Lake Wales, Florida. 
This post was held by the late Anton Brees, who had 
for some thirty-five summers held the post of Caril- 
lonneur for the Duke University Chapel. The recital 
is scheduled for 3:00 p.m. on Sunday, October 27th. 
Those wishing to hear this one hour concert are ad- 
vised to listen at the far end of the Main Quadrangle. 

Milford Myhre began his study of the instrument 
with Ronald Barnes, Carillonneur at Washington 
(D.C.) Cathedral, and later with the late Staf Nees, 
Director of the Royal Carillon School in Mechelen, 
Belgium. He also studied informally with Percival 
Price at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. 
In 1957 he joined the music faculty at Culver Military 
Academy, Culver, Indiana, where he served for ten 
years as Organist and Carillonneur. He has played 
numerous recitals in North America and Europe and 
was a featured recitalist this Summer at the Seventh 
International Carillon Festival in Springfield, Illi- 



nois, and the National Convention of the American 
Guild of Organists in Denver, Colorado. For sev- 
eral years he has served as Secretary to the Guild 
of Carillonneurs in North America. 
The program follows: 

PRELUDIO NO. 6 for carillon Matthias van den Gheyn 

SARABANDE for guitar Francis Poulenc 

SELECTIONS FROM ANNA MAGDALENA 
BACH'S BOOK 

Etude (1961) Gary White 

Soliloquy (1960) Jean Miller 

Minuet (1952) Ronald Barnes 

The Duke of Argyle (1959) Roy Hamlin Johnson 

Kongai : The Soul of The Great Bell John Diercks 

(c. 1960) 

SONATA, L. 79, for harpsichord Domenico Scarlatti 

ENGLISH FOLKSONGS 

Drink to Me Only With Thine Eyes 
The Jolly Miller of the Dee 

SONATINE II for carillon Sjef van Balkom 

Andante 
Allegretto 
Adagio 
Allegro- Andante 



GANDHI CENTENARY CELEBRATIONS 
ESSAY COMPETITION 

The Sub-Committee formed in India for the cele- 
bration of the Gandhi Centenary abroad will conduct 
an Essay Competition during the Centenary celebra- 
tions. 

The subject of the Essay is: GANDHIJI AND 
THE EMANCIPATION OF MAN. The Competition 
is open only to foreign nationals and not to Indians. 
Terms and conditions for tlie Competition are given 
below : 

(a) Two prizes will be awarded to students and two to the 
general public on a worldwide basis in each of the five 
languages mentioned below in (c). For this purpose, 
the term students will be defined as bona fide students 
of any educational institution in the age group 16-24. 
Those above 24, whether students or not, will be treated 
as members of the general public. 

(b) One economy class return air fare for a month's trip 
to India in October 1969 will be offered as a prize. The 
entire expenditure during stay and travel in India will 
be met by the Sub-Committee for the Celebration of the 
Gandhi Centenary Abroad. 

(c) The essay will be written in English, French, Spanish, 
Russian, or Arabic. 

(d) The length of the essay should not exceed 8,000 words. 

(e) The last date for receipt of entries is January 31, 1969. 

(f) Names of prize winners will be announced on August 
15, 1969. 

Competitors in the U.S.A. may kindly send their 
entries, in triplicate, in a sealed cover to Miss K. Nair, 
First Secretary (Education), Embassy of India, 2107 
Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Washington, D.C. 
20008, who will forward them on receipt to the Sec- 
retary. Sub-Committee for Celebration of the Gandhi 
Centenary Abroad, in New Delhi. 



IMPORTANT— Notices for the Duke University Calendar should be submitted 

IN WRITTEN FORM to Room 207 Flowers Building, West Campus not later 

than 5:00 p.m., Tuesday. Extension 2911. 



Duke University 

HAT FMHAR ":. 



\ ! 




Oct. 27-Nov. 3, 1968 



Sunday, October 27 

10:20 a.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Chal- 
lenges in Education." WCHL Chapel Hill. 
Dr. Everett H. Ellinwood, Jr. will discuss 
"Amphetamine Intoxication." 
10:30-10:45 a.m. Carillon Recital. Mr. J. Samuel 

Hammond, University Carillonneur. 
11 :00 a.m. University Service of Worship. Univer- 
sity Chapel. Preacher: The Reverend Profes- 
sor Thomas A. Langford, Chairman of the De- 
partment of Religion. Sermon: "Solitude, So- 
ciety, and Students." Broadcast over Radio 
Station WDNC and WDNC-FM. 

3:00 p.m. Guest Carillon Recital: Mr. Milford 
Myhre, Carillonneur, Bok Tower. 

4:00-6:00 p.m. International Open House. 2022 
Campus Drive. 

7 :00 and 9 :00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page Au- 
ditorium. "IN THE HEAT OP THE NIGHT" 
with Rod Steiger and Sidney Poitier. "Mod- 
ern classic in genre of movie detective stories 
. . . stunning example of how to weave sus- 
pense, character, tension, and action into con- 
temporary situation. In this case, a murder 
in the deep South touches off the sparks. En- 
joyable, brittle acting." — Cue. In color. 

8:30 p.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Chal- 
lenges in Education." WPTP Raleigh. Mr. 
James Boughton will discuss "A Model of the 
Banking System. ' ' 



Monday, October 28 

9:30-11:00 a.m. WSGA Lounge Open. Lobby, East 
Campus Union. 

2 :00 p.m. Registration for Divinity School Convo- 
cation, North Carolina Pastors' School, and 
James A. Gray Lectures. Flowers Lounge, 
(see special notice). 

3:30 p.m. The final examination of Mr. John Paul 
Jones for the Ph.D. degree in Political Science. 
Room 302 Perkins Library. 

4 :00 p.m. The Bishop 's Hour : Bishop William Rags- 
dale Cannon. Page Auditorium. 

4:15 p.m. Zoology Seminar. Room 111 Biological I 



Sciences Building. Speaker: Per F. Scholan- 
der. 
4:15-5:30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. 

7 :00-8 :30 p.m. Art Workshop : Painting with acryl- 

ics. Basement, The Ark. Open to faculty, staff 
members, and students. 
7 :30 p.m. First Gray Lecture : Dr. Samuel Sand- 
mel. Page Auditorium. 

8 :45 p.m. First Convocation Sermon : Dr. Dow Kirk- 

patrick. University Chapel. 



Tuesday, October 29 

9:00 a.m. Pastors' School Lecture: Bishop Roy C. 
Nichols. Page Auditorium. 

9:30-11:00 a.m. WSGA Lounge Open. Lobby, East 

Campus Union. 
10:15 a.m. Second Gray Lecture: Dr. Samuel Sand- 

mel. Page Auditorium. 
10 :30 a.m. South Asia Lecture : Dr. Suzanne Ru- 
dolph. Room 139 Social Science Building. 
11 :45 a.m. Alumni Lecture : Dr. Joel A. Cooper. 
Page Auditorium. 

4 :00-5 :00 p.m. Fortran Programming Course. Com- 
putation Center. 

4:00 p.m. Forest Ecology Seminar. Room 130 Bio- 
logical Sciences Building. Speaker : Mr. Charles 
K. McClure. 

4 :15-5 :30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for wom- 
en : faculty, staff members, and students. 

7 :30 p.m. Third Gray Lecture : Dr. Samuel Sand- 
mel. Page Auditorium. 

7 :30-10 :00 p.m. Scottish Country Dancing. Presby- 
terian Student Center. 

8 :45 p.m. Second Convocation Sermon : Dr. Dow 
Kirkpatrick. University Chapel. 



Wednesday, October 30 

9:00 a.m. Pastors' School Lecture: Bishop Roy C. 

Nichols. Page Auditorium. 
9 :30-ll :00 a.m. WSGA Lounge Open. Lobby, East 

Campus Union. 
10:15 a.m. Fourth Gray Lecture: Dr. Samuel Sand- 

mel. Page Auditorium. 



11:30 a.m. Third Convocation Sermon: Dr. Dow 
Kirkpatrick. University Chapel. 

4:00 p.m. Psychology Colloquium. Karl Zener Au- 
ditorium, Psychology Building. Speaker: Dr. 
Jasper Brener. 

4:00 p.m. Mathematics Colloquium. Room 114 
Physics Building. Speaker: Dr. Jerome Keis- 
ler. 

4:15-5:30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. 

7 :00-8 :30 p.m. Chapel Choir Rehearsal. University 
Chapel. 

7 :00-9 :00 p.m. Open House Badminton for all men 
and women : faculty and students. East Cam- 
pus Gymnasium. 



Thursday, October 31 

9 :30-ll :00 a.m. WSGA Lounge Open. Lobby, East 
Campus Union. 
10:00 a.m. Divinity School Chapel Service. Univer- 
sity Chapel. Service of Worship by Pine Arts 
Committee. 

4 :00-5 :00 p.m. Fortran Programming Course. Com- 
putation Center. 

4 :15-5 :30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women : 
faculty, staff members, and students. 

5:00 p.m. Dean's Hour: Dr. Willoughby Lathem. 
Hospital Amphitheater. 

5:15 p.m. Faculty Volleyball. Card Gymnasium. 

8:15 p.m. American Musicological Society: Pro- 
fessor Friedrich Blume. Music Room (201) 
East Duke Building. 

8 :15-9 :30 p.m. West Campus Swimming Pool open 
to faculty members and their families. Fac- 
ulty children will be admitted only when ac- 
companied by their parents. 



Friday, November 1 

9 :30-ll :00 a.m. WSGA Lounge Open. Lobby, East 
Campus Union. 
10:00 a.m. Divinity School Chapel Service. Univer- 
sity Chapel. Service of Worship by the Junior 
Class. 
12:30 p.m. Plant Ecology Seminar. Room 144 Bio- 
logical Sciences Building. Speaker: Mr. Phil 
Rundel. 

3 :30 p.m. Chemistry Staff Seminar. Room 130 Psy- 
chology-Sociology Building. Speaker : Dr. Rob- 
ert A. Culp, Jr. 

4 :15-5 :30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women : 
faculty, staff members, and students. Faculty 
daughters, ages 6 to 16, may also swim; those 
10 and under must be accompanied by their 
mothers. 

8:00 p.m. S.U. Cinematic Arts Film Series. 
Auditorium. Biological Sciences Building. 
"TOUCH OF EVIL" starring Orson Welles, 
Charlton Heston, Janet Leigh, Marlene Diet- 
rich. An emotional, highly-charged drama 
about police brutality and corrupt tactics in 



a Mexican border town that pulls no punches. 
Welles directs himself as the chief of police 
with a success that makes Rod Steiger's (Heat 
of the Night) resemble an amateur. And 
Welles' cinematic technique lives up to all ex- 
pectations. Welles is again a master of sound 
montage, original camera angles, exploration 
of the depths of black and white. 95 Minutes. 

8 :15 p.m. DURC Open Lecture : Sir Alister Hardy. 
Union Ballroom. 

8:15 p.m. Trinity College Historical Society Meet- 
ing. Room 208 Flowers Building. Speaker: 
Professor Robert G. L. Waite. 



Saturday, November 2 

9:55 a.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Chal- 
lenges in Education." WDNC Durham. Dr. 
Everett H. Ellinwood, Jr. will discuss "Am- 
phetamine Intoxication." 

3:00-5:00 p.m. East Campus Gymnasium: Open to 
students, faculty, and staff for recreation 
(swimming, badminton, volleyball, basketball, 
table tennis). 

7 :00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page Auditorium. 
(Note: One Showing Only). "DR. ZHIVA- 
GO" Winner of six academy awards — includ- 
ing best screenplay, best cinematography and 
best music score. With Omar Sharif, Julie 
Christy, Tom Courtenay, Rod Steiger, Geral- 
dine Chaplin, Alec Guinness, Ralph Richard- 
son, Rita Tushingham. Directed by David 
Lean. "A whole social system is torn down 
and another of a harsh, dynamic nature is 
constructed to take its place . . . sharply il- 
lustrated under the skillful direction of David 
Lean. But the much greater part ... is giv- 
en .. . particularly ... to the . . . passion- 
ate love affair between the gentle, courtly Dr. 
Zhivago and Lara . . . The decor and color 
photography are as brilliant, tasteful and ex- 
quisite as any ever put on the screen." — Bosley 
Crowther, New York Times. In color. 



Sunday, November 3 

10:20 a.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Chal- 
lenges in Education." WCHL Chapel Hill. 
Dr. D. R, Fowler will discuss "The Alcoholic 
as a Patient." 

10:30-10:45 a.m. Carillon Recital. Mr. J. Samuel 
Hammond, University Carillonneur. 

11 :00 a.m. University Service of Worship. Univer- 
sity Chapel. Preacher: Bishop Roy D. Nich- 
ols, Member, Central Committee, World Coun- 
cil of Churches, and Presiding Bishop, Pitts- 
burg Area. United Methodist Church. Broad- 
cast over Radio Station WDNC and WDNC- 
FM. 
1 :00 p.m.-l :00 a.m. Pre-Symposium Film Program. 
Auditorium, Biological Sciences Building. 



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4:00-6:00 p.m. International Open House. 2022 
Campus Drive. 

7:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page Auditorium. 
(Note: One Showing Only). "DR. ZHIVA- 
GO" Winner of six academy awards — includ- 
ing best screenplay, best cinematography and 
best music score. With Omar Sharif, Julie 
Christy, Tom Courtenay, Rod Steiger, Geral- 
dine Chaplin, Alec Guinness, Ralph Richard- 
son, Rita Tushingham. Directed by David 
Lean. ' ' A whole social system is torn down and 
another of a harsh, dynamic nature is con- 
structed to take its place . . . sharply illus- 
trated under the skillful direction of David 
Lean. But the much greater part ... is given 
. . . particularly ... to the . . . passionate love 
affair between the gentle, courtly Dr. Zhivago 
and Lara . . . The decor and color photography 
are as brilliant, tasteful and exquisite as any 
ever put on the screen." — Bosley Crowther, 
New York Times. In color. 

8:00 p.m. UCM Lecture: "The Crisis in Czechoslo- 
vakia Today." Baldwin Auditorium. 

8:30 p.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Chal- 
lenges in Education." WPTF Raleigh. Dr. 
Vladimir Treml will discuss "The Soviet Econ- 
omy." 



RELIGIOUS GROUP ANNOUNCEMENTS 
Episcopal (UCM) : Thursday, October 31st, 5 :15 
p.m. Holy Communion. Sunday, November 3rd, 8 :00 
a.m. Holy Communion ; 9 :15 a.m. Choral Eucharist 
and sermon. 

UCM Gathered Community: Sunday, October 
27th, 5:30 p.m. at the Presbyterian (UCM) Center on 
Alexander Avenue, the gathered communities of the 
University Christian Movement and other interested 
persons are invited to come together for a common 
meal and worship. The worship meditation will be 
given by the Reverend Dr. Henry Clark who will 
share his concerns about the need for community and 
mission in the church on campus. 

Unitarian- UNrvERSALiST Fellowship: The Uni- 
tarian-Universalist Fellowship of Durham and Chapel 
Hill meets at the Allied Arts Building (Proctor and 
Viekers Streets) on Sunday mornings at 10:30 a.m. 
On Sunday, October 27th, Professor Henry Clark of 
the Department of Religion will speak on the subject, 
"Ethics and Modern Technology." On Sunday, No- 
vember 3rd, the speaker will be Nathan Garrett of 
the Community Development Corporation. 



UNIVERSITY SERVICE OF WORSHIP 
The Reverend Professor Thomas A. Langford, 
Chairman of the Department of Religion, will de- 
liver the sermon at the University Service of Wor- 
ship on Sunday, October 27th, at 11 :00 a.m. Dr. 
Langford will preach on ' ' Solitude, Society, and Stu- 
dents." 



GUEST CARILLON RECITAL 
MILFORD MYIIRE 

A carillon recital will be presented by the distin- 
guished carillonneur, Mr. Milford Myhre, who, on 
January 1st of this year assumed the position of re- 
citalist at Bok Singing Tower, Lake Wales, Florida. 
This post was held by the late Anton Brees, who had 
for some thirty-five summers held the post of Caril- 
lonneur for the Duke University Chapel. The recital 
is scheduled for 3:00 p.m. on Sunday, October 27th. 
Those wishing to hear this one hour concert are ad- 
vised to listen at the far end of the Main Quadrangle. 

Milford Myhre began his study of the instrument 
with Ronald Barnes, Carillonneur at Washington 
(D.C.) Cathedral, and later with the late Staf Nees, 
Director of the Royal Carillon School in Mechelen, 
Belgium. He also studied informally with Percival 
Price at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. 
In 1957 he joined the music faculty at Culver Military 
Academy, Culver, Indiana, where he served for ten 
years as Organist and Carillonneur. He has played 
numerous recitals in North America and Europe and 
was a featured recitalist this Summer at the Seventh 
International Carillon Festival in Springfield, Illi- 
nois, and the National Convention of the American 
Guild of Organists in Denver, Colorado. For sev- 
eral years he has served as Secretary to the Guild 
of Carillonneurs in North America. 

The program follows : 

PRELUDIO NO. 6 for carillon Matthias van den Gheyn 

SARABANDE for guitar Francis Poulenc 

SELECTIONS FROM ANNA MAGDALENA 
BACH'S BOOK 

Etude (1961) Gary White 

Soliloquy (1960) Jean Miller 

Minuet ( 1952) Ronald Barnes 

The Duke of Argyle (1959) Roy Hamlin Johnson 

Kongai : The Soul of The Great Bell John Diercks 

(c. 1960) 

SONATA, L. 79, for harpsichord Domenico Scarlatti 

ENGLISH FOLKSONGS 

Drink to Me Only With Thine Eyes 
The Jolly Miller of the Dee 

SONATINE II for carillon Sjef van Balkom 

Andante 
Allegretto 
Adagio 
Allegro- Andante 



DIVINITY SCHOOL CONVOCATION 
NORTH CAROLINA PASTORS' SCHOOL 

JAMES A. GRAY LECTURES 
The Divinity School Convocation, North Carolina 
Pastors' School, together with the James A. Gray 
Lectures will be held Monday, October 28th through 
Wednesday, October 30th. Sponsored by the Divinity 
School of Duke University, the North Carolina Pas- 
tors' School, and the Department of Ministerial Edu- 
cation of the United Methodist Church, all sessions 
will take place on West Campus. 

The James A. Gray Lecturer will be Dr. Samuel 
Sandmel, Distinguished Service Professor of Bible 



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and Hellenistic Literature, Hebrew Union College- 
Jewish Institute of Religion, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

The Convocation Preacher will be Dr. Dow Kirk- 
patrick, Minister, First United Methodist Church, 
Evanston, Illinois. The Pastors' School Lecturer on 
the Ministry will be Bishop Roy C. Nichols, Pitts- 
burgh Area, the United Methodist Church. The Bish- 
op 's Hour Lecturer will be Bishop "William Ragsdale 
Cannon, Raleigh Area, The United Methodist Church. 
The Ninth Annual Alumni Lecturer will be Dr. Joel 
A. Cooper, Minister, Central United Methodist 
Church, Payetteville, Arkansas. 

Leaders for the "Introductory Seminars" will in- 
clude Dr. Kenneth W. Clark, on "New Testament 
Manuscripts at Duke ' ' ; The Reverend Julius H. Cor- 
pening, with the Reverend Philip R. Cousin and 
Bishop Roy C. Nichols, on "The Urban Crisis"; and 
Dr. Frederick L. Herzog on ' ' Political Theology. ' ' 

The public is invited to any and all of the events 
listed in the following schedule. 

Monday, October 28 

2 :00 p.m. — Registration, Flowers Building Lounge. 

4.00 p.m. — The Bishop's Hour. Bishop Cannon. Page Au- 
ditorium. 

7:30 p.m. — First Gray Lecture. Dr. Sandmel. Page Audi- 
torium. 

8:45 p.m. — First Convocation Sermon. Dr. Kirkpatrick. Uni- 
versity Chapel. 

Tuesday, October 29 
9:00 a.m.— Pastors' School Lecture. Bishop Nichols. Page 

Auditorium. 
10:15 a.m.— Second Gray Lecture. Dr. Sandmel. Page Audi- 
torium. 
11 :45 a.m. — Alumni Lecture. Dr. Cooper. Page Auditorium. 

3 :30 p.m. — Introductory Seminars. 

Professor Clark — Rare Book Room 

Professor Herzog — 201 Divinity 

Bishop Nichols, The Reverend Mr. Corpening, 

The Reverend Mr. Cousin — 208 Flowers. 

7:30 p.m.— Third Gray Lecture. Dr. Sandmel. Page Audi- 
torium. 

8:45 p.m.— Second Convocation Sermon. Dr. Kirkpatrick. 
University Chapel. 

Wednesday, October 30 

9:00 a.m.— Pastors' _ School Lecture. Bishop Nichols. Page 

Auditorium. 
10:15 a.m.— Fourth Gray Lecture. Dr. Sandmel. Page Audi- 
torium. 
11:30 a.m. — Third Convocation Sermon. Dr. Kirkpatrick. Uni- 
versity Chapel. 

The Speakers and Their Topics 
The Bishop's Hour— Bishop William Ragsdale Cannon 
The Ninth Annual Alumni Lecture— The Reverend Doctor 

Joel A. Cooper— "Ordained to Word, Sacrament, and Order." 
The James A. Gray Lectures— Professor Samuel Sandmel on 

"The Several Israels." 

I— "The Hebrew Israel" 
II — "The Christian Israel" 
III— "The Modern State of Israel" 
IV— "Israel in the 20th Century" 

The Convocation Sermons— The Reverend Doctor Dow Kirk- 
patrick 

I— "New Ears for the New Era" 
II — "The Voice of ... no Poetry" 
III— "Our Wild Hope, Who Shall Scorn?" 



The Special Pastors' School Lectures on "The Ministry Today" 
— Bishop Roy C. Nichols 

Three Introductory Seminars : 
Dr. Kenneth W. Clark, on "New Testament Manuscripts 

at Duke" 

Dr. Frederick Herzog, on "Political Theology" 

Bishop Roy Nichols, the Reverend Julius H. Corpening, the 

Reverend Philip R. Cousin, on "The Urban Crisis" 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. John Paul Jones for 
the Ph.D. degree in Political Science will be held on 
Monday, October 28th at 3 :30 in Room 302 Perkins 
Library. The subject of Mr. Jones' dissertation is 
"A Comparative Analysis Of Theories Of Religion 
Aud Politics As Applied To Relevant Decisions Of 
The United States Supreme Court." 

The committee to conduct the examination con- 
sists of Professors Robert S. Rankin, John H. Hallo- 
well, Allan Kornberg and Harold T. Parker. Profes- 
sor Rankin will preside. 



ZOOLOGY SEMINAR 

The Department of Zoology will hold its weekly 
seminar on Monday, October 28th, at 4:15 p.m. in 
Room 111 Biological Sciences Building. Per F. Scho- 
lander of Scripps Institution, University of Califor- 
nia at San Diego, will speak on "Imbibition, Osmosis 
and Negative Pressure." 

Coffee and tea will be served in the foyer at 4:00 
p.m. 



ARTS AND CRAFTS WORKSHOP 
The Arts and Crafts Workshop continues this 
week with instruction in painting. On Monday, 
October 28th, from 7:00-8:30 p.m. in the basement 
of the Ark, there will be instruction in acrylic tech- 
niques. On the other weekday evenings from 6 :00- 
8:00 p.m., the Ark will be open for independent 
studio sessions. Instruction in the painting workshop 
will be on an individual basis ; beginning or advanced 
painters are equally welcome. 

The entire painting workshop series will run for 
a total of eight weeks. The Arts and Crafts Work- 
shops are open to all members of the Duke Commu- 
nity: students, faculty, and staff. 



SOUTH ASIA LECTURE 
Dr. Suzanne Rudolph of the Political Science De- 
partment of the University of Chicago will lecture 
on "The Political System of Ancient India" in the 
morning class of the Interdisciplinary Course in 
South Asian Civilization on Tuesday, October 29th. 
The lecture will be held in Room 139 Social Science 
Building at 10:30 a.m. and visitors are invited. Dr. 
Rudolph is an authority on the political institutions 
of modern India. 



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FORTRAN PROGRAMMING COURSE 
The Computation Center is offering an eight week 
course in FORTRAN programming this fall. The 
course is open to anyone and no previous experience 
with a computer is necessary. Classes start Tuesday, 
October 29th and will meet every Tuesday and Thurs- 
day from 4 :00-5 :00 p.m. Persons may sign up by 
calling the Computation Center, Extension 4009. 



FOREST ECOLOGY SEMINAR 
On Tuesday, October 29th, Mr. Charles K. Mc- 
Clure, a student in the School of Forestry, will pre- 
sent a talk on "Summer Life Between 10° — 40°e 
Longitude and 70° — 47°n Latitude." The seminar 
will be held at 4 :00 p.m. in Room 130 Biological Sci- 
ences Building. 



PSYCHOLOGY COLLOQUIUM 
The Department of Psychology will hold a collo- 
quium on Wednesday, October 30th, in the Karl Zener 
Memorial Auditorium, Psychology Building, at 4:00 
p.m. Dr. Jasper Brener from the University of Ten- 
nessee will speak on "Instrumental Conditioning of 
Visceral Responses." 



MATHEMATICS COLLOQUIUM 
The Mathematics Colloquium will meet on Wednes- 
day, October 30th, at 4 :00 p.m. in Room 114 Physics 
Building. The speaker will be Dr. Jerome Keisler of 
the University of Wisconsin. The talk will be pre- 
ceded by coffee and tea at 3:30 p.m. in Room 138 
Physics Building. 



DEAN'S HOUR 
The Dean's Hour will be held on Thursday, Oc- 
tober 31st, at 5 :00 p.m. in the Hospital Amphitheater. 
Dr. Willoughby Lathem, Deputy Director of Medical 
and Natural Sciences from the Rockefeller Founda- 
tion, will speak on "The International Challenge of 
Medicine." 



AMERICAN MUSICOLOGICAL SOCIETY 
GUEST LECTURER FRIEDRICH BLUME 
Professor Friedrich Blume, distinguished music 
historian and authority on seventeenth and eighteenth 
century music, will lecture on "The Present State of 
Bach Research" upon invitation from the American 
Musicological Society on Thursday, October 31st, at 
8:15 p.m. in the Music Room, East Duke Building. 
The lecture is sponsored jointly by the Music De- 
partments of the University of North Carolina at 
Chapel Hill and of Duke University. 

As a professor for music history at the universi- 
ties of Berlin and Kiel, Blume has had a tremendous 
influence on music historiography and its professional 
organization for two generations. His studies on 
protestant church music, on Praetorius, Sehutz, Bux- 
tehude, Bach, and Mozart are fundamental. Through 
his vision and under his editorship monumental proj- 



ects of lexicographical and bibliographical nature 
have been realized, with the cooperation of scholars 
in over fifty countries. Blume has been president of 
the German Musicological Society from 1947 to 1962 
(he is now honorary president), president of the In- 
ternational Musicological Society from 1958 to 1961, 
president of the Joseph Haydn Institute since 1955, 
founder of research commissions, and has led national 
and international conventions. He has been honored 
with the Goethe medal by his native state Hesse, and 
with the order of merit of the first class by the Federal 
Republic of Germany. The International Dolmetsch 
Foundation, Haslemere, Surrey, in 1963 elected him 
governor. In 1968, at 75 years of age, he became a 
member of the Royal Danish Academy of Arts and 
Sciences. 

Professor Blume is presently visiting this conti- 
nent on a Fullbright Fellowship, giving lectures at 
Princeton, Columbia, the City University of New 
York, Cornell, the University of Toronto, and Duke 
University. The public is invited to hear this emi- 
nently gifted speaker. 



PLANT ECOLOGY SEMINAR 
Phil Rundel, graduate student in botany, will in- 
troduce the topic "Historical Trends in Plant Ecol- 
ogy Research in the United States" at the Plant 
Ecology Seminar which will be held on Friday, No- 
vember 1st, at 12:30 p.m. in Room 144 Biological 
Sciences Building. 



CHEMISTRY STAFF SEMINAR 
Dr. Robert A. Culp, Jr., visiting Assistant Pro- 
fessor in the Department of Chemistry, will speak at 
the Chemistry Staff Seminar on Friday, November 
1st, at 3 :30 p.m. in Room 130 Psychology-Sociology 
Building. The subject of Dr. Culp's address will be 
"A Tracer Method for the Study of Electrode Re- 
actions." All interested persons are cordially in- 
vited to attend. 



DURC OPEN LECTURE 
SIR ALISTER HARDY 

Sir Alister Hardy, one of the world's most dis- 
tinguished zoologists, will speak twice at Duke Uni- 
versity on Friday, November 1st. Honorary Fellow 
of Merton College, Oxford University, Sir Alister 
delivered the famed Gifford Lectures, University of 
Aberdeen, 1963-65, and they were published in two 
volumes, The Living Stream and The Divine Flame. 

Under sponsorship of the Special Observances 
Committee of the Duke University Religious Council, 
Sir Alister will give a lecture on "Science and the 
Transcendent" on Friday, November 1st, at 8:15 
p.m. in the Union Ballroom. The public is cordially 
invited to attend without charge. At 4:00 p.m., Sir 
Alister will speak to the Zoology Seminar on the sub- 
ject of Plankton. 

Born at Nottingham, Sir Alister was educated at 
Oundle School and at Exeter College, Oxford Uni- 
versity. He was Christopher Welch Biological Re- 
search Scholar, 1920 ; Assistant Naturalist in the Fish- 



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eries Department of the Ministry of Agriculture and 
Fisheries, 1921-24; Chief Zoologist to the Discovery 
Expedition, 1924-28. He was Professor of Zoology 
and Oceanography, University College, Hull, 1928-42 ; 
he was Regius Professor of Natural History, Univer- 
sity of Aberdeen, 1942-45; Linacre Professor of Zo- 
ology, University of Oxford, 1946-61. 

Sir Alister was awarded the Scientific Medal of 
the Zoological Society, in 1939. He is an Honorary 
Fellow of Exeter College, Oxford and has received 
honorary degrees from both Aberdeen and South- 
hampton Universities. 

In addition to his Gifford Lectures, his other pub- 
lications include: The Open Sea, Part I (The World 
of Plankton), 1956, Part II (The Open Sea), and 
Fish and Fisheries, 1958; Memoirs of Biological 
Oceanography. 



UCM LECTURE 
THE CRISIS IN CZECHOSLOVAKIA TODAY 
Four Czechoslovakians will discuss the recent po- 
litical events in their country at 8:00 p.m., Sunday, 
November 3rd, in Baldwin Auditorium. This group 
has been touring the U.S., participating in a series 
of Christian-Marxist Dialogue Conferences under 
the sponsorship of the Board of Ecumenical Mission 
and Relations of the United Presbyterian Church. 
The members of the team are : Dan Drapal, a student 
of theology in Prague, Julius Tomin, an assistant in 
Marxism in the University of Prague, Lubonim Mire- 
howsky, a Senior in the church with a parish in Ta- 
bor, and Vitezalav, Professor of Marxism at the 
Military Academy in Bino. The public is invited. 



PRE-SYMPOSIUM FILM PROGRAM 
A pre-Symposium program dealing with the his- 
tory of the cinema will be presented on Sunday, No- 
vember 3rd, from 1 :00 p.m.-l :00 a.m. in the Audi- 



torium of the Biological Sciences Building. It will 
be a free, ten-hour program which will include classic 
films by outstanding directors from 1905-1967. A 
listing of the films follows: 

"The Great Train Robbery"— Porter 

"Conquest of the Pole"— Melies 

"The Cops" — Buster Keaton 

"The Andulusian Dog" — Bunuel and Dali 

' ' Arsenal ' ' — Doushenko 

"Citizen Kane"— Welles 

"Bicycle Thief"— de Sica 

"The Golden Coach"— Renoir 

"Knife in the Water "— Polanski 

' ' Castro Street ' '— Baillie 



TRINITY COLLEGE HISTORICAL SOCIETY 
Professor Robert G. L. Waite will address the 
Trinity College Historical Society on Thursday, Oc- 
tober 31st, at 8 :15 p.m. in Room 208 Flowers Build- 
ing. Professor Waite, a former Guggenheim Fellow 
and currently Professor of History at Williams Col- 
lege, is the author of Vanguard of Nazism: The Free 
Corps Movement in Post-War Germany, 1918-1923 
and co-translator of Erich Eyck's A History of the 
Weimar Republic. His topic for the evening will be 
"Psychoanalysis and History: The Case of Adolph 
Hitler." All interested persons are cordially invited 
to attend. Coffee will be available at 8 :00 p.m., prior 
to the address. 



DURHAM THEATRE GUILD 
"BORN YESTERDAY" 

The Durham Theatre Guild will present Garson 
Kanin's play, "Born Yesterday," on November 1st, 
2nd, and 3rd at the Allied Arts Center, 810 West 
Proctor Street, Durham, at 8 :30 p.m. For ticket in- 
formation call Allied Arts, Telephone 682-5519. 



IMPORTANT— Notices for the Duke University Calendar should be submitted 

IN WRITTEN FORM to Room 207 Flowers Building, West Campus not later 

than 5:00 p.m., Tuesday. Extension 2911. 



%ke University 

^ALENDARl. 







Nov. 3-10, 1968 



Sunday, November 3 

10:20 a.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Chal- 
lenges in Education." WCHL Chapel Hill. 
Dr. D. R. Fowler will discuss "The Alcoholic 
as a Patient." 
10:30-10:45 a.m. Carillon Recital. Mr. J. Samuel 

Hammond, University Carillonneur. 
11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship. Univer- 
sity Chapel. Preacher: Bishop Roy D. Nich- 
ols, Member, Central Committee, World Coun- 
cil of Churches, and Presiding Bishop, Pitts- 
burg Area, United Methodist Church. Sermon : 
"Say the Word." Broadcast over Radio Sta- 
tion WDNC and WDNC-PM. 

1 :00 p.m.-l :00 a.m. Pre-Symposium Film Program. 
Auditorium, Biological Sciences Building. 

4:00-6:00 p.m. International Open House. 2022 
Campus Drive. 

7:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page Auditorium. 
(Note: One Showing Only). "DR. ZHIVA- 
GO" Winner of six academy awards — includ- 
ing best screenplay, best cinematography and 
best music score. With Omar Sharif, Julie 
Christy, Tom Courtenay, Rod Steiger, Geral- 
dine Chaplin, Alec Guinness, Ralph Richard- 
son, Rita Tushingham. Directed by David 
Lean. ' ' A whole social system is torn down and 
another of a harsh, dynamic nature is con- 
structed to take its place . . . sharply illus- 
trated under the skillful direction of David 
Lean. But the much greater part ... is given 
. . . particularly ... to the . . . passionate love 
affair between the gentle, courtly Dr. Zhivago 
and Lara . . . The decor and color photography 
are as brilliant, tasteful and exquisite as any 
ever put on the screen."- — Bosley Crowther, 
New York Times. In color. 

8:00 p.m. UCM Lecture: "The Crisis in Czechoslo- 
vakia Today." Baldwin Auditorium. 

8:30 p.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Chal- 
lenges in Education." WPTF Raleigh. Dr. 
Vladimir Treml will discuss ' ' The Soviet Econ- 
omy." 

Monday, November 4 

9 :30-ll :00 a.m. WSGA Lounge Open. Lobby, East 
Campus Union. 



4:15 p.m. Joint Departmental Seminar: Zoology 
and Botany. Room 111 Biological Sciences 
Building. Speaker: Dr. R. P. Levine. 

4:15-5:30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. 

7 :00 p.m. Tocqueville Society Meeting. Room 208 
Flowers Building. Speaker : Mr. Russ Nieli. 

7:00-8:30 p.m. Arts and Crafts Workshop: Paint- 
ing Critique by Robert Barnard. Basement 
of The Ark. 

8 :00 p.m. Duke-UNC Cooperative Program in Rus- 
sian and East European Studies. Room 136 
Social Science Building. Speaker : Dr. Oldrych 
Kyn. 



Tuesday, November 5 

9 :30-ll :00 a.m. WSGA Lounge Open. Lobby, East 
Campus Union. 
10:00 a.m. Divinity School Chapel Service. York 

Chapel. Speaker: Bishop Roy C. Nichols. 
12 :50-l :40 p.m. Engineering Guest Speaker Program. 
Engineering Auditorium, Room 125 Engineer- 
ing Building. Speaker: Dr. John E. Gibson. 

4 :00-5 :00 p.m. Fortran Programming Course. 
Computation Center. 

4:00 p.m. Forest Ecology Seminar. Room 130 Bio- 
logical Sciences Building. Speaker: Mr. 
Vaughn Hofeldt. 

4:15-5:30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for wom- 
en : faculty, staff members, and students. 

7 :30-10 :00 p.m. Scottish Country Dancing. Presby- 
terian Student Center. 

7:30 p.m. Faculty Club Election Eve Party. Teer 
House, Roxboro Road. 

8:15 p.m. Art Department Lecture: Dr. Erwin 
Walter Palm. Room 139 Social Science Build- 
ing. 

8:30 p.m. YM-YWCA Election Discussion. Room 
208 Flowers Building. 



Wednesday, November 6 

9 :30-ll :00 a.m. WSGA Lounge Open. Lobby, East 
Campus Union. 



10:00 a.m. Divinity School Chapel Service. York 
Chapel. Speaker: Bishop Roy C. Nichols. 

4:00 p.m. Psychology Colloquium. Room 130 Psy- 
chology-Sociology Building. Speaker : Dr. Don- 
ald Adams. 

4:15-5:30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. 

7:00 p.m. Duplicate Bridge Club Meeting. Green 
Room, East Duke Building. 

7:00-8:30 p.m. Chapel Choir Rehearsal. University 
Chapel. 

7 :00-9 :00 p.m. Open House Badminton for all men 
and women: faculty and students. East Cam- 
pus Gymnasium. 

8 :00 p.m. Duke — Durham Open Discussion : Black 
Solidarity Committee Boycott. Music Room, 
East Duke Building. 



Thursday, November 7 

9 :30-ll :00 a.m. WSGA Lounge Open. Lobby, East 
Campus Union. 
10 :00 a.m. Divinity School Chapel Service. York 
Chapel. Speaker: Bishop Roy C. Nichols. 

4 :00-5 :00 p.m. Fortran Program m ing Course. Com- 
putation Center. 

4 :15-5 :30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women : 
faculty, staff members, and students. 

5 :15 p.m. Faculty Volleyball. Card Gymnasium. 

8:15-9:30 p.m. "West Campus Swimming Pool open 
to faculty members and their families. Fac- 
ulty children will be admitted only when ac- 
companied by their parents. 



Friday, November 8 

9 :30-ll :00 a.m. WSGA Lounge Open. Lobby, East 
Campus Union. 
10:00 a.m. Divinity School Chapel Service. York 

Chapel. 
11 :00 a.m. Duke Law Forum. Law School Court- 
room. Speaker: Mr. Arlen Specter. 

1:00-5:30 p.m. Registration for Dad's Day Week- 
end. Flowers Lounge. (See Special Notice) 

3:30 p.m. Chemistry Staff Seminar. Room 130 
Psychology-Sociology Building. Speaker: Dr. 
Frederick D. Greene. 

4 :15-5 :30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women : 
faculty, staff members, and students. Faculty 
daughters, ages 6 to 16, may also swim; those 
10 and under must be accompanied by their 
mothers. 

5 :40-8 :00 p.m. Sorority Parties. Carr Building. 

7 :00-9 :00 p.m. Open House Badminton for all men 
and women: faculty and students. East Cam- 
pus Gymnasium. 

8:00 p.m. Student Union Cinematic Arts Commit- 
tee Film Series: THE COCONUTS starring 
the Marx Brothers. A wealthy widow is robbed 
of a valuable necklace and the Marx Brothers 
romp through this classic comedy in their in- 



imitable fashions. THE CABINET OF DR. 
CALIGARI starring Conrad Veidt, Werner 
Krauss, Lil Dagover. The supreme example of 
the expressionist film, CALIGARI is the "an- 
cester" of the horror film — a tale of a mysteri- 
ous doctor whose sideshow tent attraction is a 
somnambulist. The famous surrealistic sets 
are the work of three impressionists, intending 
to reflect the characters' deranged minds, 
startling film that has had an untold effect or 
the history of cinema — terrifying in its cre- 
ativity and originality. 

8 :15 p.m. The Duke Players Workshop Series. 
Branson Auditorium. 

8:30 p.m. Dad's Day Fall Concert: Duke Men's 
and Women's Glee Clubs. 



Saturday, November 9 

9 :00 a.m. The final examination of Mr. Dan Wein- 
berg for the Ph.D. degree in Physiology. Room 
385 Medical Science 1. 

9:55 a.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Chal- 
lenges in Education." WDNC Durham. Dr. 
D. R. Fowler will discuss "The Alcoholic as a 
Patient." 

2:00 p.m. Varsity Football: Duke vs. North Caro- 
lina State University. Stadium. 

3 :00-5 :00 p.m. East Campus Gymnasium : Open 
to students, faculty, and staff for recreation 
(swimming, badminton, volleyball, basketball, 
table tennis). 

7 :00 and 9 :00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page Au- 

ditorium. "BATTLE OF ALGIERS" Ex- 
citing, brilliantly filmed re-creation of Algeria 
writhing toward independence. No newsreel 
footage. All reenacted under fantastic direc- 
tion of Gillo Pontecorvo. " — Cue. "Certainly 
the most exciting and meaningful film in 
years!" — Life Magazine. "A most extraor- 
dinary film ! ' ' — New York Times. 
7:00 p.m. Student Union Presents: "An Evening 
of Jazz" with The Billy Taylor Trio and The 
Roland Kirk Quartet. Indoor Stadium. 

8 :15 p.m. Chamber Arts Society : Brazilian String 

Quartet. Music Room, East Duke Building. 



Sunday, November 10 

10:20 a.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Chal- 
lenges in Education." WCHL Chapel Hill. 
Dr. Frank W. Woods will discuss "Forestry 
Research in Ecuador." 

10:30-10:45 a.m. Carillon Recital. Mr. J. Samuel 
Hammond, University Carillonneur. 

11 :00 a.m. University Service of Worship. Univer- 
sity Chapel. Preacher: The Reverend Profes- 
sor James T. Cleland, Dean of the Chapel. 
Broadcast over Radio Station WDNC and 
WDNC-FM. 
4:00-6:00 p.m. International Open House. 2022 
Campus Drive. Speaker: Mr. Andrew Feen- 
berg. 



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7 :00 and 9 :00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page Au- 
ditorium. "BATTLE OF ALGIERS" Ex- 
citing, brilliantly filmed re-creation of Algeria 
writhing toward independence. No newsreel 
footage. All reenacted under fantastic direc- 
tion of Gillo Pontecorvo."- — Cue. "Certainly 
the most exciting and meaningful film in 
years!" — Life Magazine. "A most extraor- 
dinary film ! ' ' — New York Times. 

7:30 p.m. 1968 Duke University Symposium: KA- 
POW The Electric Media. Page Auditorium. 
(See Special Notice) 

8:30 p.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Chal- 
lenges in Education." WPTP Raleigh. Dr. 
Virginia Stone will discuss "Training Nurses 
for the Elderly." 



UNIVERSITY SERVICE OF WORSHIP 
The Reverend Dr. Roy D. Nichols, Bishop, Pitts- 
burg Area, The United Methodist Church; Member, 
Central Committee, The World Council of Churches, 
will deliver the sermon at the University Service of 
Worship on Sunday, November 3rd, at 11 :00 a.m. 
Dr. Nichol 's sermon is entitled ' ' Say the Word. ' ' 



RELIGIOUS GROUP ANNOUNCEMENTS 
Episcopal (UCM) : Thursday, 5 :15 p.m. Holy 

Communion. Sunday, 8:00 a.m. Holy Communion; 

9 :15 a.m. Choral Eucharist and sermon. 

United Campus Christian Fellowship and 
Westminster Fellowship (UCM) : These nurture 
groups of the University Christian Movement will 
meet this Sunday evening, November 3rd, at the home 
of the Waldo Beachs', Pinecrest Avenue, for a snack 
supper and to discuss "Christian Ethics and the Com- 
ing Elections" with Dr. Waldo Beach, Professor of 
Christian Ethics in the Divinity School. Rides will 
leave from the East Campus Circle at 5 :30 p.m. Fri- 
day, November 1st, 5 :45 p.m. Dinner, worship, and 
discussion in the Westminster House on Alexander 
Avenue. 

UNITARIAN-UNrTERSALIST FELLOWSHIP: The Uni- 

tarian-Universalist Fellowship of Durham and Chapel 
Hill meets at the Allied Arts Building (Proctor and 
Vickers Streets) on Sunday mornings at 10:30 a.m. 
On Sunday, November 3rd the speaker will be Nathan 
Garrett, director of the Community Development Cor- 
poration. On Sunday, November 10th, Robert Ward 
will speak on the program of the Unitarian-Univer- 
salist Service Committee. 

Catholic : Sunday, 9 :30 a.m. Mass, Room 130 Psy- 
chology-Sociology Building. Confession before Mass 
from 9:00-9:25 a.m. in Room 144 Psychology-Soci- 
ology Building. 



PRE-SYMPOSIUM FILM PROGRAM 
A pre-Symposium program dealing with the his- 
tory of the cinema will be presented on Sunday, No- 
vember 3rd, from 1:00 p.m.-l:00 a.m. in the Audi- 



torium of the Biological Sciences Building. It will 
be a free, ten-hour program which will include classic 
films by outstanding directors from 1905-1967. A 
listing of the films follows: 

"The Great Train Robbery"— Porter 

"Conquest of the Pole" — Melies 

"The Kops"— Buster Keaton 

"The Andulusian Dog" — Bunuel and Dali 

' ' Arsenal ' ' — Doushenko 

"Citizen Kane" — Welles 

"Bicycle Thief"— de Sica 

"The Golden Coach"— Renoir 

"Knife in the Water" — Polanski 

"Castro Street"— Baillie 



UCM LECTURE 
THE CRISIS IN CZECHOSLOVAKIA TODAY 
Four Czechoslovakians will discuss the recent po- 
litical events in their country at 8 :00 p.m., Sunday, 
November 3rd, in Baldwin Auditorium. This group 
has been touring the U.S., participating in a series 
of Christian-Marxist Dialogue Conferences under 
the sponsorship of the Board of Ecumenical Mission 
and Relations of the United Presbyterian Church. 
The members of the team are : Dan Drapal, a student 
of theology in Prague, Julius Tomin, an assistant in 
Marxism in the University of Prague, Lubonim Mire- 
howsky, a Senior in the church with a parish in Ta- 
bor, and Vitezalav, Professor of Marxism at the 
Military Academy in Bino. The public is invited. 



JOINT DEPARTMENTAL SEMINAR 
ZOOLOGY AND BOTANY 

The Departments of Zoology and Botany will hold 
a joint seminar on Monday, November 4th, at 4:15 
p.m. in Room 111 Biological Sciences Building. Dr. 
R. P. Levine of The Biological Laboratories, Harvard 
University, will speak on "Genetic Dissection of 
Photosynthesis. ' ' 

Professor Levine began his career as a population 
geneticist interested in Drosophila and then switched 
to studies on the mechanism of genetic recombination 
first using Drosophila and later the green alga Chla- 
mydomonas. It soon became apparent that Chlamy- 
domonas was better suited to the study of photosyn- 
thesis than recombination and in recent years Profes- 
sor Levine has exploited the genetic methodology of 
Beadle and Tatum in the stepwise dissection of photo- 
synthetic electron transport through the use of mu- 
tant strains of Chylamydomonas. 

Coffee and tea will be served in the foyer at 4 :00 
p.m. 



TOCQUEVILLE SOCIETY MEETING 
The Tocqueville Society, an educational organiza- 
tion which seeks to serve as a forum for conserva- 
tive thought on the Duke campus, will meet at 7 :00 
p.m. Monday, November 4th in Room 208 Flowers 
Building. Russ Nieli will present a paper and the 
discussion topic will be "The Vision of Alexis de 
Tocqueville." The Society endeavors to examine con- 



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servative philosophy and its relevance to the dis- 
cussion of current problems. The Tocqueville Society- 
is affiliated with the Intercollegiate Studies Institute. 



ARTS AND CRAFTS WORKSHOP 
The third session of the Arts and Crafts Work- 
shop will meet in the basement of the Ark on Mon- 
day, November 3rd, from 7:00-8:30 p.m. This week's 
instruction will consist of a painting critique given 
by Mr. Robert Barnard. Mr. Barnard, an artist- 
teacher born and educated in England, came to the 
United States in 1958. He has taught in the public 
school system of North Carolina and is presently a 
member of the art department at the University of 
North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He has exhibited 
widely, including seven one-man shows in the last 
two years. 

Mr. Robert Barnard will be at the Duke Arts 
and Crafts Workshop showing examples of his art 
work and conducting a critique for the participants 
of the Workshop. The entire University Community 
is invited to attend. 



DUKE-UNC COOPERATIVE PROGRAM IN 
RUSSIAN AND EAST EUROPEAN STUDIES 

NOTED CZECH ECONOMIST LECTURES 

Recently arrived in the United States from 
Prague, Dr. Oldrych Kyn, a noted Czech economist 
and planner will give a public lecture on Monday, 
November 4th, at 8 :00 p.m. in Room 136 Social 
Science Building. The lecture is sponsored by the 
Duke-UNC Cooperative Program in Russian and 
East European Studies as part of its regular collo- 
quia series. 

Dr. Kyn has been a lecturer in economics at the 
Charles University in Prague from 1957 until late 
this summer. Since 1964 he has also been associated 
in a research capacity with the Institute of Econom- 
ics of the Academy of Sciences and with the Central 
Price Office. He is the author of four books and 
numerous papers, both in Czech and in English, and 
is also known to Western specialists from several 
international conferences at which he represented 
Czechoslovakia. 



ENGINEERING GUEST SPEAKER 
The first of the 1968-69 Engineering Guest 
Speaker Programs will be held on Tuesday, November 
5th, from 12 :50 to 1 -.40 p.m. in the Engineering Au- 
ditorium, Room 125 Engineering Building. Dr. 
John E. Gibson, Dean of the School of Engineering, 
Oakland University, Rochester, Michigan will speak 
on "Engineering Design." 

Dean Gibson is interested in servo-mechanisms, 
automatic controls, and high speed transportation. 
He is a consultant to the Electronics Research Cen- 
ter, NASA in Cambridge, Massachusetts on Control 
and Information Systems. 



FOREST ECOLOGY SEMINAR 
On Tuesday, November 5th, Mr. Vaughn Hofeldt, 
Assistant Regional Forester of the Southern Region 
of the United States Forest Service, will present a 
talk on ' ' The Forest Manager — Coordinator for Pub- 
lic Use." The seminar will be held at 4:00 p.m. in 
Room 130 Biological Sciences Building. 



FACULTY CLUB ELECTION EVE PARTY 
The Faculty Club will hold an election eve party 
on Tuesday, November 5th, at 7 :30 p.m. at the Teer 
House, Roxboro Road at Frazier Street. Refresh- 
ments will be served and there will be a small fee to 
cover the cost. Each couple may bring a couple as 
guests. 



THE DUKE PLAYERS WORKSHOP SERIES 
The Duke Players Workshop Series has been 
established for the production of readings, student 
directed plays, and new and experimental works. It 
is intended to be an open laboratory for the mem- 
bers of the university community where they may 
develop their interests and abilities in the theatre by 
practical experience. 

The current production of the Workshop Series 
is a bill of one act plays: KRAPP'S LAST TAPE 
by Samuel Beckett and THE ZOO STORY by Ed- 
ward Albee. These will be presented on the evenings 
of Friday and Saturday, November 8th and 9th, at 
8:15 p.m. in Branson Auditorium on the East Cam- 
pus. Tickets, priced at $1.00, will go on sale on 
Monday, November 4th in the following locations: 
Page Auditorium Box Office (8:30 a.m.-l:00 p.m.) 
and Branson Auditorium Box Office (2:00-5:00 p.m.). 
Reservations may be made by calling 684-3181. 

These two plays enjoyed long runs Off-Broadway. 
KRAPP'S LAST TAPE is a portrait of a lonely and 
aging man who lives a shabby existence in a dark- 
ened room. At year's end he takes out a bottle of 
wine, a banana and his tape recorder, and listens as 
his own voice of times past recounts the glories and 
hopes of his youthful years. There is a sharp ironic 
contrast between the vibrant youth that he was and 
the shabby life into which he has declined. THE 
ZOO STORY depicts an encounter between two men 
in Central Park. A man sits peacefully reading in 
the sunlight. There enters a second man, the an- 
tithesis of the first. He is a young, unkempt and un- 
disciplined vagrant, where the first is neat, ordered, 
well-to-do, conventional. The vagrant, a soul in tor- 
ture and rebellion, longs to communicate so fiercely 
that, when he does make the attempt, he alternately 
frightens and repels his listener. He is a man drained 
of all hope who, in his passion for company, seeks 
to drain his companion. With ironic humor and un- 
relenting suspense we see the young savage slowly 
but relentlessly bring his victim down to his own 
atavistic level and initiates a shocking and horrible 
ending. 



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DAD'S DAY— FALL CONCERT 
DUKE MEN'S AND WOMEN'S GLEE CLUBS 
The Pall Concert of the Duke University Men's 
and Women's Glee Clubs will be presented on Fri- 
day, November 8th, at 8 :30 p.m. in Page Auditorium. 
The Glee Clubs are under the direction of Paul 
Young, Conductor; Benjamin Smith, Jr., Visiting 
Choral Conductor; and James Young, Assistant Di- 
rector and Accompanist. The soloists for the eve- 
ning will be : Gretchen Rufty, soprano ; Joanne Hoff- 
man, mezzo-soprano ; Lesley Wasserman, bass ; and 
John Herpel, tenor. The concert is planned as part 
of the entertainment honoring Dad's Day weekend 
guests. The program follows: 

I 

All Glory, Laud, and Honor 
My Spirit, be Joyful 

from Cantata No. 146 
Caligaverunt Oculi Mei 
(My Eyes are Blinded With Weeping) 

II 



Harmonized by J. S. Bach 
J. S. Bach 

Michael Haydn 



Wolfgang A. Mozart 
W. A. Mozart 



With Voices Rejoicing 
Song of the Courtiers 

(from the Marriage of Figaro) 

My Heart Commends Itself to Thee Orlando di Lasso 

Shenandoah arr. Marshall Bartholomew 

Soon Ah Will Be Done arr. William L. Dawson 

Men's Glee Club 

III 

Ave Maria Zoltan Kodaly 

Benedictus Gabriel Faure 

(from Messe Basse Pour Voix De Femmes) 
Gaude Barbara Giovanni P. da Palestrina 



IV 

Three Voices 

En passant par la Lorraine 

The Trysting Place 

O Rise, Shine 1 

(Negro Spiritual) 

You Goin' to Reap Just What You Sow 

(Negro Spiritual) 

INTERMISSION 

Mass in G Minor R. Vaughan Williams 

Women's and Men's Glee Clubs 



Johannes Brahms 

arr. J. A. F. 

Johannes Brahms 

arr. Carl Parrish 

arr. H. T. Burleigh 



"AN EVENING OF JAZZ" 

BILLY TAYLOR TRIO 
ROLAND KIRK QUARTET 

"An Evening of Jazz" will be presented by the 
Duke Student Union as the after-game Dad's Day 
Weekend entertainment on Saturday, November 9th 
at 7 :00 p.m. in the Indoor Stadium. The concert will 
feature the dynamic jazz pianist, Billy Taylor and 
his Trio and the remarkable jazz virtuoso, Roland 
Kirk with his Quartet. Tickets, priced at $2.50 for 
reserved section seating and $2.00 general admission, 
are available at the West Quadrangle ticket booth 
and the Page Box Office. Tickets will also be avail- 
able at the Indoor Stadium ticket window immediate- 
ly following the game, remaining open until perfor- 
mance time. Because of the excellence of the perfor- 
mers, the concert may well be one of the most en- 
joyable evenings of the fall for all ages and tastes. 

Billy Taylor is one of the finest pianists in jazz, 



a noted jazz disk jockey, a composer, arranger, au- 
thor, lecturer, actor and TV personality. Winner of 
Down Beat Magazine's first annual Critics Poll, Mr. 
Taylor is an accomplished and highly inventive mu- 
sician whose art reaches every member of any audi- 
ence. Whether he 's interpreting a modern pop classic 
such as "Sunny," cooking on an up-tempo blues 
number, or playing one of his own numerous com- 
positions, his technique is awesome and his ideas 
compelling. 

Critical acclaim has followed Billy's career ever 
since he brought his talents to New York after grad- 
uating from college. "Billy Taylor has that happiest 
of combinations : technique, taste and imagination. 
Few modern jazz pianists play the instrument as 
engagingly as he does." — John S. Wilson (N. Y. 
Times). 

As a lecturer and performer he has visited many 
of the nation's top colleges and universities. The 
music world has shown its esteem for this remarkable 
professional by naming him to the executive boards 
of the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sci- 
ences, the Newport Jazz Festival, the Harlem Cul- 
tural Council, the American Society of Composers, 
the Council for the Arts and Government, and the 
jazz advisory committee to the Lincoln Center for 
the Performing Arts. 

Roland Kirk is a remarkable musician — imagina- 
tive, uninhibited and above all musical. When this 
multi-instrumentalist (he is master of 45 instru- 
ments) first hit the limelight, some jazz critics called 
him a freak — a musical gimmick. But then they be- 
gan to listen and discovered that this blind, self- 
taught musician was an instrumental wizard, equally 
at home with one or multiple instruments. 

Roland Kirk has pioneered a totally new musical 
concept, the technique of playing multiple instru- 
ments simultaneously, to produce a powerful and 
deeply meaningful art. Yet he remains one of the 
most provocative single-horn soloists in jazz. On 
reed instruments his fiery and often humorous im- 
provisations hold listeners spell-bound. His widely 
imitated innovation in jazz flute playing, the use 
of vocal sounds combined with the sound of the in- 
strument, has earned him first place in the flute 
category on many jazz polls. 

Despite his very advanced technical concepts, Mr. 
Kirk hews very closely to the mainstream of modern 
jazz. Most importantly for the listener, Roland is a 
tremendously exciting and entertaining performer, 
who can and will bring any audience to its feet by 
the beauty and passion of his playing. Critics are 
equally enthusiastic: "He is a visual, as well as a 
musical experience. Three reed instruments, two of 
his own invention, hang from his neck. A whistle, a 
siren, a flute, a nose flute, and castanets are all at- 
tached to him in some manner. He plays all of these 
separately, in unison, in three-part harmony, and, 
lately, in counterpoint with himself. 



ART DEPARTMENT LECTURE 
Dr. Erwin Walter Palm, Professor of History of 
Art and Civilization of the Iberian and Ibero-Ameri- 



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can Nations, University of Heidelberg, Germany, will 
deliver a lecture entitled "DIEGO VELAZQUEZ: 
Some New Observations on His Work" on Tuesday, 
November 5th, in Room 139 Social Science Building at 
8 :15 p.m. 

Professor Palm is an outstanding authority in 
the field of Hispano-American art and architecture. 
His monumental two volume work on the architec- 
ture of Santo Domingo as well as his numerous ar- 
ticles in various learned art history journals has 
earned him an international reputation as a scholar 
of the first rank. 



YM-YWCA ELECTION DISCUSSION 
The Duke YM-YWCA will sponsor an informal 
discussion and viewing of election results on Tues- 
day evening, November 5th in Room 208 Flowers 
Building beginning at 8:30 p.m. Several television 
sets will be in the room and everyone is invited. 



PSYCHOLOGY COLLOQUIUM 
The Department of Psychology will hold a collo- 
quium on Wednesday, November 6th, in the Karl E. 
Zener Memorial Auditorium, Room 130 Psychology- 
Sociology Building at 4 :00 p.m. Dr. Donald. Adams, 
Professor Emeritus, Duke University, will speak on 
"The Duke Psychology Department." 



DUKE-DURHAM OPEN DISCUSSION 
BLACK SOLIDARITY COMMITTEE BOYCOTT 
A discussion, sponsored by the Duke YM-YWCA, 
of the Black Solidarity Committee Boycott of Dur- 
ham businesses will be held Wednesday, November 
6th, at 8 :00 p.m. in the Music Room, East Duke Build- 
ing. Conducting Wednesday night's discussion will 
be officers of the Chamber of Commerce. Background 
statements will be presented followed by open discus- 
sion. 



DUKE LAW FORUM 
The Duke Law Forum will sponsor the address of 
Mr. Arlen Specter, District Attorney of Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania, on Friday, November 8th, at 11:00 
a.m. in the Law School Courtroom. Mr. Specter will 
discuss "Creative Law Enforcement," The public is 
invited. 



CHEMISTRY STAFF SEMINAR 
Dr. Frederick D. Greene, Department of Chemis- 
try, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, will speak 
at the Chemistry Staff Seminar on Friday, Novem- 
ber 8th, at 3:30 p.m. in Room 130 Psychology-Soci- 
ology Building. The subject of Dr. Greene's address 
will be "Some Problems in Small Ring Chemistry." 
All interested persons are cordially invited to attend. 



DAD'S DAY WEEKEND 

The YMCA sponsors "Dad's Day" each fall to 
provide an opportunity for fathers to visit their sons 
and become acquainted with the University from the 
student's viewpoint. In this year of turmoil in Amer- 
ican universities Dad's Day '68 presents a chance 
for more parental understanding of the new genera- 
tion emerging from American campuses. Mothers are 
also invited to participate. Schedule for Dad's Day: 

Friday, November 8 

1 :00-S :30 p.m. Registration. Flowers Lounge. 

6:00p.m. Banquet. Great Hall. Speaker: President Douglas 
M. Knight 

8:00p.m. S.U. Film Series: "The Coconuts" and "The Cab- 
inet of Dr. Caligari." Auditorium, Biological Sci- 
ences Building. 

8:15p.m. Duke Players: One Act Plays. Branson Auditorium. 

8:30p.m. Concert: Joint Duke Men's and Women's Glee 
Clubs. Page Auditorium. 

Saturday, November 9 

11:00 a.m.-l:00 p.m. Dad's Day Picnic Baseball Field. 

2:00p.m. Football Game: Duke vs. N. C. State University. 

Stadium. 
7 :00 p.m. S.U. "Evening of Jazz." Indoor Stadium. 

Sunday, November 10th 

11:00a.m. Special Service of Worship: Duke Chapel. 

Preacher : The Reverend Professor James T. Cle- 

land, Dean of the Chapel. 



CHAMBER ARTS SOCIETY 
BRAZILIAN STRING QUARTET 
The Chamber Arts Society will present the sec- 
ond concert of the season, to be played by the Bra- 
zilian String Quartet, Saturday, November 9th at 
8 :15 p.m. in the Music Room, East Duke Building. 
The musicians are Santino Parpinelli and Jaques 
Mirenberg (violins), Henrique Nirenberg (viola), 
and Eugen Ranevsky (cello). The program follows: 



Quartet in G Major, K. 156 

Quartet No. 3 in D minor "Brasileiro" 

Quartet No. 17 



Mozart 
Nepomuceno 
Villa Lobos 



Admission is by Membership Card or Guest Card. 
All Membership Cards have been subscribed for the 
year. Guest Cards in limited number, up to the total 
room capacity of 430 seats, will be available from 
7 :30 to 8 :00 p.m. at the door of the Music Room be- 
fore the concert. Guest Cards are priced at $2.50 for 
a single admission, and may not be reserved in ad- 
vance except by members of the Society. 

Other chamber music concerts scheduled for this 
season include : 



Saturday, December 7th 
Saturday, January 18th 
Saturday, February 8th 
Saturday, March 22nd 



Hungarian Quartet 

Borodin Quartet (Moscow) 

Igor Kipnis (Harpsichord) 

Fine Arts Quartet 



Inquiries may be addressed to The Chamber Arts 
Society, Box 6065 College Station. 



FINAL EXAMINATION 

FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. Dan Weinberg for 

the Ph.D. degree in Physiology will be held on Sat- 



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urday, November 9th at (9:00 a.m.) in Room 385 
Medical Science 1. The subject of Mr. Weinberg's 
dissertation is "Electrical Excitation Of The Canine 
Heart." 

The committee to conduct the examination con- 
sists of Dr. J. Salzano, P. Horowicz, E. A. Johnson, 
J. Artley. and 0. Meier, Jr. Professor J. Salzano 
will preside. 



INTERNATIONAL HOUSE OPEN LECTURE 
"IS MAN DEAD?" 
Members of the University Community are invited 
to hear Mr. Andrew Feenberg of the Philosophy De- 
partment in an open lecture at 4 :00 p.m. Sunday, 
November 10th at the International House. 2022 Cam- 
pus Drive. Currently a member of the Department 
of Philosophy, Mr. Feenberg was a student of Her- 
bert Marcuse and is in his first year at Duke after 
a period of study in France. He will discuss the 
"death of philosophy" in Europe and America, and 
the relation of this problem to the great political 
conflicts of our time. 



1968 DUKE SYMPOSIUM 
"KAPOW— THE ELECTRIC MEDIA" 
NOVEMBER 10-12 

In its selection of the topic for the 1968 Sympo- 
sium, the Committee expressed concern about under- 
standing the social effects of the all-encompassing 
Mass Media — its potential accomplishments and detri- 
ments on twentieth century American culture. It 
has become apparent that television and motion pic- 
tures have a tremendous intellectual effect in bring- 
ing the arts, polities, and entertainment to the level 
of all the people. It is also apparent that the mis- 
use of this power might lead to disastrous results, as 
Michael Harrington states it, "an entire way of life 
committed to machine-tooled mediocrity." It is hoped 
that Symposium '68 will examine these effects and 
the responsibility of the Media to the society. 

The participants in the 1968 Symposium are: 

MICHAEL J. ARLEN, television critic ("The Air") 

of the New York Magazine 
STAN FREBERG. creative advertiser 
OTTO PREMINGER, producer-director-actor of 40 
of Hollywood's most financially successful films, 
amonsr which are: "Exodus," "The Cardinal," 
"Advise and Consent," "Stalag 17," and "For- 
ever Amber." 
RICHARD SCHICKEL, film critic of Life Maga- 
zine, author of The Disney Version, The Stars 
The title of this year's Svmposium is KAPOW 
The Electric Media. KAPOW was chosen to empha- 
size the McLuhanesque definition of the Media: non- 
rational, nonlinear extensions of man which are bom- 
barding the psyche. 

The schedule of Symposium '68 is: 

Sunday, November 10 

7:30 p.m. Page Auditorium 

First Session. Topic: "Is Art Possible in the Mass 
Media?" Mr. Preminger will respond to this question 



by showing his new film "Skidoo" (to be released to 
the public in December). 
A panel discussion will follow. Dr. John Clum will mod- 
erate. 

Monday, November 11 

10:30 a.m.-12:00 noon 208 Flowers Building 

Seminar : Mr. Otto Preminger 
3:00-4:30 p.m. 208 Flowers Building 

Seminar : Mr. Michael Arlen 
8:00 p.m. Page Auditorium 

Second Session. Topic : "The Commercial Demands of 

the Mass Media." — Mr. Stan Freberg 

A panel discussion will follow. Dr. Richard White will 

moderate. 

Tuesday, November 12 

10:30 a.m.-12:00 noon 208 Flowers Building 

Seminar : Mr. Richard Schickel 
3:00-4:30 p.m. 208 Flowers Building 

Seminar : Mr. Stan Freberg 
8 :00 p.m. Page Auditorium 

Third Session. Topic: "The Media and Society." 
Mr. Richard Schickel — "The Role of the Critic in In- 
fluencing the Artist and Public Tastes" 
Mr. Michael Arlen — "The Role of the Media in Influ- 
encing Public Opinion Concerning the 1968 Election 
Year and the War in Viet Nam" 
A panel discussion will follow. Mr. David Paletz will 
moderate. 

The Symposium Committee is composed of under- 
Erraduate and graduate students and selected faculty 
members. The Symposium is financed primarily by 
student contributions. This will be the tenth Sym- 
posium. 

All programs are open to the public without 
charge. 



STUDENT UNION ART EXHIBITION 

"HOW A LITHOGRAPH IS MADE" 

W. C. LIBRARY GALLERY 

An educational exhibition of special interest to 
artists, teachers and art students, as well as to the 
public, "How a Lithograph is Made," is now hang- 
ing in the Gallery area of the Woman's College 
Library. East Campus. The exhibit may be seen 
during regular library hours through Sunday, No- 
vember 17th. Tamarind Lithography Workshop, 
Inc., in Los Angeles, a non-profit organization de- 
voted to the stimulation and preservation of the art 
of the lithograph, prepared and lent the exhibition 
to The American Federation of Arts for circulation 
throughout the United States and is presented as 
part of the Student Union Graphics Arts presenta- 
tions to the campus and community. 

The exhibition, consisting of photographs and 
texts mounted on panels, explains how a lithograph 
by Jose Luis Cuevas was conceived and created. The 
actual lithograph is included in the exhibition to 
complete the story being presented. 

Europe enjoys a long tradition of artists work- 
ing together with artisans to create etchings, litho- 
graphs, bronzes, tapestries, ceramics, books and 
stained glass windows; however in the United States 



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the artist is just beginning to enter the collaborative 
art media because there has been a lack of artisans. 
In lithography where artisans are appearing, sig- 
nificant creativity is taking place ; in fact, new media 
are developing based on industrial technology. 

Although Tamarind is not a commercial atelier, 
they simulated a commercial publishing venture to 
study the many esthetics, technical and economic 
factors involved in creating an original lithograph. 
In this exhibition, the publisher was the Los Ange- 
les Orchestral Society, but the facts would have been 
the same had a gallery desired an edition by an 
artist of its stable, or had an artist been creating 
an edition for himself. The Society wished to com- 
memorate its 20th anniversary festival with an orig- 
inal lithograph. The officers approached Jose Luis 
Cuevas to undertake the assignment who proposed 
a quote from Beethoven as the title — "Music is a 
Higher Revelation than Philosophy." 



SUMMER 1969 EUROPEAN GROUP PLIGHTS 
For the eighth consecutive year, the Student Ac- 
tivities Office, 207 Flowers Building, is offering Duke 
European Group Fare Flights to members of the 
Duke University Community (faculty, staff, students, 
and employees). The Activities Office will provide 
tickets only for economy class jet air transportation. 
All other arrangements are the responsibility of the 
individual. 

Advance notice is announced for the time sched- 
ules of the Duke University European Group Flights. 
Full information will be available within the next 
two weeks. 

Flight 1 Depart June 9 Return August 28 

Flight 2 Depart June 9 Return August 26 

Flight 3 Depart June 10 Return July 14 

Flight 4 Depart July 23 Return August 27 

Flights 1, 3, and 4 are round trip New York City-London. 
Flight 2 is round trip Washington Dulles-Paris. 



November 1, 1968 Number 8 

Published by Duke University Student Activities Department each week when school is in 
session. Subscriptions : $2.50 per year. Address inquiries to Box KM, Duke Station, Durham, 
North Carolina 27706. Application to mail at second class postage rates is pending at Durham, 
North Carolina. 

IMPORTANT— Notices for the Duke University Calendar should be submitted 

IN WRITTEN FORM to Room 207 Flowers Building, West Campus not later 

than 5:00 p.m., Tuesday. Extension 2911. 



Ouke University 

^ALENDAR_ 



^1 




Nov. 10-17, 1968 



Sunday, November 10 

10:20 a.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Chal- 
lenges in Education." WCHL Chapel Hill. 
Dr. Frank W. Woods will discuss "Forestry 
Research in Ecuador." 

10:30-10:45 a.m. Carillon Recital. Mr. J. Samuel 
Hammond, University Carillonneur. 

11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship. Univer- 
sity Chapel. Preacher: The Reverend Profes- 
sor James T. Cleland, Dean of the Chapel. 
Sermon: "Saint Dad " Broadcast over Radio 
Station WDNC and WDNC-FM. 

2:00-4:50 p.m. Sorority Parties. Carr Building. 

4:00-6:00 p.m. International Open House. 2022 
Campus Drive. Speaker: Mr. Andrew Feen- 
berg. 

7:30 p.m. 1968 Duke Symposium: "KAPOW The 
Electric Media." Page Auditorium. Speaker: 
Mr. Otto Preminger. (See Special Notice) 

8:30 p.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Chal- 
lenges in Education." WPTF Raleigh. Dr. 
Virginia Stone will discuss "Training Nurses 
for the Elderly." 



Monday, November 11 

8 :30 a.m.-5 :00 p.m. Pre-registration. 

9:30-11:00 a.m. WSGA Lounge Open. Lobby, East 
Campus Union. 

10 :30 a.m.-12 :00 noon 1968 Duke Symposium Semi- 
nar: Mr. Otto Preminger. Room 208 Flowers 
Building. 

3 :00-4 :30 p.m. 1968 Duke Symposium Seminar : Mr. 
Michael Arlen. Room 208 Flowers. 

4 :15-5 :30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women : 
faculty, staff members, and students. 

6:15 p.m. AAUW Meeting. YWCA, Chapel Hill 
Street. Speaker : Dr. Samuel S. Hill. 

7 :00 p.m. International Folk Dancing. The Ark, 
East Campus. 

7:00-8:30 p.m. Arts and Crafts Workshop. Water- 
color Techniques. Basement, The Ark. 



8:00 p.m. 1968 Duke Symposium: "KAPOW The 
Electric Media." Page Auditorium. Speaker: 
Mr. Stan Freberg. 



Tuesday, November 12 

8:30 a.m.-5:00 p.m. Pre-registration. 

9:30-11:00 a.m. WSGA Lounge Open. Lobby, East 
Campus Union. 

10 :00 a.m. Divinity School Chapel Service. York 
Chapel. Speaker: Dr. Gene Tucker. Reader: 
Mr. John McMullen. 

10 :30 a.m.-12 :00 noon 1968 Duke Symposium Semi- 
nar: Mr. Richard Schickel. Room 208 Flowers 
Building. 

3:00-4:30 p.m. 1968 Duke Symposium Seminar : Mr. 
Stan Freberg. Room 208 Flowers Building. 

4 :00 p.m. Forest Ecology Seminar. Room 130 Bio- 
logical Sciences Building. Speaker: Mr. Lloyd 
W. Swift, Jr. 

4:15-5:30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for wom- 
en : faculty, staff members, and students. 

7 :30-10 :00 p.m. Scottish Country Dancing. Presby- 
terian Student Center. 

8:00 p.m. 1968 Duke Symposium: "KAPOW The 
Electric Media. " Page Auditorium. Speakers: 
Mr. Richard Schickel and Mr. Michael Arlen. 



Wednesday, November 13 

8:30 a.m. -5:00 p.m. Pre-registration. 

9:30-11:00 a.m. WSGA Lounge Open. Lobby, East 
Campus Union. 

10:00 a.m. Divinity School Chapel. York Chapel. 
Speaker: Dr. Gene Tucker. Reader: Mr. Bob 
Cofield. 

10:00 a.m. Campus Club Meeting. Lounge, New 
Section, West Campus Library. 

4:15-5:30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. 



7 :00-8 :30 p.m. Chapel Choir Rehearsal. University 
Chapel. 

7 :00-9 :00 p.m. Open House Badminton for all men 
and women: faculty and students. East Cam- 
pus Gymnasium. 

7:30 p.m. Folk Music Cluh Meeting. Room 208 
Flowers Building. 



Thursday, November 14 

8:30 a.m.-5:00 p.m. Pre-registration. 

9 :30-ll :00 a.m. WSGA Lounge Open. Lobby, East 

Campus Union. 
10:00 a.m. Divinity School Chapel. York Chapel. 

Speaker: Mr. Bill Climer. Reader: Dr. Gene 

Tucker. 
3:30 p.m. Physiology-Pharmacology Seminar. Room 

385 Medical Sciences 1. Speaker: Dr. George 

Somjen. 
4 :00 p.m. Undergraduate Faculty Council Meeting. 

Room 208 Flowers Building. 

4 :15-5 :30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women : 
faculty, staff members, and students. 

5:15 p.m. Faculty Volleyball. Card Gymnasium. 

7:30 p.m. Duke Medical Center Amateur Radio 
Club Meeting. Room 2031 Medical Center. 

8:15-9:30 p.m. West Campus Swimming Pool open 
to faculty members and their families. Fac- 
ulty children will be admitted only when ac- 
companied by their parents. 



Friday, November 15 

9:30-11:00 a.m. WSGA Lounge Open. Lobby, East 
Campus Union. 

10:00 a.m. Divinity School Chapel Service. York 
Chapel. Speaker : Mr. Tom Nolin. 

3 :30 p.m. Chemistry Staff Seminar. Room 130 Psy- 
chology-Sociology Building. Speaker: Profes- 
sor Lindsay H. Briggs. 

4:15-5:30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. Faculty 
daughters, ages 6 to 16, may also swim; those 
10 and under must be accompanied by their 
mothers. 

7 :00-9 :00 p.m. Open House Badminton for all men 
and women : faculty and students. East Cam- 
pus Gymnasium. 

8 :00 p.m. Student Union Cinematic Arts Film 
Series: "JULES AND JIM" starring Jeanne 
Moreau, Oskar Werner, Henri Serre. A truly 
beautiful, romantic film — witty, spontaneous, 
natural. A celebration of love, life, and death. 
Truffaut received the best director award for 



"Jules and Jim" at the Mar Del Plata Festi- 
val — universally acknowledged as a great di- 
rector, many critics regard Truffaut as the 
leader of New Wave directors. Auditorium, 
Biological Sciences Building. 

:15 p.m. Duke Symphony Orchestra Concert. 
Pagre Auditorium. 



Saturday, November 16 

9:55 a.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Chal 
lenges in Education." WDNC Durham. Di 
Frank W. Woods will discuss "Forestry Re 
search in Ecuador." 

2:00 p.m. Varsity Football: Duke vs. Wake Forest 
Stadium. 

3 :00-5 :00 p.m. East Campus Gymnasium : Oper 
to students, faculty, and staff for recreatior 
(swimming, badminton, volleyball, basketba 
table tennis). 

7 :00 and 9 :15 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page Au- 
ditorium. "TOM JONES" with Albert Fin- 
ney, Hugh Griffith, Susannah York, Dame 
Edith Evans and Joan Greenwood. "Brilliant 
ly designed, exuberantly robust, rowdy, bawdy, 
and racingly funny retelling of Fielding' 
classic 18th Century novel of rural England. 
Heady mixture of comedy and drama . 
— Cue. In color. 



Sunday, November 17 

10:20 a.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Chal- 
lenges in Education." WCHL Chapel Hill. 
Mr. Ashbel Brice will discuss "About a Uni- 
versity Press." 

10:30-10:45 a.m. Carillon Recital. Mr. J. Samuel 
Hammond, University Carillonneur. 

11 :00 a.m. University Service of Worship. Univer- 
sity Chapel. Preacher: The Reverend Dr. 
Howard C. Wilkinson, Chaplain to the Univer- 
sity. Broadcast over Radio Station WDNC and 
WDNC-FM. 

4:00 p.m. Senior Organ Recital. Mr. William D. 
Gudger. University Chapel. 

4:00-6:00 p.m. International Open House. 2022 
Campus Drive. 

7 :00 and 9 :15 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page Au- 
ditorium. "TOM JONES" with Albert Fin- 
ney, Hugh Griffith, Susannah York, Dame 
Edith Evans and Joan Greenwood. "Brilliant- 
ly designed, exuberantly robust, rowdy, bawdy, 
and racingly funny retelling of Fielding's 
classic 18th Century novel of rural England. 
Heady mixture of comedy and drama ..." 
— Cue. In color. 



(2) 



8:30 p.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Chal- 
lenges in Education." WPTF Raleigh. Dr. 
Everett H. Ellinwood, Jr. will discuss "Am- 
phetamine Intoxication." 



UNIVERSITY SERVICE OF WORSHIP 
The Reverend Dr. James T. Cleland, Dean of the 
Chapel, will deliver the sermon at the University Ser- 
vice of Worship on Sunday, November 10th, at 11 :00 
a.m. in the University Chapel. The Reverend Elmer 
0. Hall, Assistant Chaplain to the University, will be 
the presiding Minister and Mr. Harrison W. Farber, 
Chairman, YMCA Dad's Day Committee, the Lector. 

The order of worship follows : 
Opening Organ Voluntary — 

"Pastorale," Opus 19 
Choral Adoration — "Osanna I" 

from Mass in G Minor 
Hymn 

Unison Prayers of Confession and for Pardon 
Words of Assurance 
Anthem — "And the Glory of the Lord" 

from The Messiah 
Scripture Lesson — Matthew 1 :18-2S 
The Gloria Patri 
Greeting and Call to Prayer 
Pastoral Prayers of Thanksgiving, Intercession, 

and Supplication 
The Lord's Prayer 
Sermon — "Saint Dad" 
Prayer 
Hymn 
The Offering 

Offertory Organ Interlude 

Anthem— "Lift Up Your Heads, O Ye Gates" 
from The Messiah 

Response — The Doxology 
Prayer of Dedication 
Benediction 

Choral Response — "Sevenfold Amen" 
The Chimes 
Closing Organ Voluntary — 

"Rhosymedre" R. Vaughan Williams 



Cesar Franck 
R. Vaughan Williams 



Handel 



Handel 



Stainer 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 
RELIGIOUS ORGANIZATIONS 
EPISCOPAL (UCM): Thursday, 5:15 p.m. Holy Commu- 
nion. Sunday, 8:00 a.m. Holy Communion; 9:15 p.m. Cho- 
ral Eucharist and sermon. 

UNITED CAMPUS CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP and 
WESTMINSTER FELLOWSHIP (UCM) : Sunday, No- 
vember 10th, 5 :30 p.m., Supper at Gilbert-Addoms House. 
Discussion : 1968 Duke Symposium. 

Friday, November 15th, 5 :45 p.m. Supper, worship and 
discussion. Westminster House, Alexander Avenue. 
UCM Sunday Night Community. Sunday, November 10th, 
5 :30 p.m. Supper, worship and a consideration of three in- 
ner questions and conflicts which haunt man and influence 
his understanding of himself : his search for identity, his 
struggle with alienation, and his quest for meaning. The 
group will adjourn for the Symposium. 

THE UNITARIAN-UNIVERSALIST FELLOWSHIP of 
Durham and Chapel Hill. Sunday, 10:30 a.m., Allied Arts 
Building. On Sunday, November 10th, Robert Ward will 
speak on the program of the Unitarian-Universalist Service 
Committee. On Sunday, November 17th, Alden Lind, Pro- 
fessor of Political Science at UNC and State Chairman of 
McCarthy for President Organization, will speak on "Where 
Do We Go From Here?" 



CATHOLIC: Sunday, 9:30 a.m. Mass, Room 130 Psychology- 
Sociology Building. Confession before Mass from 9 :00-9 :25 
a.m. Room 144 Psychology- Sociology Building. 

SOCIETY OF FRIENDS (QUAKERS) : Sunday, November 
10th, 10:30 a.m. Worship. 11:30 a.m. Discussion: "Quak- 
erism, A View from the Backbenches." Discussion Leader : 
Ernest Hartley. 12 :00 p.m. Pot Luck Dinner at Meeting 
House, 404 Alexander Avenue. For information contact 
Ernest Hartley, 383-4692 or extension 2694. 

BAHAT FAITH: Sunday, November 10th, 6:00 p.m. Prayer 
and Meditation. 6:30 p.m. Meeting: "The Lord is Come." 
Home of Mr. and Mrs. A. Allison, 501 North Queen Street. 
Sunday, November 17th, 6:00 p.m. Prayer and Meditation. 
6:30 p.m. Meeting: "The Renewal of Civilization." Van 
Sombeek residence, 1903 Essex Road. 



INTERNATIONAL HOUSE OPEN LECTURE 
"IS MAN DEAD?" 
Members of the University Community are invited 
to hear Mr. Andrew Feenberg of the Philosophy De- 
partment in an open lecture at 4 :00 p.m. Sunday, 
November 10th at the International House. 2022 Cam- 
pus Drive. Currently a member of the Department 
of Philosophy, Mr. Feenberg was a student of Her- 
bert Marcuse and is in his first year at Duke after 
a period of study in France. He will discuss the 
"death of philosophy" in Europe and America, and 
the relation of this problem to the great political 
conflicts of our time. 



1968 DUKE SYMPOSIUM 

"KAPOW— THE ELECTRIC MEDIA" 

NOVEMBER 10-12 

In its selection of the topic for the 1968 Sympo- 
sium, the Committee expressed concern about under- 
standing the social effects of the all-encompassing 
Mass Media — its potential accomplishments and detri- 
ments on twentieth century American culture. It 
has become apparent that television and motion pic- 
tures have a tremendous intellectual effect in bring- 
ing the arts, politics, and entertainment to the level 
of all the people. It is also apparent that the mis- 
use of this power might lead to disastrous results, as 
Michael Harrington states it, "an entire way of life 
committed to machine-tooled mediocrity." It is hoped 
that Symposium '68 will examine these effects and 
the responsibility of the Media to the society. 

The participants in the 1968 Symposium are: 

MICHAEL J. ARLEN, television critic ("The Air") 
of the New York Magazine 

STAN FREBERG, creative advertiser 

OTTO PREMINGER, producer-director-actor of 40 
of Hollywood's most financially successful films, 
among which are: "Exodus," "The Cardinal," 
"Advise and Consent," "Stalag 17," and "For- 
ever Amber." 

RICHARD SCHICKEL, film critic of Life Maga- 
zine, author of The Disney Version, The Stars 
The title of this year's Symposium is KAPOW 

The Electric Media. KAPOW was chosen to empha- 



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size the McLuhanesque definition of the Media: non- 
rational, nonlinear extensions of man which are bom- 
barding the psyche. 

The schedule of Symposium '68 is: 

Sunday, November 10 

7 :30 p.m. Page Auditorium 

First Session. Topic: "Is Art Possible in the Mass 
Media?" Mr. Preminger will respond to this question 
by showing his new film "Skidoo" (to be released to 
the public in December). 
A panel discussion will follow. Dr. John Clum will mod- 
erate. 



208 Flowers Building 
208 Flowers Building 



Monday, November 11 
10:30 a.m.-12:00 noon 

Seminar : Mr. Otto Preminger 
3:00-4:30 p.m. 

Seminar : Mr. Michael Arlen 
8:00 p.m. Page Auditorium 

Second Session. Topic : "The Commercial Demands of 

the Mass Media." — Mr. Stan Freberg 

A panel discussion will follow. Dr. Richard White will 

moderate. 

Tuesday, November 12 

10 :30 a.m.-12 :00 noon 208 Flowers Building 

Seminar : Mr. Richard Schickel 
3:00-4:30 p.m. 208 Flowers Building 

Seminar : Mr. Stan Freberg 
8:00 p.m. Page Auditorium 

Third Session. Topic : "The Media and Society." 
Mr. Richard Schickel — "The Role of the Critic in In- 
fluencing the Artist and Public Tastes" 
Mr. Michael Arlen — "The Role of the Media in Influ- 
encing Public Opinion Concerning the 1968 Election 
Year and the War in Viet Nam" 
A panel discussion will follow. Mr. David Paletz will 
moderate. 

The Symposium Committee is composed of under- 
graduate and graduate students and selected faculty 
members. The Symposium is financed primarily by 
student contributions. This will be the tenth Sym- 
posium. 

All programs are open to the public without 
charge. 



AAUW MEETING 
The American Association of University "Women. 
Durham Branch, will meet on Mondav night. Novem- 
ber 11th. at the YWCA on Chapel Hill Street with 
dinner at 6 :15 p.m. by reservation only and program 
at 7 :00 p.m. open to all. Dr. Samuel S. Hill, Chairman 
of the Department of Religion at U.N.C. in Chapel 
Hill, will speak on "The New Morality." All women 
college graduates in the Durham area are invited to 
attend. 



INTERNATIONAL FOLK DANCING 

International folk dancing, sponsored by Hillel. 
will meet every Monday evening in the Ark on East 
Campus at 7 :00 p.m. Instruction in beginning, inter- 
mediate, and advanced dances will be given from 
7 :00-9 :00 p.m. After 9 :00 p.m. requested dances will 
be played without instruction. Scandinavia, Israel, 
Russia, England, North America, the Middle East, 



Latin America, Japan, the Balkan States, and Ger- 
many are among the areas represented in the dancing. 
The group is open to any who would like to help 
expand the repertoire, who want to learn, or who 
just like to dance. 



ARTS AND CRAFTS WORKSHOP 
Watercolor painting will be the topic of the Arts 
and Crafts Workshop on Monday, November 11th, 
from 7 :00-8 :30 p.m. in the basement of the Ark. Mr. 
W. K. Stars of the Duke Art Department, the general 
director of the Arts and Crafts Workshop series, will 
demonstrate watercolor techniques. 

The eight-week painting series consists of Monday 
night instruction or critique sessions from 7 :00-8 :30 
p.m., and open, independent studio sessions other 
week nights from 6 :00-8 :00 p.m. The Arts and Crafts 
Workshops are open to all members of the Duke 
Community and are geared to both beginning and 
advanced students. 



FOREST ECOLOGY SEMINAR 
Mr. Lloyd W. Swift, Jr., Associate Meteorologist 
at the Coweeta Hydrologic Laboratory, will present 
a talk at the Forest Ecology Seminar on Tuesday, 
November 12th, at 4:00 p.m. in Room 130 Biological 
Sciences Building. His topic will be "Wildland 
Management Practices Affect the Water Resource." 



CAMPUS CLUB MEETING 
The Campus Club of Duke University will have 
a coffee on Wednesday, November 13th, at 10 :00 a.m. 
in the lounge of the new library, West Campus. At 
10:45 a.m. Dr. Benjamin Powell. University Librar- 
ian, will speak on "The Duke Library." A guided 
tour of the new facilities will follow with Mrs. Ben- 
jamin Powell as chairman for the event. The Hostess 
department is Library. Parking will be available in 
front of the Chapel. The overflow will be directed to 
the Law and Biology Buildings, there to take the 
free bus. 



FOLK MUSIC CLUB MEETING 
The first meeting of the Duke University Folk 
Music Club will be held on Wednesdav. November 
13th. at 7:30 p.m. in Room 208 Flowers. All in- 
terested members of the University Community (mu- 
sicians and enthusiasts) are invited to attend. 



PHYSIOLOGY AND PHARMACOLOGY 

SEMINAR 
Dr. George Somjen of the Department of Physiol- 
ogy and Pharmacology will speak at the Physiology- 
Pharmacology Seminar on Thursday. November 14th, 
at 3:30 p.m. in Room 385 Medical Sciences 1. Dr. 
Somjen will discuss "Intra- and extracellular Ex- 
periments on the Effects of Mg++ and Ca++ on Cen- 
tral Neurons." 



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UNDERGRADUATE FACULTY COUNCIL 
MEETING 

The Undergraduate Faculty Council will meet on 
Thursday, November 14th, at 4:00 p.m., in Room 
208 Flowers Building. 



DUKE MEDICAL CENTER 
AMATEUR RADIO CLUB 
The Duke University Medical Center Amateur 
Radio Club, whose members operate Radio Station 
WB4BLK, and are responsible for maintaining Proj- 
ect MedAID, will hold its first meeting of the aca- 
demic year on Thursday evening, November 14th, at 
7 :30 p.m. The meeting will be in Room 2031 of the 
Medical Center, and the primary items of business 
will be planning the year's activities and programs, 
and the reorganization of the club, with nominations 
to be considered for new officers. Membership in 
"DUMCARC" is open to all amateur operators in 
the University Community, and the multi-band equip- 
ment maintained by the Club is available for use 
by all licensed members. All interested persons are 
invited to attend the meeting. For further informa- 
tion, contact Warren Bird at extension 2092. 



PLANT ECOLOGY SEMINAR 
Mr. Bruce Haines, graduate student in the Bot- 
any Department, will present a talk entitled "Biot- 
ically Induced South-facing Cliff Formation in Un- 
consolidated Alluvium of Santa Ynez Valley, Cali- 
fornia" at the Plant Ecology Seminar on Friday, 
November 15th, at 12 :30 p.m. in Room 144 Biological 
Science Building. 



CHEMISTRY STAFF SEMINAR 
Professor Lindsay H. Briggs, University of Auk- 
land, New Zealand and presently Visiting Professor, 
U.N.C. School of Pharmacy, Chapel Hill and Visiting 
Scientist at the Research Triangle Institute, will 
speak at the Chemistry Staff Seminar on Friday, 
November 15th, at 3 :30 p.m. in Room 130 Psychology- 
Sociology Building. The subject of Professor Briggs' 
address will be "Chemistry of New Zealand Plants 
and Fungi." All interested persons are cordially 
invited to attend. 



FALL CONCERT 
DUKE SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 

The eighty five piece Duke Symphony Orchestra 
under the baton of Professor Allan Bone will present 



its fall concert in Page Auditorium on Friday eve- 
ning, November 15th, at 8 :15 p.m. The program 
will open with the Mahler "Symphony No. 4 in G 
Major" and will conclude with the "Concerto for 
Violin and Orchestra in D Major" by Beethoven. 
Giorgio Ciompi will be featured in the Beethoven 
Concerto and Mary Burgess, soprano, in the Mahler. 
The public is invited to the concert without charge. 

Distinguished artist-violinist, Giorgio Ciompi, is 
a member of the Duke Music Faculty. Mr. Ciompi 
was a former member of the Albeneri Trio and was 
a member of the NBC Symphony under Toscanini. 
A frequent participant in the Casals Festival Orches- 
tra in Puerto Rico, Mr. Ciompi was head of the violin 
division of the Cleveland Institute of Music before 
coming to Duke in 1964. 

Mary Burgess, soprano and a new member of the 
Duke Music Faculty, will be the soloist in the final 
movement of the Mahler "Symphony No. 4 in G 
Major." A resident of Chapel Hill as Mrs. John 
Madden, she is well known through her many sum- 
mers at the Marlboro Music Festival in Vermont and 
frequent appearances in New York City. Her most 
recent participation there was in the New York City 
Opera's Gilbert and Sullivan presentations and the 
Mozart Festival at Lincoln Center. 



SENIOR ORGAN RECITAL 
WILLIAM D. GUDGER 
William D. Gudger, an organ student of Mildred 
L. Hendrix, will present his senior organ recital on 
Sunday, November 17th, at 4 :00 p.m. in the Univer- 
sity Chapel. Mr. Gudger will play works by Coup- 
erin, Bach, Langlais, Franck, and Messiaen. The 
public is cordially invited. 



ANTHROPOLOGICAL EXHIBITS 
Two ethnographic exhibits are now on display in 
the Psychology-Sociology Building on West Campus. 
In the downstairs hall are four glass cases containing 
the Norma and William Rowe New Guinea High- 
lands and Coastal Papua Collection, featuring Bird- 
of-Paradise feather head-dresses and ceremonial 
bride-price stone axes. 

In the second floor lobby outside the Sociology and 
Anthropology Department office is shown the La 
Barre Collection from the Aymara of the Lake Tit- 
icaca region and the Uru of the Rio Desaguadero 
swamps on the frontier of Peru and Bolivia, featur- 
ing llama and vicuna wool textiles and artificially 
deformed skulls. 

Both exhibitions will be on display for the re- 
mainder of the fall semester. 



November 8, 1968 Number 9 

Published by Duke University Student Activities Department each week when school is in 
session. Subscriptions : $2.50 per year. Address inquiries to Box KM, Duke Station, Durham, 
North Carolina 27706. Application to mail at second class postage rates is pending at Durham, 
North Carolina. 

IMPORTANT — Notices for the Duke University Calendar should be submitted 

IN WRITTEN FORM to Room 207 Flowers Building, West Campus not later 

than 5:00 p.m., Tuesday. Extension 2911. 



%ke University 

"ALENDARJ1 



^ 

^A 




Nov. 17-24, 1968 



11:00 



4:00 



Sunday, November 17 



10:20 a.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Challenges in 
Education." WCHL Chapel Hill. Mr. Ashbel Brice 
will discuss "About a University Press." 

10:30-10:45 a.m. Carillon Recital, Mr. J. Samuel 
Hammond, University Carollonneur. 
a.m. University Service of Worship. University 
Chapel. Preacher: The Reverend Dr. Howard C. 
Wilkinson, Chaplain to the University. Sermon: 
"Worship the Gods of a Defeated Enemy?" 
Broadcast over Radio Station WDNC and 
WDNC-FM. 

p.m. Senior Organ Recital. Mr. William D. Gudger. 
University Chapel. 

4:00-6:00 p.m. International Open House. 2022 Campus 
Drive. 

7:00 and 9:15 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page Auditorium. 
"TOM JONES" with Albert Finney, Hugh Griffith, 
Susannah York, Dame Edith Evans and Joan 
Greenwood. "Brilliantly designed, exuberantly 
robust, rowdy, bawdy, and racingly funny retelling 
of Fielding's classic 18th Century novel of rural 
England. Heady mixture of comedy and 
drama..."— Cue. In color. 

8:30 p.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Challenges in 
Education." WPTF Raleigh. Dr. Everett H. 
Ellinwood, Jr. will discuss "Amphetamine 
Intoxication." 

Monday, November 18 

9:00 a.m. The final examination of Mr. John Goodwin 

Dennis for the Ph.D. degree in Botany. Room 141 

Biological Sciences Building. 
9:30-11:00 a.m. WSGA Lounge Open. Lobby, East Campus 

Union. 
12:30 p.m. Forest Ecology Seminar. Room 130 Biological 

Sciences Building. Speaker: Mr. A. R. Bond, 
p.m. S.U. Major Speakers Seminar. Participants: Dr. 

Clark Kerr, Dr. D. M. Knight, Mr. Wade Norris, and 

others. Place to be announced, 
p.m. Mathematics Colloquium. Room 114 Physics 

Building. Speaker: Professor Gerald P. Weeg. 
4:15-5:30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 

faculty, staff members, and students. 
7:00 p.m. Tocqueville Society Meeting. Room 208 Flowers 

Building. Speaker: Mr. Ken Kuehnle. 
7:00-8:30 p.m. Arts and Crafts Workshop. Painting Critique 

by Lynn Igoe. Basement, The Ark. 

p.m. International Folk Dancing. The Ark East 

Campus. 

p.m. Post-Symposium Program. Hospital 
Amphitheater. 
8:15 p.m. Student Union Major Speakers Series: Dr. Clark 
Kerr. Page Auditorium. 



3:30 



4:00 



7:00 
7:30 



Tuesday, November 19 

9:30-11:00 a.m. WSGA Lounge Open. Lobby, East Campus 
Union. 
10:00 a.m. Divinity School Chapel Service. University 

Chapel. Speaker: Dr. Moody Smith. Reader: Mr. 

Jimmy Creech. 
10:00 a.m. Duke Law Forum: Senator Philip A. Hart 

(D-Michigan). Law School Courtroom. 
4:15-5:30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 

faculty, staff members, and students. 
4:30 p.m. Asian Studies Lecture: Mrs. Kusum Nair. Room 

139 Social Science Building. 
7:30-10:00 p.m. Scottish Country Dancing. Presbyterian 

Student Center. 
8:15 p.m. Piano Recital: Stefan Bardas. Music Room, East 

Duke Building. 
8:15 p.m. Duke International Law Society: Mr. Adrian S. 

Fisher. Law School Courtroom. 

Wednesday, November 20 

9:30-11.00 a.m. WSGA Lounge Open. Lobby, East Campus 

Union. 
10:00 a.m. Divinity School Chapel University Chapel. 

Speaker: Dr. Moody Smith. Reader: Mr. Robert 

Leeds. 
2:00 p.m. Divinity School Seminar Lecture: Dr. Robert L. 

Browning. Room 208 Flowers Building. 
4:15-5:30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 

faculty, staff members, and students. 
7:00-8:30 p.m. Chapel Choir Rehearsal. University Chapel. 
7:00-9:99 p.m. Open House Badminton for all men and 

women: faculty and students. East Campus 

Gymnasium. 
7:30 p.m. Stefan Bardas Master Class. Music Room, East 

Duke Building. 
7:30 p.m. People for the Land and Healthful Environment 

Society. Room 144 Biological Sciences Building. 
8:00 p.m. Bench and Bar Meeting. Room 139 Social 

Science Building. Speaker: Dean A. K. Pye. 
8:00 p.m. Duke-UNC East Asian Colloquium Public 

Lecture. Alumni Parlor, East Duke Building. 

Speaker: Dr. Robert Jay Lifton. 

Thursday, November 21 

9:30-11:00 a.m. WSGA Lounge Open. Lobby, East Campus 

Union. 
10:00 a.m. Divinity School Coffee House Worship: Mr Pat 

Welch. 



12:30 p.m. Kappa Delta Pi Luncheon Meeting. East 

Campus Union. Speaker: Dr. John Altrocchi. 
4:00 p.m. Academic Council Meeting. Room 208 Flowers 

Building. 
4:15-5:30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 

faculty, staff members, and students. 
5:00-6:00 p.m. Dean's Hour. Hospital Amphitheater. 

Speaker: Dr. Robert Jay Lifton. 
5:15 p.m. Faculty Volleyball. Card Gymnasium. 
8:00 p.m. Trent Society Meeting. Teer House, 4019 North 

Roxboro Road. Speaker: Dr. David T. Smith. 
8:00 p.m. Newcomers Club Meeting. An Evening at Home 

with Dr. and Mrs. James Semans, 1415 Bivins 

Avenue. 
8:15-9:30 p.m. West Campus Swimming Pool open to 

faculty members and their families. Faculty children 

will be admitted only when accompanied by their 

parents. 
8:15 p.m. Archaeological Institute Lecture. Karl Zener 

Auditorium, Psychology- Sociology Building. 

Speaker: Brother S. Dominic Ruegg, F.S.C. 

Friday, November 22 

9:30-11:00 a.m. WSGA Lounge Open. Lobby, East Campus 

Union. 
10:00 a.m. Divinity School Chapel Service. University 

Chapel. Service of Holy Communion. 
12:30 p.m. Plant Ecology Seminar. Room 144 Biological 

Sciences Building. Speaker: Mr. Shu-fun Au. 
3:30 p.m. Chemistry Staff Seminar. Room 130 

Psychology-Sociology Building. Speaker: Professor 

Richard S. Juvet, Jr. 
4:15-5:30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 

faculty, staff members, and students. Faculty 

daughters, ages 6 to 16, may also swim; those 10 and 

under must be accompanied by their mothers. 
7:00-9:00 p.m. Open House Badminton for all men and 

women: faculty and students. East Campus 

Gymnasium. 
8:15 p.m. Broadway at Duke: "You Know I Can't Hear 

You When the Water's Running." Page Auditorium. 

Saturday, November 23 



9:55 a.m. Duke University Radio Program "Challenges in 
Education." WDNC Durham. Mr. Ashel Brice will 
discuss "About A University Press." 

1:30 p.m. Varsity Football: Duke vs. University of North 
Carolina. Chapel Hill. 

3:00-5:00 p.m. East Campus Gymnasium: Open to 
students, faculty, and staff for recreation 
(swimming, badminton, volleyball, basketball, table 
tennis). 

7:00 p.m. Student Union Major Attraction: "The Sam and 
Dave Revue." Indoor Stadium. 

7:10 and 9:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page Auditorium. 
"PERSONA" with Bibi Andersson and Liv Ulmann. 
"Director Ingmar Bergman studies search for 
identity and self-fulfillment through intense, strange, 
intimately photographed story of two women. An 
acress retreats into silence, her nurse pours out her 
own life story, physical attachment grows and 
eventually there is an emotional exchange of 
identity. Beautifully acted, engrossing. . ."-Cue. 

8:15 p.m. Music Faculty Series: Betty Bullock Talbot, 
pianist. Music Room, East Duke Building. 



Sunday, November 24 

10:20 a.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Challenges in 
Education." WCHL Chapel Hill. Dr. Rebecca 
Buckley will discuss "Defects in Immunity." 

10:30-10:45 a.m. Carillon Recital. Mr. J. Samuel 
Hammond, University Carollonneur. 

11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship. University 
Chapel. Preacher: The Reverend Dr. McMurry S. 
Richey, Chairman, Duke University Religious 
Council, and Professor of Theology and Christian 
Nurture. Broadcast over Radio Station WDNC and 
WDNC-FM. 

4:00-6:00m. International Open House. 2022 Campus 
Drive. 

7:10 and 9:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page Auditorium. 
"PERSONA" with Bibi Anderson and Liv Ullmann. 
"Director Ingmar Bergman studies search for 
identity and self-fulfillment through intense, strange, 
intimately photographed story of two women. An 
acress retreats into silence, her nurse pours out her 
own life story, physical attachment grows and 
eventually there is an emotional exchange of 
identity. Beautifully acted, engrossing. . ."-Cue. 

8:00 p.m. Student Union Major Speakers Series: Mrs. Jeane 
Dixon. Baldwin Auditorium. 

8:30 p.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Challenges in 
Education." WPTF Raleigh. Dr. D. R. Fowler will 
discuss "The Alcoholic as a Patient." 



UNIVERSITY SERVICE OF WORSHIP 

The Reverend Dr. Howard C. Wilkinson, Chaplain to the 
University, will deliver the sermon at the University Service 
of Worship on Sunday, November 17th, at 11:00 a.m. The 
sermon topic is "Worship the Gods of a Defeated Enemy?" 



SENIOR ORGAN RECITAL 
WILLIAM D. GUDGER 

William D. Gudger, an outstanding organ student of 
Mildred L. Hendrix, will present an organ recital on 
Sunday, November 17th at 4:00 p.m. in the University 
Chapel. Mr. Gudger, a native of Candler, North Carolina, 
studied piano with Joseph Berggrun of Asheville and his 
initial organ work was with Henry Loftquist, Jr. For several 
years he was organist of Montmorenci Methodist Church in 
Candler. Mr. Gudger is a graduate of Enka High School and 
attends Duke on an American Enka National Merit 
Scholarship. 

While at Duke he has often been guest organist at several 
Durham churches and for various services in the Duke 
University Chapel. In addition, he continued piano with 
Professor Loren Withers and Ronald Fishbaugh and studied 
harpsichord and keyboard accompaniment with Mrs. Ruth 
Friedberg. A composition student of Professor Paul Ears 
and Mary Duke Biddle Professor Iain Hamilton, he was 
awarded the 1968 Henry Schuman Prize for an original 
work, "Songs of Experience for 'cello, tenor and piano." 
Mr. Gudger is majoring in music history and plans graduate 
work in that field. 



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RELIGIOUS ORGANIZATIONS 
ANNOUNCEMENTS 

UNITED CAMPUS CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP AND 

WESTMINSTER FELLOWSHIP (UCM). 

5:30 p.m. Sunday, November 17th. Supper meeting with 

NCC. Congregational Christian Church, Hwy. 751. (Rides 

depart East Campus Circle at 5: 30 p.m.). 

5:45 p.m. Friday, November 22nd. Dinner, Worship, and 

Discussion. Westminster House, Alexander Avenue. 

UCM. 5:30 p.m. Sunday, November 17th. Supper, Worship, 

and Discussion. Methodist Student Center. 

4:00 p.m. Sunday, November 17th. Decision Making Body 

of UCM Meeting. Episcopal Student Center. 

5:30 p.m. Sunday, November 24th. Supper and Discussion. 

Episcopal Student Center. Topic: Discussion of Michael 

Novak's "Human first. Christian Second." Also, Celebration 

of the Rejoice Mass with the "Jazz Journey Men" combo. 

Reservations needed: call 684-2921 by Friday, November 

22nd. The University community is invited. 

EPISCOPAL. 5:15 p.m. Thursday, November 21st. Holy 

Communion. 

8:00 a.m. Sunday, November 17th and Sunday, November 

24th. Holy Communion. 

9:15 a.m. Sunday, November 17th and Sunday, November 

24th. Choral Eucharist and sermon. 

UNITARIAN-UNIVERSALIST FELLOWSHIP. 10:30 

a.m. Sunday, November 17th. Meeting, Allied Arts 

Building, 810 Proctor Street. Speaker: Alden Lind, UNC 

Professor of Political Science and State Chairman of 

McCarthy for President Organization. Topic: "Where Do 

We Go From Here?" 

10:30 a.m. Sunday, November 24th. Meeting, Allied Arts 

Building. Speaker: Dr. George Gove. Topic: "Modern Music 

in Worship." 

HILLEL. 12:00 noon, Sunday, November 17th. Lox and 

bagel brunch. East Campus Center. Charge: $.75 for 

non-members and $.25 for members. Guest: Rabbi Saul 

Kraft, Hillel Director, Queens College, N.Y. and 1967-68 

Visiting Professor in Jewish Life and Thought at 

Georgetown University. 

5:00 o.m. Sunday, November 17th. Weekly supper, Oak 

Room. 

7:00 p.m. Every Monday. Folk Dancing, The Ark. 

CATHOLIC. 9:30 a.m. Sunday. Mass, Room 130 

Psychology-Sociology Building. Confession before Mass 

from 9:00—9:25 a.m. Room 144 Psychology-Sociology 

Building. 

SOCIETY OF FRIENDS (QUAKERS). 10:30 a.m. Sunday, 

November 17th and November 24th. Worship. 

11:30 a.m. Sunday, November 17th and November 24th. 

Meeting. 404 Alexander Avenue. 

BAHAT FAITH. 6:00 p.m. Sunday, November 17th. Prayer 

and Meditation. 

6:30 p.m. Meeting: "The Renewal of Civilization." Van 

Sombeek residence, 1903 Essex Road. 

FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. John Goodwin Dennis for 
the Ph.D degree in Botany will be held on Monday, 
November 18th at 9:00 a.m. in Room 141 Biological 
Sciences Building. The subject of Mr. Dennis' dissertation is 
"Growth of Tundra Vegetation in Relation to Arctic 
Microenvironments at Barrow, Alaska." 



The committee to conduct the examination consists of 
Professors W. D. Billings, Lewis Anderson, Paul Kramer, 
Henry Hallmers and Joseph R. Bailey. 

Professor Billings will preside. 



FOREST ECOLOGY SEMINAR 

On Monday, November 18th, Mr. A. R. Bond, Maryland 
State Forester, will present a talk at the Forest Ecology 
Seminar entitled "Trees for the People-A State Forestry 
Program." The seminar will be held at 12:30 p.m. in Room 
130 Biological Sciences Building. 



MATHEMATICS COLLOQUIM 

Professor Gerald P. Weeg, Chairman, Computer Science 
Department, University of Iowa, will speak at the 
Mathematics Colloquim on Monday, November 18th, at 
4:00 p.m. in Room 114 Physics Building. The subject will 
be "On the Automorphism Groups of Factor Automata." 
The talk will be preceded by tea and coffee at 3:30 p.m. in 
Room 138 Physics Building. 



TOCQUEVILLE SOCIETY MEETING 

The Tocqueville Society, an inter-disciplinary study 
group affiliated with the Intercollegiate Studies Institute, 
will meet on Monday, November 18th, at 7:00 p.m. in 
Room 208 Flowers Building. Mr. Ken Kuehnle, a second 
year law student, will present a paper entitled "The Masses 
on the Right: Implications of the Experience of the 
American Liberty League." 

The presentation will include a brief discussion of the 
nature of mass movements; an examination of the 
American Liberty League, a mass movement formed in the 
1930's in opposition to the New Deal; and a discussion of 
what techniques might be employed by conservatives in 
order to appeal to greater segments of the population. This 
regular meeting of the Tocqueville Society is open to all 
interested. 



ARTS AND CRAFTS WORKSHOP 

The second in a series of painting critiques sponsored by 
the Arts and Crafts Workshop will be conducted Monday, 
November 18th, from 7:00-8:30 p.m. in the basement of 
the Ark. The guest artist delivering the critique will be 
Lynn Igoe, Acting Chairman of the Art Department at 
North Carolina College. 

Lynn Igoe received her masters degree in painting from 
the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She has 
taught part time at Duke and UNC, and has contributed 
paintings to numerous exhibitions and galleries. Her ninth 
one-man show is on view during the month of November at 
the Wesley Foundation, Chapel Hill. 

All members of the Duke Community— students, faculty, 
and staff— are invited to bring their paintings for individual 
criticism and group discussion. The Arts and Crafts 
Workshop alternates these critique sessions with 
instructional periods on Monday nights (7:00-8:30 p.m.), 
and offers open independent studio sessions in the Ark 
from 6:00-8:00 p.m. Tuesday through Friday. 



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POST-SYMPOSIUM PROGRAM 

A post-Symposium program, sponsored by the School of 
Nursing, will be held in the Hospital Amphitheater on 
Monday, November 18th at 7:30 p.m. The program, 
entitled "Mass Media and the Nursing Image," will include a 
panel discussion with local television and newspaper 
respresentatives. 

S.U. MAJOR SPEAKERS SERIES 
DR. CLARK KERR 

The Student Union Major Speakers Committee will 
present an address by Dr. Clark Kerr, Chairman of the 
Carnegie Commission on the Future of Higher Education 
and former President of the University of California at 
Berkeley, on Monday, November 18th, at 8:15 p.m. There 
will be a seminar with Dr. Kerr, Dr. Douglas Knight, Wade 
Norris, and other students on Monday, November 18th, at 
3:30 p.m. 

Dr. Clark Kerr has had careers in university education, 
industrial relations, and public service. He was appointed 
Chancellor of Berkeley campus in 1952 and served as 
President of the University of California from 1958 to 
1967, a tremendous period of growth and reorganization. 

In addition to his career as University educator. Dr. Kerr 
has had a second career in industrial relations, first at 
Berkeley organizing the Institute of Industrial Relations 
after the war, and teaching Industrial Relations until 1950, 
and second as arbitrator in many industries in California. 
Dr. Kerr has also served on advisory boards to Presidents 
Truman, Eisenhower, Kennedy and Johnson. 

Books by Dr. Kerr reflect his interests — The Uses of the 
University and Labor and Management in Industrial 
Society. 



DUKE LAW FORUM 
SENATOR PHILIP A. HART (D-MICHIGAN) 

Senator Philip A. Hart (D-Michigan) will speak at the 
Law School Forum on Tuesday, November 19th, at 10:00 
a.m. in the Law School Courtroom. The public is invited to 
attend. 

Senator Hart was elected to the Senate in 1958 and 
re-elected in 1964. He has served on the Senate Judiciary, 
Commerce, and Democratic Policy Committees. He is 
presently Chairman of the Senate Subcommittee on 
Anti-trust and Monopoly and was elected Assistant 
Majority Whip in 1966 and 1967. He was appointed to the 
National Commission on the Causes and Prevention of 
Violence. Senator Hart recently led the floor fight for 
Senate approval of the nomination of Abe Fortas for Chief 
Justice. 

ASIAN STUDIES LECTURE 
MRS. KUSUM NAIR 

Mrs. Kusum Nair, widely-acclaimed author of "Blossoms 
in the Dust," and "The Lonely Furrow," will give a public 
lecture on Tuesday, November 19th in Room 139 Social 
Science Building at 4:30 p.m. An authority on Indian 
agronomy and economics, Mrs. Nair is a journalist and 
visiting professor at Michigan State University for the 
current academic year. Her lecture at Duke University is 
sponsored by the Program in Comparative Studies on 
Southern Asia. She will speak on "Innovation in Rural 
India: Mirage or Miracle." 



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STEFAN BARDAS 

IN 

SEMINAR FOR PIANO TEACHERS 

The Durham Music Teachers Association will present 
Stefan Bardas in a Seminar for Piano Teachers on Tuesday 
and Wednesday, November 19th and 20th. The day sessions 
will be held from 9:00 a.m. until 1:00 a.m. in the Temple 
Baptist Church, 807 West Chapel Hill Street. A recital by 
Mr. Bardas will be presented on Tuesday evening at 8:15 
p.m. in the Music Room, East Duke Building with tickets 
available at the door priced at $1.00 for adults and $.50 for 
students. Duke students will be admitted free by the 
presentation of their ID cards. On Wednesday evening, ateo 
in the Music Room of East Duke Building, Mr. Bardas will 
hold a master class at 7:15 p.m. For this session admission 
will be by tickets at the door priced at $1.00 for adults; 
$.50 for students, and free admission for Duke students 
presenting ID cards. 

There will be a $5.00 fee for non-registered pianists 
wishing to play in the Wednesday master class. Mr. Bardas 
will be available Tuesday and Wednesday afternoons for 
private lessons and for classes of two persons. 

Since his arrival from Europe, where he studied piano 
with Edwin Fischer, Artur Schnabel and Alfred Casella, 
Stefan Bardas has established himself as one of this 
country's most brilliant concert artists. Formerly official 
pianist for the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, Mr. Bardas 
has been featured soloist in several important premiere 
performances of modern works under world-renowned 
conductors. His performance (premiere) of Copland's 
tremendous Piano-Fantasy, with the composer in the 
audience, was hailed by reviewers as a sensation. Mr. Bardas 
has held teaching positions at Illinois Wesleyan, 
Northwestern University, the University of Tulsa, and has 
been visiting artist in-residence at the University of 
Colorado and Washington University. He is now resident 
pianist at North Texas State University. 

In addition to the major standard and contemporary 
piano concerti and the concert literature of the classic, 
romantic and modern idioms, his repertoire includes all of 
the Chopin, Debussy and Liszt-Paganini Etudes, the 
thirty-two Beethoven piano sonatoas, and the twenty-four 
Chopin Preludes. Noel Straus, reviewing a Bardas concert in 
the New York Times, has written, "...Formidable 
program.. .readings that were decidely his own. Masterly 
virtuosity. ..variety of moods and colors.. .beauty of 
tone.. .Monumental performance.. .interpretation original 
and of heroic proportions." 

The recital program follows: Preludio II (sopra melodie 
gregoriane)— Ottorino Respighi; "The Alcotts" (from 
Concord Sonata)— Charles Ives; Rondo in C Major (from 
Sonata, Opus 24)— Carl Maria von Weber; Phantasy in C 
Major, Opus 17-Robert Schumann: INTERMISSION; 
Sonata in C Minor, Opus 13 (Pathetique), Grave-Allegro di 
molto e con brio, Adagio cantabile. Rondo: 
Allegro — Ludwig van Beethoven; 
Rigoletto-Paraphrase— Franz Liszt. 

DUKE INTERNATIONAL LAW SOCIETY 
SPEAKER: ADRIAN S. FISHER 

Mr. Adrian S. Fisher, Deputy Director, U.S. Arms 
Control and Disarmament Agency, will speak on 
"Confrontation with Russia— Negotiation" at Duke 
International Law Society meeting on Tuesday, November 
19th, at 8:15 p.m. in the Law School Courtroom. The 
public is cordially invited. 






A graduate of Princeton University (Phi Beta Kappa, 
1934), and Harvard Law School (1937), Mr. Fisher clerked 
for both Supreme Court Justices Brandeis (1938) and 
Frankfurter (1939). He served in a variety of government 
positions including: technical advisor to U.S. Judges at 
Nuremburg (1946); Solicitor, U.S. Department of 
Commerce (1947-48); AEC Counsel (1948-49); Legal 
Advisor, Department of State (1949-53). He has held his 
present position since 1961. 

Mr. Fisher is also a former member of Covington and 
Burling (Washington, D.C.), a former professor of 
international law and trade at Georgetown Law Center, and 
is presently vice-president and counsel for the Washington 
Post Company. Mr. Fisher played a major role in the 
drafting and negotiation of the non-proliferation treaty 
presently awaiting senate ratification. 



Dr. 



DIVINITY SCHOOL SEMINAR LECTURE 
Robert L. Browning, Professor of Christian 



Education, Methodist Theological School, Delaware, Ohio, 
will speak on "The Generation Gap" at the Divinity School 
Seminar on Wednesday, November 20th. The seminar will 
be held in Room 208 Flowers Building at 2:00 p.m. 



PEOPLE FOR THE LAND AND HEALTHFUL 
ENVIRONMENT SOCIETY 

The People for the Land and Healthful Environment 
Society will meet at 7:30 p.m. on Wednesday, November 
20th, in Room 144 Biological Sciences Building. This 
society is a population and conservation oriented society, 
concerned with preserving a healthful environment. All 
interested persons are invited to attend. 



BENCH AND BAR MEETING 

Dean A. K. Pye will speak on "The Legal Education" at 
the Bench and Bar meeting on Wednesday, November 20th, 
at 8:00 p.m. in Room 139 Social Science Building. The 
public is invited. 



DUKE-UNC EAST ASIAN COLLOQUIM 
PUBLIC LECTURE 

The East Asian Colloquium announces the first public 
lecture in a series to be presented throughout the year. Dr. 
Robert Jay Lifton, M.D., Foundations' Fund Research 
Professor of Psychiatry at the Yale University School of 
Medicine, will present a lecture entitled "Revolutionary 
Immortality: Mao Tse-tung and the Cultural Revolution," 
on Wednesday, November 20th, at 8:00 p.m. in the Alumni 
Parlor of East Duke Building. 

Dr. Lifton is a noted psychiatrist who has written the 
widely acclaimed Though Reform and the Psychology of 
Totalism, an analysis of the nature and effects of Chinese 
techniques of thought reform on personality types. He is 
also the author of a recent study of the effects of the 
atomic bombing of Hiroshima on the survivors entitled,Li'/e 
and Death: Survivors of Hiroshima which has received wide 
attention and praise. Refreshments will be served following 
the lecture and the public is cordially invited to attend. 



KAPPA DELTA PI LUNCHEON MEETING 

Kappa Delta Pi, Education Honorary, will hold its 
monthly luncheon meeting on Thursday, November 21st, in 
the East Campus Union at 12:30 p.m. Dr. John Altrocchi 
of the Department of Medical Psychology will speak on 
"Community Mental Health and the Schools." 



ACADEMIC COUNCIL MEETING 

The Academic Council will meet on Thursday, 
November 21st, at 4:00 p.m. in Room 208 Flowers 
Building. 



DEAN'S HOUR 

The Dean's Hour will be held on Thursday, November 
21st, at 5:00 p.m. in the Hospital Amphitheater. Dr. 
Robert Jay Lifton, Professor of Psychiatry, Yale University 
will speak on "Hiroshima and the American Physician." 



TRENT SOCIETY MEETING 

The Trent Society, an informal group of medical faculty 
and students and all others interested in the history of 
medicine, will meet at the Teer House, 4019 North 
Roxboro Road, Thursday, November 21st, at 8:00 p.m. Dr. 
David T. Smith, James B. Duke Professor of Microbiology 
will relate "A Personal History of Autogenous Vaccines." A 
few old books will be offered for sale. All interested 
persons are invited to attend. Those planning to attend are 
asked to advise the Library Secretary, extension 3505. 



ARCHAEOLOGICAL INSTITUTE LECTURE 
BROTHER S. DOMINIC RUEGG, F.S.C. 

Brother S. Dominic Ruegg, F.S.C, of St. Mary's College 
(California) will give an illustrated lecture on "Underwater 
Excavation in the Garigliano River (Liris)" at 8:15 p.m. 
Thursday, November 21st, in the Karl Zener Auditorium, 
Psychology-Sociology Building. The University Community 
is cordially invited to this year's first meeting at Duke of 
the North Carolina Society, Archaeological Institute of 
America. 

Brother Ruegg has participated in excavations with the 
American School of Classical Studies at Athens, at Tell 
Arad with the Hebrew University, and at Teleilat Ghassul 
(as Assistant Field Director) with the Britist School of 
Archaeology, Jerusalem. He is currently Director of the 
Excavations in the Garigliano River, Italy, under the 
auspices of the Council of Underwater Archaeology. 



PLANT ECOLOGY SEMINAR 

Mr. Shu-fun Au, graduate student in Botany, will speak 
on "The Vegetation and Ecological Processes on Shakleford 
Bank, North Carolina" at the Plant Ecology Seminar in 
Room 144 Biological Sciences Building on Friday, 
November 22nd, at 12:30 p.m. 



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CHEMISTRY STAFF SEMINAR 

Professor Richard S. Juvet, Jr., Department of 
Chemistry, University of Illinois, will speak at the 
Chemistry Staff Seminar on Friday, November 22nd, at 
3:30 p.m. in Room 130 Psychology -Sociology Building. 
The subject of Professor Juvet's address will be 
"Separation, Thermodynamics and Complex Formation 
Studies of Metal Halides in Fused-Saltsum Gas 
Chromatography." All interested persons are cordially 
invited to attend. 

BROADWAY AT DUKE 
"YOU KNOW I CAN'T HEAR YOU 
WHEN THE WATER'S RUNNING" 

The Broadway hit comedy "You Know I Can't Hear 
You When the Water's Running" will initiate the Student 
Union' "Broadway at Duke" series on Friday, November 
22nd, at 8:15 p.m. in Page Auditorium. The Student Union 
Drama Committee, in it's first effort with a Professional 
drama series, has received enthusiastic support from the 
entire community. A few remaining single tickets are 
available at the Page Box Office for the first two 
performances, "You Know I Can't Hear You When the 
Water's Running" and the Viveca Lindfor's "You, Me, and 
the World." No more tickets are available for the "Man of 
La Mancha" evening performance, but tickets are available 
for a recently scheduled matinee performance on the same 
day, Friday, February 21st, 1969, at 4:00 p.m. 

Playwright Robert Anderson obviously approves of 
marriage, and "You Know I Can't Hear You When the 
Water's Running" is a beautifully written love letter to the 
institution. The quartet of one-act plays, which will star 
Imogene Coca and King Donovan, are also hilarious, 
enchanting, and wonderfully comic, to quote just a few of 
the many bravos accorded to this hit Broadway comedy 
when it opened in New York on March 13th, 1966. Mr. 
Anderson surveys the familiar topic of sex in marriage from 
different angles— from young couples to middle-aged 
spouses to couples past the prime of life. And always he 
brings good sense, sympathetic understanding, and fleeting 
moments of tenderness and sentimentality to the way that 
people think about, act on, and remember the age-old 
problems in the battle of the sexes. 

STUDENT UNION MAJOR ATTRACTION 

The Student Union Major Attractions Committee will 
present "The Sam and Dave Revue" as the pop 
entertainment following the football game with UNC on 
Saturday, November 23rd. The entertainment will be 
presented in the Duke Indoor Stadium at 7:00 p.m. Tickets 
priced at $3.50 for reserved seats and $3.00 for general 
admission are available at the West Quadrangle ticket booth 
and Page Auditorium Box Office. Duke student general 
admission tickets are $2.50 each. 

MUSIC FACULTY SERIES 
BETTY BULLOCK TALBOT, PIANIST 

The Department of Music presents Mrs. Betty Bullock 
Talbot, pianist, in the first performance of the 1968-69 
Faculty Series Recitals. Mrs. Talbot, a new member of the 
faculty this year, will perform Saturday, November 23rd, at 
8:15 p.m. in the Music Room, East Duke Building. Her 
program is as follows: Overture in the French Manner— J. S. 
Bach; Sonata IV in F-sharp Major, Op.30— Scriabine; 



INTERMISSION; The Perilous Night-John Cage; Sonata in 
F-sharp Major, Op. 78— Beethoven; Fantasie quasi sonata: 
Apres une lecture du Dante— Liszt. 

S.U. MAJOR SPEAKERS SERIES 
MRS. JEANE DIXON 

The Student Union Major Speakers Series will present 
Mrs. Jeane Dixon in an open lecture on Sunday evening, 
November 24th, in Baldwin Auditorium at 8:00 p.m. Mrs. 
Dixon has been much publicized for her ability to predict 
future events and was the subject of Ruth Montgomery's 
book,A Gift of Prophecy. 

SUMMER 1969 
EUROPEAN GROUP FLIGHTS 

For the eighth consecutive year, the Student Activities 
Office 202-A Flowers Building, is offering Duke European 
Group Fare Flights to members of the Duke University 
Community (faculty, staff, students, and employees). The 
Activities Office will provide tickets only for economy class 
jet air transportation. All other arrangements are the 
responsibility of the individual. 

All faculty, staff, students, and employees of Duke 
University are eligible who have been associated with Duke 
for six months prior to departure times. 
Dates... 

Flight 1 (Wash.,) Pan Am June 9 (Paris) Pan Am Aug. 26 
Flight 2 (NYC) Air India June 9(London) ir India Aug. 28 
Flight 3 (NYC) Air India June 10 (Lon.) Air India July 14 
Flight 4 (NYC) Pan Am July 23 (London) Pan Am Aug. 27 
Flight numbers and times to be announced later. 
For further information call the Student Activities 
Office 684-2911 or write Box KM, Duke Station, Durham, 
N. C. 



Fares... 



Minimum of 25 Persons 



NYC to London 

Adult $300.00 

Child (12 & over).... 300.00 

Child (2-11) 150.00 

Child (under 2) 30.00 



Washington to Paris 

Adult $363.80 

Child (12 & over) ...363.80 

Child (2-11) 181.90 

Child (under 2) 36.40 



Minimum of 50 persons 
NYC to London Washington to Paris 

Adult $245.00 Adult $297.80 

Child (12 & over) ...245.00 Child (12 & over) ...297.80 

Child (2-11) 122.50 Child (2-11) 148.90 

Child (under 12) 24.50 Child (under 2) 29.80 

(All fares are effective as of 1 April 1968) 
Child's fare is based on age 
on date of flight 
departure. No deposit 
required for children 
under 12. 

Application forms are available at the Flowers 
Information Desk and Room 207 Flowers Building. For 
further information call the Student Activities Office 
684-2911 or write Box KM, Duke Station, Durham, N. C. 



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DUKE UNIVERSITY LIBRARY SCHEDULE 
THANKSGIVING 1968 

Perkins Library 

Wednesday, November 27 8:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. 
Thursday, November 28 Closed 
Friday, November 29 8:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. 
Saturday, November 30 8:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. 
Sunday, December 1 

(Graduate and Undergraduate Rooms only) 
p.m.-ll:00 p.m. 

Woman's College Library 

Wednesday, November 27 8:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. 
Thursday, November 28 Closed 
Friday, November 29 9:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. 
Saturday, November 30 9:00 a.m.-l:00 p.m. 
Sunday, December 1 Closed 



2:00 



DUKE ARTIST SERIES CHANGE 

The Artists Series Committee regretfully announces that 
the Chamber Symphony of Philadelphia Concert scheduled 
for the evening of Wednesday, November 20, 1968 has been 
cancelled. The Chamber Symphony has just filed 
bankruptcy proceedings and is unable to fulfill any 
engagements after November 1. Negotiations are now in 
process to schedule a comparable attraction at a later date 
to replace the Chamber Symphony. Announcement of this 
replacement will be made as soon as the negotiations are 
completed. 



CALENDAR CHANGE 

The Ciompi Quartet Recital, originally scheduled for 
November 1st, will be presented on Tuesday, November 
26th at 8:15 p.m. in the Music Room, East Duke Building. 



November 15, 1968 Number 10 

Published by Duke University Student Activities 
Department each week when school is in session. 
Subscriptions: $2.50 per year. Address inquiries to Box 
KM, Duke Station, Durham, North Carolina 27706. 
Application to mail at second class postage rates is pending 
at Durham, North Carolina. 



IMPORTANT— Notices for the Duke University Calendar 
should be submitted IN WRITTEN FORM to Room 207 
Flowers Building, West Campus not later than 5:00 p.m., 
Tuesday. Extension 2911. 



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Duke University 

CALENDAR 







Nov. 24-Dec. 1, 1968 



Sunday, November 24 

10:30-10:45 a.m. Carillon Recital. Mr. J. Samuel 
Hammond, University Carillonneur. 

11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship. University 
Chapel. Preacher: The Reverend Dr. McMurry S. 
Richey, Professor of Theology and Christian 
Nurture. Sermon: "The Bias of Gratitude." 
Broadcast over Radio Station WDNC and 
WDNC-FM. 

11:25 a.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Challenges in 
Education." WCHL Chapel Hill. Dr. Rebecca 
Buckley will discuss "Defects in Immunity." 

4:00-6:00 p.m. International Open House. 2022 Campus 
Drive. 

7:00 and 9:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page Auditorium. 
"PERSONA" with Bibi Andersson and Liv Ullmann. 
"Director Ingmar Bergman studies search for 
identity and self-fulfillment through intense, strange, 
intimately photographed story of two women. An 
actress retreats into silence, her nurse pours out her 
own life story, physical attachment grows and 
eventually there is an emotional exchange of 
identity. Beautifully acted, engrossing..."— Cue. 

7:30 p.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Challenges in 
Education." WPTF Raleigh. Dr. D. R. Fowler will 
discuss "The Alcoholic as a Patient." 



Monday, November 25 



9:30-11:00 a.m. WSGA Lounge Open. Lobby, East Campus 

Union. 
2:15 p.m. The final examination of Mr. J. B. Hilmon for the 

Ph.D. degree in Botany. Room 140 Biological 

Sciences Building. 
4:15 p.m. Zoology Seminar. Room 111 Biological Sciences 

Building. Speaker: Dr. I. E. Gray. 
4:15-5:30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 

faculty, staff members, and students. 
7:00 p.m. International Folk Dancing. The Ark, East 

Campus. 
7:00-8:30 p.m. Arts and Crafts Painting Workshop 

Demonstration: Mr. W.K. Stars. Room 109 Bivins 

(Art Building). 
8:15 p.m. Special Lecture in Early Christian History: The 

Reverend Professor George Dunbar Kilpatrick. Karl 

Zener Auditorium, Psychology— Sociology Building. 
8:30 p.m. S.F.A.C. Open Meeting. Room 101 Union 

Building. 



Tuesday, November 26 

9:30-11:00 a.m. WSGA Lounge Open. Lobby, East Campus 

Union. 
10:00 a.m. Divinity School Chapel Service. University 

Chapel. Speaker: Dr. Richard Goodling. Reader: Mr. 

Robert Leeds. 
4:00 p.m. Forest Ecology Seminar. Room 130 Biological 

Sciences Building. Speaker: Dr. L. C. Saylor. 
4:15-5:30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 

faculty, staff members, and students. 
7:30-10:00 p.m. Scottish Country Dancing. Presbyterian 

Student Center. 
8:00 p.m. Korkes Memorial Lecture: Professor Sol 

Spiegel man. Auditorium, Biological Sciences 

Building. 
8:15 p.m. Fall Recital: Ciompi String Quartet. Music 

Room, East Duke Building. 

Wednesday, November 27 

9:30-11:00 a.m. WSGA Lounge Open. Lobby, East Campus 

Union. 
10:00 a.m. Divinity School Chapel. University Chapel. 

Speaker: Dr. Richard Goodling. Reader: Mr. Cam 

Coltharp. 
12:30 p.m. Thanksgiving Recess Begins. 
1:00 p.m. The final examination of Mr. Larry Wayne Cook 

for the Ph.D. degree in English. Room 328 Allen 

Building. 
7:00-8:30 p.m. Chapel Choir Rehearsal. University Chapel. 

Thursday, November 28 

THANKSGIVING DAY. 

Friday, November 29 

THANKSGIVING RECESS 

Saturday, November 30 

9:55 a.m. Duke University Radio Program "Challenges in 
Education." WDNC Durham. Dr. Rebecca Buckley 
will discuss "Defects in Immunity." 

8:00 p.m. Basketball: Duke vs. V.P.I. Greensboro. 



Sunday, December 1 



10:30-10:45 a.m. Carillon Recital. M. J. Samuel Hammond, 

University Carillonneur. 
11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship. University 

Chapel. Preacher: The Reverend Dr. Frederick 

Herzog, Professor of Systematic Theology. 

Broadcast over Radio Station WDNC and 

WDNC-FM. 
11:25 a.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Challenges in 

Education." WCHL Chapel Hill. Dr. Howard Clark 

will discuss "The Engineer's Role in Medicine." 
4:00-6:00 p.m. International Open House. 2022 Campus 

Drive. 
7:30 p.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Challenges in 

Education." WPTF Raleigh. Dr. Frank W. Woods 

will discuss "Forestry Research in Ecuador." 

UNIVERSITY SERVICE OF WORSHIP 

The Reverend Dr. McMurry S. Richey, Professor of 
Theology and Christian Nurture, will deliver the sermon at 
the University Service of Worship on Sunday, November 
24th, at 11:00 a.m. in the University Chapel. The sermon 
topic is "The Bias of Gratitude." 

RELIGIOUS ORGANIZATIONS 
ANNOUNCEMENTS 

UCM. 5:30 p.m. Sunday, November 24th. Supper and 
Discussion. Episcopal Student Center. Topic: Discussion of 
Michael Novak's "Human First, Christian Second." Also 
Celebration of the Rejoice Mass with the "Jazz Journey 
Men" combo. 

UCCF and WESTMINSTER FELLOWSHIP (UCM). 5:30 
p.m. Sunday, November 24th. Rides leaves East Campus 
Circle for the Harry Partin home, 2739 Spencer Street. 
Snack supper and discussion with Dr. Partin of "Demonic 
Power: Faust and Modern Man." 

EPISCOPAL CENTER (UCM). 8:00 a.m. Sunday, 
November 24th. Holy Communion. 
9:15 a.m. Choral Eucharist and sermon. 

UNIT ARIAN-UNI VERS ALIST FELLOWSHIP. 10:30 
a.m. Sunday, November 24th. Meeting, Allied Arts 
Building, 810 Proctor Street. Speaker: Dr. George Gove. 
Topic: "Modern Music in Worship." 

CATHOLIC. 9:30 a.m. Sunday, November 24th. Mass, 
Room 130 Psychology- Sociology Building. Confession 
before Mass from 9:00-9:25 a.m. Room 144 Psychology- 
Sociology Building. 

12:40 p.m. Monday— Friday, Daily Mass. Room 208 
Flowers Building. 

SOCIETY OF FRIENDS (QUAKERS). 10:30 a.m. 
Sunday, November 24th. Worship. 

11:30 a.m. Sunday, November 24th. Meeting. 404 
Alexander Avenue. 



BAHAT FAITH. 6:00 p.m. Sunday, November 24th. 
Prayer and meditation. 

6:30 p.m. Meeting: Slide presentation of scenes of Spain, 
Greece, Switzerland, and Israel and discussion of "Mount 
Carmel— Its Significance for the Future." 804 Price Avenue. 

HILLEL. 5:00 p.m. Sunday, November 24th. Weekly 
supper, Oak Room. 
7:00 p.m. Every Monday. Folk Dancing, The Ark. 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. J. B. Hilmon for the Ph.D. 
degree in Botany will be held on Monday, November 25th 
at 2:15 p.m. in Room 140 Biological Sciences Building. The 
subject of Mr. Hilmon's dissertation is "Autecology of Saw 
Palmetto (Serenoa Repens (Bartr.) Small)." 

The committee to conduct the examination consists of 
Professors W. D. Billings, P. J. Kramer, R. L. Wilbur, and 
C.W. Ralston. 

Professor Billings will preside. 



ZOOLOGY SEMINAR 

The Department of Zoology will hold its weekly seminar 
on Monday, November 25th, at 4:15 p.m. in Room 111 
Biological Sciences Building. Dr. I. E. Gray, Professor 
Emeritus of Zoology at Duke University, will speak on 
"The Distribution of Marine Animals in Relation to 
Currents." 

A graduate of the universities of Massachusetts and 
Wisconsin, Dr. Gray taught at DePauw, Wisconsin and 
Tulane before coming to Duke in 1930. At Duke he served 
for sixteen years as Chairman of the Zoology Department, 
played a major role in developing the Marine Laboratory, 
and conducted a long series of investigations in the biology 
of fish, amphibia, insects and crabs before beginning the 
program in benthic ecology he will discuss in this seminar. 

Coffee and tea will be served in the foyer at 4:00 p.m. 



ARTS AND CRAFTS WORKSHOP 

The Duke Arts and Crafts Workshop will continue with 
its series of painting demonstrations on Monday, November 
25th, from 7:00-8:30 p.m. in Room 109 Bivins (Art 
Building). Mr. W. K. Stars, the general director of the 
workshop, will follow up his previous lecture and 
demonstration of watercolor techniques with a 
demonstration of related painting mediums including egg 
yolk dye paints. 

The Arts and Crafts Workshop sponsors weekly painting 
demonstrations and critiques from 7:00—8:30 p.m. on 
Mondays, and makes the basement of the Ark available 
from 6:00—8:00 p.m. Tuesday— Friday for independent 
studio work and experimentation. The workshop painting 
demonstrations and studio sessions are open to all members 
of the Duke Community. 



SPECIAL LECTURE 
EARLY CHRISTIAN HISTORY 

The Dean Ireland's Professor of the Exegesis of Holy 
Scripture in Oxford University, the Reverend Professor 
George Dunbar Kilpatrick, will present a public lecture on 
"Jews and Christians in Roman Egypt" at 8:15 p.m. 
Monday, November 25th, in the Karl Zener Auditorium, 
Psychology— Sociology Building. His visit is sponsored 
jointly by the Dean of the Chapel, the Department of 
Religion, and the Divinity School. 

Noted editor and translator of the Greek New 
Testament, Professor Kilpatrick is a Fellow of Queen's 
College, Oxford, and University College, London. A 
member of the team of scholars who translated the New 
English Bible, his principal books include "The Origins of 
the Gospel According to St. Matthew," "The Trial of 
Jesus," and most recently, "Remaking the Liturgy." He is 
distinguished for his work on the text of the Greek New 
Testament and the earliest history of the church. 



S.F.A.C. OPEN MEETING 

In order to sample University opinion concerning the 
present Pickets and Protest Regulations, Committee No. 1 
of the Student-Faculty-Administration Council is holding 
an open hearing on this subject with suggestions for 
possible changes. This session, which will be held on 
Monday, November 25th, at 8:30 p.m. in Room 101 Union 
Building, is open to the entire University Community. 



FOREST ECOLOGY SEMINAR 

Dr. L. C. Saylor, Assistant to the Dean and Professor at 
the School of Forest Resources, North Carolina State 
University, will present a talk at the Forest Ecology 
Seminar on "Introgressive Hybridization of Pines." The 
seminar will be held on Tuesday, November 26th, at 4:00 
p.m. in Room 130 Biological Sciences Building. 



KORKES MEMORIAL LECTURE 
PROFESSOR SOL SPIEGELMAN 

The twelfth Korkes Memorial Lecture will be given by 
Professor Sol Spiegelman of the Microbiology Department, 
University of Illinois, Tuesday, November 26th, at 8:00 
p.m. in the Auditorium, Biological Sciences Building. His 
topic will be "In Vitro Studies on a Replicating Molecule." 
Professor Spiegelman has made many contributions to the 
study of genetic mechanisms at the molecular level, and in 
the past few years has directed his attention to the 
mechanism of replication of RNA— containing bacterial 
viruses. In the course of this work, he achieved the first test 
tube synthesis of an infectious nucleic acid molecule, 
capable of causing cells to make viruses. Undergraduates, 
graduates and all others in the University Community with 
an interest in the subject of heredity are urged to attend. 

FALL RECITAL 
CIOMPI STRING QUARTET 

The Ciompi String Quartet will present a recital on 
Tuesday, November 26th, in the Music Room, East Duke 
Building, at 8:15 p.m. The Quartet, whose distinguished 
artists are members of the Department of Music at Duke 



University, has performed widely in the Eastern region and 
continues to build its reputation as an outstanding string 
ensemble. The members are Giorgio Ciompi, violin; Arlene 
di Cecco, violin; Julia Mueller, viola; and Luca di Cecco, 
cello. The public is cordially invited and there will be no 
admission charge. 

The program follows: 
Quartet in E Minor, Opus 59, No. 2 Beethoven 

Five Pieces for String Quartet, Opus 5 Anton Webem 

Quartet in E-flat, Opus 51 Dvorak 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. Larry Wayne Cook for the 
Ph.D. degree in English will be held on Wednesday, 
November 27th at 1:00 p.m. in Room 328 Allen Building. 
The subject of Mr. Cook's dissertation is "Narrators In The 
Works of Nathaniel Hawthorne." 

The committee to conduct the examination consists of 
Professors Ariin Turner, Louis Budd, Buford Jones, and 
Thomas Cordle. 

Professor Arlin Turner will preside. 



ETS GRADUATE SCHOOL 
FOREIGN LANGUAGE TESTS 

Registration is now open for the ETS Graduate School 
Foreign Language Tests in French, German, Russian, and 
Spanish to be administered on February 15th, 1969. 
Register at the University Counseling Center, Room 309 
Flowers Building. Registration fee is $8.00, payable by 
check, money order, or Bursar's Office cash receipt. Cash 
can not be accepted. DEADLINE for registration is January 
8th, 1969. 

PLEASE NOTE: ETS originally scheduled this test for 
February 1st, as announced in the Graduate School 
Bulletin, but it has been changed to February 15th. 

1968-69 RECESS AND 
EXAMINATION PERIODS 

Thanksgiving Recess 

12:30 p.m. Wednesday, November 27—8:10 a.m. Monday, 
December 2, 1968. 

Christmas Recess 

12:30 p.m. Saturday, December 21, 1968-8:10 a.m. 
Monday, January 6, 1969. 

1st Semester Examination Period 

Wednesday, January 15— Friday, January 24, 1969. 

Semester Break 

Saturday, January 25— Wednesday, January 29, 1969. 

Spring Recess 

12:30 p.m. Saturday, March 22-8:10 a.m. Monday, March 
31, 1969. 

2nd Semester Examination Period 
Monday, May 19— Wednesday, May 28, 1969. 

Commencement 
Saturday, May 31— Monday, June 2, 1969. 



DUKE UNIVERSITY DINING HALLS 
THANKSGIVING SCHEDULE 

The Oak Room will close after lunch on Wednesday, November 27, 1968, and open for the traditional Thanksgiving 
Dinner from 12:00 to 2:00 p.m. and from 4:30 to 7:00 p.m. on Thursday, November 28, 1968. It will then close until lunch 
on Monday, December 2, 1968. 



Blue and White Room 
University Room 
Oak Room 



University Room 
Oak Room 



Wednesday, November 27, 1968 

Breakfast Snack Bar 

7:00 - 9:30 9:30 - 11:00 



Thursday, November 28, 1968 



8:30 - 11:00 



Luncheon 
11:30 - 2:00 
11:00 - 1:30 
11:30 - 2:00 



11:30 - 2:00 
12:00 - 2:00 



Dinner 

Closed 
5:00 - 6:00 



Closed 
4:30 - 7:00 



University Room 



Friday and Saturday, November 29,30, 1968 

7:30 - 9:30 9:30 - 11:00 11:30 - 1:30 5:00 - 6:30 



University Room 
Blue and White Room 



Sunday, December 1, 1968 
8:30 - 11:00 



11:30 - 1:30 



5:00 - 7:00 



The price for the Oak Room dinner is $2.50 for adults and $1.50 for children. 



SUMMER 1969 
EUROPEAN GROUP FLIGHTS 

For the eighth consecutive year, the Student Activities 
Office 202-A Flowers Building, is offering Duke European 
Group Fare Flights to members of the Duke University 
Community (faculty, staff, students, and employees). The 
Activities Office will provide tickets only for economy class 
jet air transportation. All other arrangements are the 
responsibility of the individual. 

All faculty, staff, students, and employees of Duke 
University are eligible who have been associated with Duke 
for six months prior to departure times. 
Dates... 

Flight 1 (Wash.,) Pan Am June 9 (Paris) Pan Am Aug. 26 
Flight 2 (NYC) Air India June 9( London) ir India Aug. 28 
Flight 3 (NYC) Air India June 10 (Lon.) Air India July 14 
Flight 4 (NYC) Pan Am July 23 (London) Pan Am Aug. 27 
Flight numbers and times to be announced later. 
For further information call the Student Activities 
Office 684-2911 or write Box KM, Duke Station, Durham, 
N. C. 

Fares... 

Minimum of 25 Persons 
NYC to London Washington to Paris 



Adult $300.00 

Child (12 & over)....300.00 

Child (2-11) 150.00 

Child (under 2) 30.00 



Adult $363.80 

Child (12 & over) ...363.80 

Child (2-11) 181.90 

Child (under 2) 36.40 



Child's fare is based on age on date of flight departure. 
No deposit required for children under 12. 



Minimum of 50 persons 
NYC to London Washington to Paris 

Adult $245.00 Adult $297.80 

Child (12 & over) ...245.00 Child (12 & over) ...297.80 

Child (2-11) 122.50 Child (2-11) 148.90 

Child (under 12) 24.50 Child (under 2) 29.80 

(All fares are effective as of 1 April 1968) 

Application forms are available at the Flowers 
Information Desk and Room 207 Flowers Building. For 
further information call the Student Activities Office 
684-2911 or write Box KM, Duke Station, Durham, N. C. 



DUKE UNIVERSITY LIBRARY SCHEDULE 
THANKSGIVING 1968 

Perkins Library 

Wednesday, November 27 8:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. 
Thursday, November 28 Closed 
Friday, November 29 8:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. 
Saturday, November 30 8:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. 
Sunday, December 1 

(Graduate and Undergraduate Rooms only) 2:00 
p.m.-ll:00 p.m. 

Woman's College Library 

Wednesday, November 27 8:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. 
Thursday, November 28 Closed 
Friday, November 29 9:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. 
Saturday, November 30 9:00 a.m.-l:00 p.m. 
Sunday, December 1 Closed 



DECEMBER ACTIVITIES 

Monday, December 2 

8:10 a.m. Classes are resumed. 

8:00 p.m. Basketball: Duke vs. Alabama, Indoor Stadium. 

Tuesday, December 3 

8:15 p.m. Music Department Faculty Series: Loren Withers, 
Pianist. Page Auditorium. 

Wednesday, December 4 

7:30 p.m. Department of Romance Languages Film: "Dona 
Barbara." Auditorium, Biological Sciences Building. 

Thursday, December 5 

7:30 p.m. Phi Beta Kappa Initiation. Union Ballroom. 

Friday, December 6 

8:00 p.m. S.U. Cinematic Arts Committee Film Series: 
"Mother" and "Relativity." Auditorium, Biological 
Sciences Building. 

8:15 p.m. Duke University Concert Band Performance. 
Page Auditorium. 

Saturday, December 7 

7:00 and 9:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page Auditorium. 

"Umbrellas of Cherbourg." 

8:00 p.m. Basketball: Duke vs. Princeton. Princeton, New 

Jersey. 

8:15 p.m. The Chamber Arts Society: Hungarian String 

Quartet. Music Room, East Duke Building. 

9:00 p.m.— 1:00 a.m. Coed Ball. University Ballroom, Jack 

Tar Hotel. 

Sunday, December 8 

Founders Day 

4:00 p.m. Duke University Chapel Choir presents "The 

Messiah." University Chapel. 

7:00 and 9:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page Auditorium. 

"Umbrellas of Cherbourg." 

Monday, December 9 

3:00—6:00 p.m. Graduation for Physical Therapy Students. 
Blair House. 

8:00 p.m. Basketball: Duke vs. University of Michigan. 
Indoor Stadium. 

Tuesday, December 10 

8:00 p.m. Duke University Chapel Choir presents "The 
Messiah." University Chapel. 

Wednesday, December 11 

7:00 p.m. Delta Mu Tau Christmas Banquet. Ranch House, 

Chapel Hill. 

8:00 p.m. School of Nursing Choral Communion. Hospital 

Amphitheater. 

8:00 p.m. Basketball: Duke vs. University of Virginia. 

Lexington, Virginia. 



Thursday, December 12 

9:30—11:30 a.m. Newcomer's Club: Service Project. 
Visiting Salvation Army Home, Tour and Service, 
Needlework Guild. 

8: 15 p.m. Duke Players Performance: 'Arms and the Man." 
George Bernard Shaw. Branson Hall. 

Friday, December 13 

8:00 p.m. S.U. Cinematic Arts Committee Film Series: 
"Diary of a Country Priest" and "Mass for Dakota Sioux." 
Auditorium, Biological Sciences Building. 
8:15 p.m. Duke Players Performance: "Arms and the Man." 
George Bernard Shaw. Branson Hall. 

8:15 p.m. Durham Civic Choral Society Concert. Page 
Auditorium. 

Saturday, December 14 

7:00 and 9:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page Auditorium. 
"The Comedians." 

8: 15 p.m. Duke Players Performance: 'Arms and the Man." 
George Bernard Shaw. Branson Hall. 

Sunday, December 15 

7:00 and 9:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page Auditorium. 
"The Comedians." 

8:00 p.m. Chancel Singers: "Christmas in Words and 
Music." University Chapel. 

Monday, December 16 

4:00 p.m. Music Department and Divinity School present 

"Amahl and the Night Visitors." University Chapel. 

8:00 p.m. Basketball: Duke vs. Clemson. Indoor Stadium. 

Tuesday, December 17 
8:15 p.m. Madrigal Singers Christmas Concert. Music 
Room, East Duke Building. 

Wednesday, December 18 

3:00 p.m. S.U. Performing Arts: Childrens' Matinee: 
Performance of "The Nutcracker Ballet" by the Dance 
Department of The North Carolina School of the Arts. Page 
Auditorium. 

5:30 p.m. WSGA Christmas Dinner. Union, East Campus. 
Followed by reading of "The Christmas Carol" by Dr. 
Douglas M. Knight. Music Room, East Duke Building. 
8:15 p.m. S.U. Performing Arts: Performance of "The 
Nutcracker Ballet" by the Dance Department of The North 
Carolina School of the Arts. Page Auditorium. 

Thursday, December 19 

Friday, December 20 

Saturday, December 21 

12:30 p.m. Christmas recess begins. 

2:00 p.m. Basketball. Duke vs. Wake Forest. Greensboro. 

(televised). 



November 22, 1968 



Number 11 



Published by Duke University Student Activities Department each week when school 
is in session. Subscriptions: $2.50 per year. Address inquiries to Box KM, Duke Station, 
Durham, North Carolina 27706. Application to mail at second class postage rates is 
pending at Durham, North Carolina. 



IMPORTANT— Notices for the Duke University Calendar should be submitted IN 
WRITTEN FORM to Room 207 Flowers Building, West Campus not later than 5:00 p.m., 
Tuesday. Extension 2911. 



Dec. 1-8, 1968 



Sunday, December 1 



10:30-10:45 a.m. Carillon Recital. Mr. J. Samuel 

Hammond, University Carillonneur. 
11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship. University 

Chapel. Preacher: The Reverend Dr. Frederick Herzog, 

Professor of Systematic Theology. Sermon: "The 

Unimagined." Broadcast over Radio Station WDNC 

and WDNC-FM. 
11:25 a.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Challenges in 

Education." WCHL Chapel Hill. Dr. Howard Clark will 

discuss "The Engineer's Role in Medicine." 
4:00-6:00 p.m. International Open House. 2022 Campus 

Drive. 
7:30 p.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Challenges in 

Education." WPTF Raleigh. Dr. Frank W. Woods will 

discuss "Forestry Research in Ecuador." 

Monday, December 2 

8:10 a.m. Classes are resumed. 

9:30-11:00 a.m. WSGA Lounge Open. Lobby, East 

Campus Union. 
4:15 p.m. Zoology Seminar. Room 111 Biological Sciences 

Building. Speaker: Dr. Roderick A. Suthers. 
4:15-5:30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 

faculty, staff members, and students. 
5:15 p.m. Faculty Volleyball. Card Gymnasium. 
6:00 p.m. Freshman Basketball: Duke vs. East Carolina. 

Indoor Stadium. 
6:30-8:00 p.m. Arts and Crafts Workshop: Painting 

Critique by Joseph Cox. Room 109 Art Building. 
7:00 p.m. International Folk Dancing. The Ark, East 

Campus. 
8:00 p.m. Basketball: Duke vs. Alabama. Indoor Stadium. 
8:15 p.m. Erasmus Club Meeting. Green Room, East Duke 

Building. Speaker: Mr. Paul Meyvaert. 

Tuesday, December 3 



Lounge Open. Lobby, East 



9:30-11:00 a.m. WSGA 

Campus Union. 
10:00 a.m. Divinity 

Chapel. Speaker: 
2:30 p.m. The final 

Lichter for the 

Physics Building. 
4:00 p.m. Gerontology Seminar. Room 1504 Gerontology 

Building, Duke Hospital. Speaker: Mrs. Marie C. 

McGuire. 



School Chapel Service. University 
Dr. Wright Spears. 

examination of Mr. James Joseph 
Ph.D. degree in Physics. Room 140 



4:00 p.m. Forest Ecology Seminar. Room 130 Biological 

Sciences Building. Speaker: Mr. Luis Barreto. 
4:15-5:30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 

faculty, staff members, and students. 
7:30-10:00 p.m. Scottish Country Dancing. Presbyterian 

Student Center. 
8:15 p.m. Music Faculty Series: Loren Withers, Pianist. 

Page Auditorium. 



Wednesday, December 4 



9:30-11:00 a.m. WSGA Lounge Open. Lobby, East 

Campus Union. 
10:00 a.m. Divinity School Chapel, University Chapel. 

Speaker: Dean Robert E. Cushman. 
4:15-5:30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 

faculty, staff members, and students. 
7:00-8:30 p.m. Chapel Choir Rehearsal. University Chapel. 
7:00-9:00 p.m. Open House Badminton for all men and 

women: faculty and students. East Campus 

Gymnasium. 
7:30 p.m. Department of Romance Languages Film: 

"Dona Barbara." Auditorium, Biological Sciences 

Building. 



Thursday, December 5 



9:30-11:00 a.m. WSGA Lounge Open. Lobby, East 

Campus Union. 
10:00 a.m. Divinity School Chapel. University Chapel. 

Speaker: Dean Robert E. Cushman. 
4:15-5:30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 

Faculty, staff members, and students. 
5:00 p.m. Dean's Hour: Dr. Harry H. Gordon. Hospital 

Amphitheater. 
5:15 p.m. Faculty Volleyball. Card Gymnasium. 
7:30 p.m. Phi Beta Kappa Fall Initiation. Union Ballroom, 

West Campus. 
7:45 p.m. Bench and Bar Meeting. Room 139 Social 

Science Building. Speaker: Hyman Gross. 
8:15-9:30 p.m. West Campus Swimming Pool open to 

faculty members and their families. Faculty children 

will be admitted only when accompanied by their 

parents. 



Friday, December 6 



9:30-11:00 a.m. WSGA Lounge Open. Lobby, East 
Campus Union. 

10:00 a.m. Divinity School Chapel Service. University 
Chapel. Speaker: Dean Robert E. Cushman. 

12:30 p.m. Plant Ecology Seminar. Room 144 Biological 
Sciences Building. Speaker: Mr. Robin Foster. 

4:15-5:00 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. Faculty 
daughters, ages 6 to 16, may also swim; those 10 and 
under must be accompanied by their mothers. 

7:00-9:00 p.m. Open House Badminton for all men and 
women: faculty and students. East Campus 
Gymnasium. 

8:00 p.m. S.U. Cinematic Arts Film Series: "MOTHER" 
directed by Pudovkin. The Russian government 
commissioned the two top directors of the silent era to 
make films commemorating the abortive uprising of 
1905. The resulting works are two of the world's best 
films— Eisenstein's "Potemkin" and Pudovkin's 
"Mother." "Mother" is the best example of Pudovkin's 
style and well-known use of "plastic material." 
"Mother" is a sensitive, tender film showing the basic 
problems of the Russian people as they planned the 
revolution. "It is impossible to describe the emotional 
effect of this film. Without hesitation, I place it 
amongst the finest works in the history of the cinema." 
"RELATIVITY" directed by Emsehwiller. A 
remarkable epic of man's search for the meaning of 
existence. "'Relativity' is a beautifully photographed 
color montage of shots, of shots, insect, animal, man, 
and galaxy, a sobering antidote to the orgy of 
subjectivism going on elsewhere." 

8:15 p.m. Duke University Concert Band Performance. 
Page Auditorium. 



Saturday, December 7 



9:55 a.m. Duke University Radio Program "Challenges in 
Education." WDNC Durham. Dr. Howard Clark will 
discuss "The Engineer's Role in Medicine." 

3:00-5:00 p.m. East Campus Gymnasium: Open to 
students, faculty, and staff for recreation (swimming, 
badminton, volleyball, basketball, table tennis). 

3:30 p.m. Basketball: Duke vs. Princeton. Princeton, New 
Jersey. 7:10 and 9:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page 
Auditorium. "THE UMBRELLAS OF CHERBOURG" 
(French). Grand Prize Winner at Cannes. "I've been 
trying in vain to think of someone flinty enough to 
resist the manifold seductions of "The Umbrellas of 
Cherbourg," a tale of young love told entirely in song 
against a background of colors that might have been 
plundered from the palette of some gifted 
child!"-New Yorker. "A triumph of taste, spirit and 
style.. .Splashy, sparkling French musical delights the 
eye.. .A film of unique and haunting beauty!"— Time 
Magazine. 



8:15 p.m. The Chamber Arts Society: Hungarian String 
Quartet. Music Room, East Duke Building. 

9:00 p.m.-l:00 a.m. Coed Ball. University Ballroom, Jack 
Tar Hotel. 



Sunday, December 8 



10:30-10:45 a.m. Carillon Recital. Mr. J. Samuel 

Hammond, University Carillonneur. 
11:00 am. University Service of Worship. University 

Chapel. Preacher: The Reverend Professor James T. 

Cleland, Dean of the Chapel. Broadcast over Radio 

Station WDNC and WDNC-FM. 
11:25 a.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Challenges in 

Education." WCHL Chapel Hill. Miss Nina Kamlukin 

will discuss "An International Exchange Program." 
4:00-6:00 p.m. International Open House. 2022 Campus 

Drive. 
4:00 p.m. Duke Chapel Choir presents "The Messiah." 

University Chapel. 
7:10 and 9:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page Auditorium. 

"THE UMBRELLAS OF CHERBOURG" (French). 

Grand Prize Winner at Cannes. 
7:30 p.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Challenges in 

Education." WPTF Raleigh. Mr. Ashbel Brice will 

discuss "About a University Press." 



UNIVERSITY SERVICE OF WORSHIP 
The Reverend Dr. Frederick Herzog, Professor of 
Systematic Theology, will deliver the sermon at the 
University Service of Worship on Sunday, December 1st, at 
11:00 a.m. in the University Chapel. The sermon topic is 
"The Unimagined" and the scripture will be taken from I 
Corinthians 2:1-10. Special music for the service will come 
from Handel's "Messiah" with Mr. Richard Martin as bass 
soloist with the Chapel Choir. The carillonneur and organist 
for the service will be Mr. J. Samual Hammond. He will 
play for the opening voluntary two chorale preludes, "Vom 
Himmel Hoch" and "Wie schon leuchtet der Morgenstern" 
by William Klenz and for the closing voluntary, "Komm 
heilger Geist" by Hermann Schroeder. As always, the public 
is cordially invited to this service. 



RELIGIOUS ORGANIZATIONS 
ANNOUNCEMENTS 



UNITARIAN-UNIVERSALIST FELLOWSHIP. 10:30 
a.m. Sunday, December 1st. Rev. Arthur Olson will speak 
on "Where Unitarians and Universalists Departed from 
Traditional Christianity." Carolina Friends School. 
10:30 a.m. Sunday, December 8th. Professor James Hunt 
of Shaw University will speak on "What Black Power Means 
in Terms of Black and White Cooperation." Carolina 
Friends School. (Follow signs on Erwin Road and Mt. Sinai 
Road. For transportation or further information call one of 
the following numbers between 9:30 and 10:00 a.m.: 
286-9702, 489-3992, 489-4600). 



EPISCOPAL CENTER (UCM). 5:15 p.m. Thursday, 
December 5th. Holy Communion. 

UCCF and WESTMINSTER FELLOWSHIP (UCM). 5:45 
p.m. Friday, December 6th. Dinner, worship, and 
discussion. Westminster House, Alexander Avenue. 

CATHOLIC. 9:30 a.m. Sunday, December 1st and 8th. 
Mass, Room 130 Psychology- Sociology Building. 
Confession before Mass from 9:00—9:25 a.m. Room 144 
Psychology- Sociology Building. 

12:40 p.m. Daily Mass. Monday, Wednesday, and Friday. 
Room 208 Flowers Building. Tuesday and Thursday. New 
Hospital Chapel. 

SOCIETY OF FRIENDS (QUAKERS). 10:30 a.m. 
Sunday, December 1st and 8th. Worship. 
11:30 a.m. Sunday, December 1st and 8th. Meeting. 404 
Alexander Avenue. 

HILLEL. 5:00 p.m. Sunday, December 1st and 8th. 
Weekly supper, Oak Room. 
7:00 p.m. Every Monday. Folk Dancing, The Ark. 



ZOOLOGY SEMINAR 

The Department of Zoology will hold a seminar on 
Monday, December 2nd, at 4:15 p.m. in Room 111 
Biological Sciences Building. Dr. Roderick A. Suthers, 
Assistant Professor at Indiana University will speak on "The 
Sensory Ecology of Echolocation." 

Dr. Suthers follows the physiology of bats and birds 
alike; he has investigated orientation in birds and 
echolocation in fish-eating bats and has recently been 
looking into visual navigation in bats and the respiratory 
correlates of high altitude bird flight. Dr. Suthers' interests 
are perhaps best described as "experimental natural 
history," to use Griffin's felicitous phrase, "the attempt to 
bring modern analytical methods to bear on the basic 
problems of understanding animal life and natural 
conditions." 

Coffee and tea will be served in the foyer at 4:00 p.m. 



ARTS AND CRAFTS WORKSHOP 

The final session of the fall semester Arts and Crafts 
Workshop will be held in Room 109 Art Building from 
6:30—8:00 p.m. on Monday, December 2nd. The workshop 
will consist of a painting critique by Mr. Joseph H. Cox, 
artist- teacher from the School of Design, North Carolina 
State University. 

Mr. Cox studied at the John Herron Art School in 
Indianapolis and received his Masters in Fine Arts from the 
University of Iowa. He has received wide acclaim not only 
for his paintings, but for his large murals (including a 
sculpture and light mural for the Central Carolina Bank in 
Durham), and for his creative work in stained glass, mosaic, 
aluminum, and cast stone. 

Joseph Cox will be at the Arts and Crafts workshop 
showing representative samples of his own work and leading 
a critique and group discussion for workshop participants. 
All interested members of the Duke Community are invited 
to bring paintings for discussion. 



ERASMUS CLUB MEETING 

Mr. Paul Meyvaert, Lecturer in the Department of Art, 
will speak to the Erasmus Club in the Green Room, East 
Duke Building, at 8:15 p.m. on Monday, December 2nd, on 
"St. Jerome, the Scholar: Saint or Sinner?" Mr. Meyvaert, 
who came to Duke in 1967, specializes in medieval studies. 
He currently serves as the librarian of the Department of 
Art. 

The Erasmus Club seeks to further the interest in the 
Humanities at Duke University by providing a forum for 
faculty papers from the broad area of the Humanities. A 
cordial invitation is extended to all faculty members and 
graduate students. 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. James Joseph Lichter for 
the Ph.D. degree in Physics will be held on Tuesday, 
December 3, 1968, at 2:30 p.m. in Room 140 Physics 
Building. The subject of Mr. Lichter's dissertation is 
"Electron Spin Resonance Studies Of Radiation Damage to 
a Single Crystal of Deoxyadenosine Monohydrate." The 
committee to conduct the examination consists of 
Professors Walter Gordy, Lawrence E. Evans, Hugh G. 
Robinson, and David A. Smith. Professor Walter Gordy will 
preside. 



GERONTOLOGY SEMINAR 

The Duke University Council on Aging and Human 
Development will hold an open seminar on Tuesday, 
December 3rd, at 4:00 p.m. in Room 1504 Gerontology 
Building, Duke Hospital. Mrs. Marie C. McGuire, Assistant 
for Problems of the Elderly and Handicapped, U.S. 
Department of Housing and Urban Development, will speak 
on "Trends in Living Environments for the Elderly." The 
public is invited. 



FOREST ECOLOGY SEMINAR 

On Tuesday, December 3rd, Mr. Luis Barreto, graduate 
student in the School of Forestry, will present a talk at the 
Forest Ecology Seminar on "The Distance to the Nearest 
Neighbor: a Problem in Plant Ecology." The seminar will be 
held at 4:00 p.m. in Room 130 Biological Sciences 
Building. 



MUSIC FACULTY SERIES 
LOREN WITHERS, PIANIST 

Loren Withers, Director of Piano Studies, Department of 
Music, will present a piano recital in Page Auditorium on 
Tuesday, December 3rd, at 8:15 p.m. 

Professor Withers has established a distinguished 
reputation as a performer and teacher through many solo 
recital appearances, concerto performances with symphony 
orchestras, and leadership of clinics and workshops for 
piano teachers in many states from coast to coast. Critics 
have called him "the finest pianist in the South." Following 



his recital at the National Gallery of Art, Washington critic 
Irving Lowens headlined his review with the comment 
"Withers proves pianist in the grand manner" and 
continued in his article to say "he is very good indeed." Mr. 
Withers is Past-Chairman of the Southern Division Piano 
Section, present National Chairman of Senior Piano and 
Vice-President of the Southern Division of the Music 
Teachers National Association. In 1965 he received the 
MTNA's "Teacher of the Year" award. He holds two 
patents on a piano teaching aid which has been called "a 
simple but ingenious device for teaching various touches." 

Recently he has collaborated with violinist Giorgio 
Ciompi in the Ciompi-Withers Duo which has performed 
widely in the eastern half of the country including recitals 
in New York for the Bohemians (New York Musicians 
Club) and at the Cleveland Museum of Art. The recital is 
open to the public without charge. 

The program follows: 
Two Preludes and Fugues Bach 

from "The Well Tempered Clavier" Book I 
Four Sonatas Scarlatti 

Variations and Fugue on a Theme By Handel Brahms 
Sonata No. 3, Opus 28 Prokofieff 

Ballade in F Major, Opus 38 Chopin 

Etude in C-sharp Minor, Opus 25, No. 7 Chopin 

Etude in A Minor, Opus 25, No. 11 Chopin 



SPANISH FILM 
"DONA BARBARA" 

Students and faculty interested in language, sociological 
controls, primitive superstition, and even U.S. envolvement 
in South America, will be interested in the film "Dona 
Barbara" in Spanish with English subtitles. "A major work 
in literature from Venezuela's famed Romulo Gallegos is 
brought to the screen by the talents of Maria Felix, 
Mexico's top actress in the title role. Dona Barbara is a 
beautiful, impetuous woman who rules the cattle country 
of Venezuela through superstition and violence, until one 
day her power is challenged by a strange newcomer." 

The film is being shown under the auspices of the 
Department of Romance Languages at 7:30 p.m. on 
Wednesday, December 4th, in the Auditorium of the 
Biological Sciences Building. An admission of fifty cents 
will be charged at the door. 



DEAN'S HOUR 

The Dean's Hour will be held on Thursday, December 
5th, at 5:00 p.m. in the Hospital Amphitheater. Dr. Harry 
H. Gordon, Professor of Pediatrics and Dean of Albert 
Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York, will speak 
on "Student Opinions of the Present Medical Curriculum." 



PHI BETA KAPPA FALL INITIATION 

Phi Beta Kappa will hold its annual fall initiation on 
Thursday, December 5th, at 7:30 p.m. in the Union 
Ballroom, West Campus. All members are urged to be 
present and all initiates must be present unless excused. 
Those who have a part on the program must be present at 
7:15 p.m. 



BENCH AND BAR MEETING 

Mr. Hyman Gross of the New York University Law 
School will speak at the Bench and Bar Meeting on 
Thursday, December 5th, at 7:45 p.m. in Room 139 Social 
Science Building. 



PLANT ECOLOGY SEMINAR 

Mr. Robin Foster of the Botany Department will speak 
on "The Reproductive Capacity of Plants" at the Plant 
Ecology Seminar on Friday, December 6th, at 12:30 p.m. 
in Room 144 Biological Sciences Building. 

FALL CONCERT 
DUKE UNIVERSITY CONCERT BAND 

The Duke University Concert Band, under the direction 
of Paul Bryan, will present its fall concert Friday, 
December 6th, at 8:15 p.m. in Page Auditorium. Mr. James 
Henry is associate director of the Concert Band. The 
program offers a variety of works including a composition 
by Duke graduate Phillip Rhodes and one by present Mary 
Duke Biddle scholarship student Edgar Williams. The public 
is cordially invited and no admission will be charged. 

The program follows: 
Toccata G. Frescobaldi 

Air l'ltalien Georg P. Telemann 

Featuring flutists Elizabeth Rock and Janet Steel 
Remembrance Phillip Rhodes 

Prologuee Edgar Williams 

Intermission 

Chorale Prelude: Turn Not Thy Face V. Persichetti 

Nottumo (Night Music) Louis Spohr 

Meditation Gunther Schuller 

Overture to Beatrice and Benedict Hector Berlioz 



CHAMBER ARTS SOCIETY 
HUNGARIAN STRING QUARTET 

The Chamber Arts Society will present the third concert 
of the season, to be played by the Hungarian String 
Quartet, Saturday, December 7th at 8:15 p.m. in the Music 
Room, East Duke Building. The musicians are Zoltan 
Szekeley and Michael Kuttner (violins), Denes Koromzay 
(viola), and Gabriel Magyar (cello). The program follows: 
Quartet in G minor, Opus 74, No. 3 Haydn 

Quartet No. 3, Opus 22 (1922) Hindemith 

Quartet in C sharp Minor, Opus 131 Beethoven 

Admission is by Membership Card or Guest Card. Guest 
Cards in limited number, up to the total room capacity of 
430 seats, will be available from 7:30 to 8:00 p.m. at the 
door of the Music Room before the concert. Guest Cards 
are priced at $2.50 for a single admission, and may not be 
reserved in advance except by members of the Society. 
Inquiries may be addressed to The Chamber Arts Society, 
Box 6065, College Station. 

Other chamber music concerts scheduled for this season 
include: 

Saturday, January 18th Borodin Quartet (Moscow) 

Saturday, February 8th Igor Kipnis (Harpsichord) 

Saturday, March 22nd Fine Arts Quartet 



FOUNDERS DAY CELEBRATION 

Founders Day will be celebrated on Sunday, December 
8th, at the University Service of Worship. The Reverend 
Professor James T. Cleland, Dean of the Chapel, will 
conduct the service of commemoration. At 10:45 am., 
prior to the service, the traditional wreath laying ceremony 
will take place in the Memorial Chapel. The afternoon 
program will be the presentation by the Chapel Choir of 
Handel's "Messiah" at 4:00 p.m. in the University Chapel. 
The public is cordially invited. 



DUKE CHAPEL CHOIR 

PRESENTS 

"THE MESSIAH" 

The presentation of the "Messiah" by the Duke Chapel 
Choir has been a tradition in this area for thirty-six years. 
First started in 1932 by J. Foster Barnes, until the present 
time, this rendition of Handel's celebrated oratorio has 
continued to attract thousands of people from this state 
and surrounding areas. After cancellation last year of the 
"Messiah," Professor Paul Young will again this year lead 
the 150 voice choir in the singing of this great work. 

Under the adept direction of Professor Young, who has 
directed the choir for the past twelve years, professional 
soloists and orchestra have given this performance new 
heights of excellence for both singers and audiences. 

The dates for the "Messiah" this year are Sunday, 
December 8th, at 4:00 p.m. and Tuesday, December 10th, 
at 8:00 p.m., in the Duke University Chapel. Soloists will 
be Alice Riley, Soprano, from Chicago; Doris Mayes, Mezzo 
Soprano, from Oberlin College, Oberlin, Ohio; Stanley 
Kolk, Tenor, from New York; and Adib Fazah, Bass, from 
New York. With the exception of Adib Fazah, all these 
soloists have sung with the Duke Chapel Choir. Mr. Fazah is 
a newcomer to this area and is an outstanding, established 
artist. Professor Young will conduct the orchestra and 
Giorgio Ciompi will be concertmaster. Benjamin Smith is 
visiting Choral Conductor. Organist will be Dr. Rudolph 
Kremer and James Young, Harpsichordist. 

For the convenience of those attending, free admission 
to the Chapel will be by ticket only until 15 minutes prior 
to each performance. These cards of admission may be 
secured at the Page Box Office or by sending a 
self-addressed,stamped envelope to P.O. Box KM, Duke 
Station, Durham, N.C., stating the number of tickets and 
the performance desired. An offering will be received. 



DECEMBER ACTIVITIES 
Sunday, December 1 

11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship. Chapel. Preacher: 
The Reverend Dr. Frederick Herzog. 

Monday, December 2 
8:10 a.m. Classes are resumed. 

6:00 p.m. Freshman basketball: Duke vs. East Carolina. 
Indoor Stadium. 
8:00 p.m. Basketball: Duke vs. Alabama. Indoor Stadium. 

Tuesday, December 3 

8:15 p.m. Music Faculty Series: Loren Withers, Pianist. 
Page Auditorium. No charge. 



Wednesday, December 4 

7:30 p.m. Department of Romance Languages Film: "Dona 
Barbara." Auditorium, Biological Sciences Building. 
Charge: $.50. 

Thursday, December 5 

7:30 p.m. Phi Beta Kappa Initiation. Union Ballroom. 

Friday, December 6 

8:00 p.m. S.U. Cinematic Arts Committee Film Series: 
"Mother" and "Relativity." Auditorium, Biological 
Sciences Building. Charge: $.75 at door. 
8:15 p.m. Duke University Concert Band Performance. 
Page Auditorium. No charge. 

Saturday, December 7 

7:00 and 9:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page Auditorium. 

"The Umbrellas of Cherbourg." Charge: $.75-adult; 

$.10-child. 

8:15 p.m. The Chamber Arts Society: Hungarian String 

Quartet. Music Room, East Duke Building. Charge: Season 

ticket or $2. 50 at door. 

9:00 p.m.— 1:00 a.m. Coed Ball. University Ballroom, Jack 

Tar Hotel. 

Sunday, December 8 

Founders Day 

11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship. Chapel. Preacher: 

The Reverend Professor James T. Cleland. 

4:00 p.m. Duke University Chapel Choir presents "The 

Messiah." University Chapel. (See special notice for ticket 

information). 

7:00 and 9:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page Auditorium. 

"The Umbrellas of Cherbourg." $.75-adult; $.10-child. 

Monday, December 9 

3:00—6:00 p.m. Graduation for Physical Therapy Students. 

Blair House. 

6:00 p.m. Freshman basketball. Duke vs. North Carolina 

State. Indoor Stadium. 

8:00 p.m. Basketball: Duke vs. University of Michigan. 

Indoor Stadium. 

Tuesday, December 10 

8:00 p.m. Duke University Chapel Choir presents "The 
Messiah." University Chapel. (See special notice for ticket 
information). 

Wednesday, December 11 

7:00 p.m. Delta Mu Tau Christmas Banquet. Ranch House, 

Chapel Hill. 

8:00 p.m. School of Nursing Choral Communion. Hospital 

Amphitheater. 

Thursday, December 12 

9:30—11:30 a.m. Newcomer's Club: Service Project. 

Visiting Salvation Army Home, Tour and Service, 

Needlework Guild. 

8:15 p.m. Duke Players Performance: "Arms and the Man" 

by George Bernard Shaw. Branson Hall. Charge: 

$2.00-general admission; $1.50-students; $1.75-faculty and 

staff. 

Friday, December 13 

8:00 p.m. S.U. Cinematic Arts Committee Film Series: 
"Diary of a Country Priest" and "Mass for Dakota Sioux." 
Auditorium, Biological Sciences Building. Charge: $.75 at 
door. 



8:15 p.m. Duke Players Performance: "Arms and the Man" 
by George Bernard Shaw. Branson Hall. $2.00-general 
admission; $1.75-f acuity and staff; $1.50-students. 
8:15 p.m. Duke Civic Choral Society Concert. Page 
Auditorium. No charge. 

Saturday, December 14 

7:00 and 9:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page Auditorium 

"The Comedians." Charge: $.75-adult; $.10-child. 

6:00 p.m. Freshman basketball: Duke vs. North Greenville 

Junior College. Indoor Stadium. 

8:00 p.m. Basketball: Duke vs. East Tennessee. Indoor 

Stadium. 

8:15 p.m. Duke Players Performance: ' Arms and the Man" 

by George Bernard Shaw. Branson Hall. S2.00-general 

admission; $1.75-faculty and staff; $1.50-students. 

Sunday, December 15 

11:00 am. University Service of Worship. Chapel. Preacher: 

Bishop William R. Cannon. 

7:00 and 9:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page Auditorium. 

"The Comedians." $.75 and .10. 

8:00 p.m. Chancel Singers: 'Christmas in Words and 

Musics." University Chapel. No Charge. 

Monday, December 16 

4:30 p.m. Music Department and Divinity School present 
"Amahl and the Night Visitors." University Chapel. No 
charge. 

Tuesday, December 17 

8:15 p.m. Madrigal Singers Christmas Concert. Music 
Room, East Duke Building. No charge. 

Wednesday, December 18 

3:00 p.m. S.U. Performing Arts: Children's Matinee: 
Performance of "The Nutcracker Ballet" by the Dance 
Department of the North Carolina School of the Arts. Page 
Auditorium. Charge: $1.00 - grades 1-6; $2.00 - adult 
accompanying child. 



November 29, 1968 



5:30 p.m. WSGA Christmas Dinner. Union, East Campus. 
Followed by reading of "The Christmas Carol" by Dr. 
Douglas M. Knight. Music Room. East Duke Building. 
8:15 p.m. S.U. Performing Arts: Performance of "The 
Nutcracker Ballet" by the Dance Department of The North 
Carolina School of the Arts. Page Auditorium. Charge: 
$2.75; $2.25; $1.75. Reserved seating only. 



Thursday, December 19 
Nothing scheduled. 

Friday, December 20 

6:45 p.m. Faculty Club Dinner Party. The Great Hall. 
8:00 p.m. Basketball: Duke vs. Wake Forest. Greensboro. 

Saturday, December 21 

12:30 p.m. Christmas Recess begins. 

Sunday, December 22 

11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship. Chapel. Preacher: 
The Reverend Dr. Creighton Lacy. 

Saturday. December 28 

8:00 p.m. Basketball: Duke vs. Clemson. Indoor Stadium. 

Sunday. December 29 

11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship. Chapel. Preacher: 
The Reverend Dr. Frank Baker. 

Please note corrections in the basketball schedule. 



Number 12 



Published by Duke University Student Activities Department each week when school 
is in session. Subscriptions: $2.50 per year. Address inquiries to Box KM, Duke Station. 
Durham, North Carolina 27706. Application to mail at second class postage rates is 
pending at Durham, North Carolina. 



IMPORTANT— Notices for the Duke University Calendar should be submitted IN 
WRITTEN FORM to Room 207 Flowers Building, West Campus not later than 5:00 p.m., 
Tuesday. Extension 2911. 



Duke University 





Dec. 815, 1968 



Sunday December 8, 

Founders' Day 

10:30-10:45 a.m. Carillon Recital. Mr. J. Samuel 
Hammond, University Carillonneur 

10:45 a.m. Founders' Day: Wreath Laying Ceremony in 
the Memorial Chapel. 

11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship. University 
Chapel. Preacher: The Reverend Professor James T. 
Cleland, Dean of the Chapel. Sermon: "Sacramental 
View of Money." Broadcast over Radio Station WDNC 
and WDNC-FM. 

11:25 a.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Challenges in 
Education." WCHL Chapel Hill. Miss Nina Kamlukin 
will discuss "An International Exchange Program." 

4:00 p.m. Duke Chapel Choir presents "The Messiah." 
University Chapel. 

4:00— 6:00 p.m. International Open House. 2022 Campus 
Drive. 

7:10 and 9:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page Auditorium. 
"THE UMBRELLAS OF CHERBOURG" (French). 
Grand Prize Winner at Cannes. "I've been trying in vain 
to think of someone flinty enough to resist the 
manifold seductions of "The Umbrellas of Cherbourg," 
a tale of young love told entirely in song against a 
background of colors that might have been plundered 
from the palette of some gifted child!" — New Yorker. 
"A triumph of taste, spirit and style.. .Splashy, 
sparkling French musical delights the eye.. .A film of 
unique and haunting beauty!" — Time Magazine. 

7:30 p.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Challenges in 
Education." WPTF Raleigh. Mr. Ashbel Brice will 
discuss "About a University Press." 

Monday, December 9 

9:30— 11:00 a.m. WSGA Lounge Open. Lobby, East 

Campus Union. 
2:00 p.m. Dedication: Nanaline H. Duke Medical Sciences 

Building. First Floor Lecture Room. Speakers: 

President Douglas M. Knight, Dr. Barnes Woodhall, and 

Dr. James T. Cleland. 
3:00— 6:00 p.m. Graduation Ceremony: Physical Therapy 

Students. Blair House. 
3:30 p.m. Chemistry Staff Seminar. Room 01 Chemistry 

Building. Speaker: Professor Walter J. Moore. 
4:15— 5:30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women. 

faculty, staff members, and students. 
5:15 p.m. Faculty Volleyball. Card Gymnasium 
6:00 p.m. Freshman Basketball: Duke vs. North Carolina 

State. Indoor Stadium. 
6:15 p.m. AAUW Meeting. YWCA, Chapel Hill Street. 



Speaker: Mr. Pearson Stewart. 
6:30— 10:30 p.m. Gothic Bookshop: 12th Annual Auction. 

Room 208 Flowers Building. 
7:00 p.m. International Folk Dancing. The Ark, East 

Campus. 
8:00 p.m. Basketball: Duke vs. University of Michigan. 

Indoor Stadium. 



Tuesday, December 10 



9:30-11:00 a.m. WSGA Lounge Open. Lobby, East 

Campus Union. 
10:00 a.m. Divinity School Chapel Service. University 

Chapel. Speaker: Mr. Russ Martin. 
2:00 p.m. The final examination of Mr. Alvin Grant 

Myrick for the Ph.D. degree in Education. Room 119 

Allen Building. 
4:00 p.m. Forest Ecology Seminar. Room 130 Biological 

Sciences Building. Speaker: Mr. Carl M. Gallegos. 
4:15— 5:30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 

faculty, staff members, and students. 
7:30— 10:00 p.m. Scottish Country Dancing. Presbyterian 

Student Center. 
8:00 p.m. Classical Studies Lecture. Karl Zener 

Auditorium, Psychology— Sociology Building. 

Speaker: Professor Kenneth J. Reckford. 
8:00 p.m. Duke Chapel Choir presents "The Messiah." 

University Chapel. 

Wednesday, December 11 

9:30-11:00 a.m. WSGA Lounge Open. Lobby, East 

Campus Union. 
10:00 a.m. Divinity School Chapel. University Chapel. 

Speaker: Mr. Barry Herndon. 
4:00 p.m. Psychology Colloquium. Karl Zener Auditorium. 

Psychology— Sociology Building. Speaker: Dr. Charles 

Butter. 
4:15 p.m. Zoology Seminar. Room 111 Biological Sciences 

Building. Speaker: Professor Hans Bauer. 
4:15— 5:30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 

faculty, staff members, and students. 
7:00 p.m. Delta Mu Tau Christmas Banquet. Ranch House, 

Chapel Hill. 
7:00—8:30 p.m. Chapel Choir Rehearsal. University 

Chapel. 
7:00— 9:00 p.m. Open House Badminton for all men and 

women: faculty and students. East Campus 

Gymnasium. 



7:30 p.m. Duke— UNC Seminar on National Security 

Policy. Room 105 Carr Building. Speaker: Dr. James 

R. Leutze. 
8:00 p.m. YWCA Panel Discussion: Sorority— Independent 

Student Life. Music Room, East Duke Building. 
8:00 p.m. School of Nursing Choral Communion. Hospital 

Amphitheater. 
8:00 p.m. Basketball: Duke vs. Virginia. Charlottesville. 

Thursday, December 12 



9:30-11:00 a.m. WSGA Lounge Open. Lobby, East 

Campus Union. 
9:30 a.m. Newcomers Club Meeting. Salvation Army Home 

and Hospital, 2312 South Alston Avenue. 
10:00 a.m. Divinity School Chapel. Coffee House. Coffee 

House Worship with the Divinity School Choir. 
12:30 p.m. Kappa Delta Pi Luncheon Meeting. East 

Campus Union. Speaker: Dr. Richard Leach. 
2:00 p.m. The final examination of Mr. William Warren 

Reinhardt for the Ph.D. degree in History. Room 117 

Allen Building. 
4:15— 5:30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 

faculty, staff members, and students. 
5:00 p.m. Dean's Hour. Hospital Amphitheater. Speaker: 

Dr. Henry N. Wagner, Jr. 
5:15 p.m. Faculty Volleyball. Card Gymnasium. 
8:15— 9:30 p.m. West Campus Swimming Pool open to 

faculty members and their families. Faculty children 

will be admitted only when accompanied by their 

parents. 
8: 15 p.m. Duke Players Performance: "Arms and the Man" 

by George Bernard Shaw. Branson Auditorium. 

Friday, December 13 

9:30-11:00 a.m. WSGA Lounge Open. Lobby, East 
Campus Union. 

10:00 a.m. Divinity School Chapel Service. University 
Chapel. 

12:30 p.m. Plant Ecology Seminar. Room 144 Biological 
Sciences Building. Speaker: Mr. Alan Smith. 

3:30 p.m. Chemistry Staff Seminar. Room 130 
Psychology— Sociology Building. Speaker: Dr. Eugene 
C. Ashby. 

4:15— 5:30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. Faculty 
daughters, ages 6 to 16, may also swim; those 10 and 
under must be accompanied by their mothers. 

5:30 p.m. UCM Christmas Celebration and Supper. 
Methodist Center. 

7:00— 9:00 p.m. Open House Badminton for all men and 
women: faculty and students. East Campus 
Gymnasium. 

8:00 p.m. S.U. Cinematic Arts Film Series: "DIARY OF A 
COUNTRY PRIEST" directed by Robert Bresson. An 
exceptional film— profound subject, artistic direction, 
beautiful cinematography. A film exploring faith not 
religion through the unfolding of a young priest's 
conflicts and anguish. "MASS FOR A DAKOTA 
SIOUX" directed by Bruce Baillie. Juxtaposition of the 



traditional Introit, Kyrie, Epistle, Gloria, offertory 
with the theme of Death. An experimental film dealing 
with the destruction of a civilization. Baillie is an 
exciting young filmmaker who uses the film as his 
medium for attacking "society." 

8: 15 p.m. Durham Civic Choral Society Christmas Concert. 
Page Auditorium. 

8: 15 p.m. Duke Players Performance: "Arms and the Man" 
by George Bernard Shaw. Branson Auditorium. 



Saturday, December 14 



9:55 a.m. Duke University Radio Program "Challenges in 
Education." WDNC Durham. Miss Nina Kamlukin will 
discuss "An International Exchange Program." 

3:00 p.m. East Campus Gymnasium: Open to students, 
faculty, and staff for recreation (swimming, 
badminton, volleyball, basketball, table tennis). 

6:00 p.m. Freshman Basketball: Duke vs. North Greenville 
Junior College. Indoor Stadium. 

7:00 p.m. Indian Film Showing: "Bandini." Auditorium, 
Biological Sciences Building. 

7:00 and 9:30 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page Auditorium. 
"THE COMEDIANS" with Elizabeth Taylor, Richard 
Burton, AlexGuinness, Peter Ustinov. "Politics and 
passion in Haiti from Graham Greene's novel. 
Depiction of terror under dictator Duvalier packs 
power... — Cue. In color. 

8:00 p.m. Basketball: Duke vs. East Tennessee. Indoor 
Stadium. 

8: 15 p.m. Duke Players Performance: "Arms and the Man" 
by George Bernard Shaw. Branson Auditorium. 



Sunday, December 15 



10:30— 10:4 5 a.m. Carillon Recital. Mr. J. Samuel 

Hammond, University Carillonneur. 
11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship. University 

Chapel. Preacher: Bishop William R. Cannon, Presiding 

Bishop, Raleigh Area, United Methodist Church. 

Broadcast over Radio Station WDNC and WDNC-FM. 
11:25 a.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Challenges in 

Education." WCHL Chapel Hill. Dr. George Pearsall 

will discuss: "New Dimensions in Materials Research." 
4:00-6:00 p.m. International Open House. 2022 Campus 

Drive. 
7:00 and 9:30 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page Auditorium. 

"THE COMEDIANS." 
7:30 p.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Challenges in 

Education." WPTF Raleigh. Dr. Rebecca Buckley will 

discuss "Defects in Immunity." 
8:00 p.m. Chancel Singers present "Christmas in Words 

and Music." University Chapel. 






FOUNDERS' DAY CELEBRATION 

The celebration of Founders' Day this year will be 
observed on Saturday, Sunday, and Monday, December 
7th, 8th, and 9th. The following events have been planned: 
SATURDAY 

12: 30 p.m. The Founders' Day luncheon meeting of the 
Duke University National Council, in the 
Ball Room of the Union. Presiding will be 
Mr. P.J. Baugh, Chairman. The speaker will 
be President Douglas M. Knight. 
SUNDAY 

10:45 a.m. Wreath Laying Ceremony in the Memorial 
Chapel 

11:00 a.m. Service of Worship and Commemoration in 
the University Chapel. 

This Service will begin with a Procession 
involving the Chapel Choir, student 
representatives, officers of the University, 
deans of the colleges and schools, a 
representative of the Alumni Associations, 
and the Chairman of the Board of Trustees. 
Principals in the Service are: Dr. Howard C. 
Wilkinson, Chaplain to the University, who 
will be the presiding minister; Dr. Douglas 
M. Knight, President, who will serve as 
lector; and Dr. James T. Cleland, Dean of 
the Chapel, who will deliver the sermon. 

4:00 p.m.In the University Chapel, the 36th annual 

presentation of Handel's "Messiah" by the 

Chapel Choir, special soloists, and orchestra, 

under the direction of Professor Paul Young. 

MONDAY 

2:00 p.m.Dedication of the new Nanaline H. Duke 
Medical Sciences Building. The program will 
be held in the first-floor lecture room. 
President Douglas M. Knight will speak. Also 
participating will Dr. Barnes Woodhall, 
Associate Provost of the University, and Dr. 
James T. Cleland, Dean of the Chapel. After 
the ceremony, tours will be conducted 
through the building. 

RELIGIOUS ORGANIZATIONS 

ANNOUNCEMENTS 

UNITED CAMPUS CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP and 
WESTMINSTER FELLOWSHIP (UCM). 5:30 p.m. Sunday, 
December 8th. Rides will leave from East Campus Circle for 
the Fred Herzog residence for a snack supper and discussion 
of "Political Theology: Thoughts on a New Movement" 
with Dr. Herzog, Professor of Theology at the Divinity 
School. 

EPISCOPAL (UCM). 8:00 a.m. Sunday, December 8th 
and 15th. Holy Communion. 

9:15 a.m. Sunday, December 8th and 15th. Choral 
Eucharist and sermon. 

5:15 p.m. Thursday, December 12th. Holy Communion. 
Episcopal Center. 

UCM GATHERED COMMUNITIES. 9:00 p.m. Sunday, 
December 8th. Worship. Methodist Center. 

UNITARIAN-UNIVERSALIST FELLOWSHIP. 10:30 
a.m. Sunday, December 8th. Meeting: Professor James 
Hunt of Shaw University will speak on "What Black Power 
Means in Terms of Black and White Cooperation." Carolina 
Friends School (which can be reached by following signs on 



Erwin Road and Mt. Sinai Road. For transportation or 
further information call one of the following numbers 
between 9:30 and 10:00 a.m.: 286-9702, 489-3992, 
489-4600.) 

CATHOLIC. 9:30 a.m. Sunday, December 8th and 15th. 
Mass, Room 130 Psychology— Sociology Building. 
Confession before Mass from 9:00—9:25 a.m. Room 144 
Psychology— Sociology Building. 

12:40 p.m. Daily Mass. Monday, Wednesday, and Friday. 
Room 208 Flowers Building. Tuesday and Thursday. New 
Hospital Chapel. 

SOCIETY OF FRIENDS (QUAKERS). 10:30 a.m. 
Sunday, December 8th and 15th. Worship. 
11:30 a.m. Sunday, December 8th and 15th. Meeting. 404 
Alexander Avenue. 

HILLEL. 5:00 p.m. Sunday, December 8th and 15th. 
Weekly supper. Oak Room. 
7:00 p.m. Every Monday. Folk Dancing. The Ark. 



DUKE CHAPEL CHOIR 

PRESENTS 

"THE MESSIAH" 

The presentation of the "Messiah" by the Duke Chapel 
Choir has been a tradition in this area for thirty-six years. 
First started in 1932 by J. Foster Barnes, until the present 
time, this rendition of Handel's celebrated oratorio has 
continued to attract thousands of people from this state 
and surrounding areas. After cancellation last year of the 
"Messiah," Professor Paul Young will again this year lead 
the 150 voice choir in the singing of this great work. 

Under the adept direction of Professor Young, who has 
directed the choir for the past twelve years, professional 
soloists and orchestra have given this performance new 
heights of excellence for both singers and audiences. 

The dates for the "Messiah" this year are Sunday, 
December 8th, at 4:00 p.m. and Tuesday, December 10th, 
at 8:00 p.m., in the Duke University Chapel. Soloists will 
be Alice Riley, Soprano, from Chicago; Doris Mayes, Mezzo 
Soprano, from Oberlin College, Oberlin, Ohio; Stanley 
Kolk, Tenor, from New York; and Adib Fazah, Bass, from 
New York. With the exception of Adib Fazah, all these 
soloists have sung with the Duke Chapel Choir. Mr. Fazah is 
a newcomer to this area and is an outstanding, established 
artist. Professor Young will conduct the orchestra and 
Giorgio Ciompi will be concertmaster. Benjamin Smith is 
visiting Choral Conductor. Organist will be Dr. Rudolph 
Kremer and James Young, Harpsichordist. 

For the convenience of those attending, free admission 
to the Chapel will be by ticket only until 15 minutes prior 
to each performance. These cards of admission may be 
secured at the Page Box Office or by sending a 
self-addressed.stamped envelope to P.O. Box KM, Duke 
Station, Durham, N.C., stating the number of tickets and 
the performance desired. An offering will be received. 



PANEL DISCUSSION 
ARAB ISRAELI CONFLICT 

A panel discussion on the Arab-Israeli conflict will be 
held at the International House on Sunday, December 8th, 
at 4:00 p.m. Two Duke students from Arab countries and 
two students from Israel will present their respective 



viewpoints of the subject. A general discussion will follow. 



GRADUATION CEREMONY 
PHYSICAL THERAPY STUDENTS 

A graduation ceremony from 3:00—6:00 p.m. on 
Monday, December 9th at Blair House will mark the 
completion by ten students of the fifteen month certificate 
program in physical therapy. Miss Helen Kaiser, Director, 
Department of Physical Therapy, will present the 
certificates. Dr. Stewart Sessoms, Duke Hospital Director, 
will address the group on "Trends in Health Care." 



CHEMISTRY STAFF SEMINAR 

Professor Walter J. Moore, Research Professor, 
Department of Chemistry, Indiana University, will speak at 
the Chemistry Staff Seminar on Monday, December 9th, at 
3:30 p.m. in Room 01 Chemistry Building. The subject of 
Professor Moore's address will be "Chemical Aspects of 
Memory and Learning." All interested persons are cordially 
invited to attend. 



AAUW MEETING 

The American Association of University Women, 
Durham Branch, will meet on Monday, December 9th, at 
the YWCA on Chapel Hill Street. Dinner at 6:15 p.m. is by 
reservation only. The program begins at 7:00 p.m. and is 
open to all. Mr. Pearson Stewart, Director of the Regional 
Planning Commission of the Research Triangle Institute, 
will speak on the topic "An Overview: Long Range 
Planning for the Research Triangle." All women college 
graduates are cordially invited to join. 



GOTHIC BOOKSHOP 
12th ANNUAL AUCTION 

The Gothic Bookshop will hold its 12th Annual Auction 
of rare and scarce books, old documents, maps, prints, and 
paintings on Monday, December 9th, from 6:30—10:30 
p.m. in Room 208 Flowers Building 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. Alvin Grant Myrick for the 
Ph.D. degree in Education will be held on Tuesday, 
December 10th, at 2:00 p.m. in Room 119 Allen Building. 
The subject of Mr. Myrick's dissertation is "Some Effects of 
Space Science Materials Upon Student Achievement in 
Mathematics." The committee to conduct the examination 
consists of Professors Sherwood Githens, Jr., Joseph 
Kitchen, Jr., Thomas D. Reynolds, Olan Petty, and William 
Katzenmeyer. Professor Githens will preside. 

FOREST ECOLOGY SEMINAR 

On Tuesday, December lOili, I,!.. Carl M. Gallegos, 
graduate student i.i the School of Forestry, will present a 
talk on "The Role of Litter in Nature: A Study of Forests 
in the Republic of Panama." The seminar will be held at 
4:00 p.m. in Room 130 Biological Sciences Building. 



CLASSICAL STUDIES LECTURE 

The Department of Classical Studies invites members of 
the University Community to a lecture by Kenneth J. 
Reckford, Associate Professor of Classics, University of 
North Carolina, on Tuesday, December 10th at 8:00 p.m. 
in the Karl Zener Auditorium, Room 130 
Psychology— Sociology Building. Professor Reckford will 
speak on "The Phrontisterion in Aristophanes' 'Clouds'." 



PSYCHOLOGY COLLOQUIUM 

The Department of Psychology will sponsor a 
colloquium on Wednesday, December 11th, at 4:00 p.m. in 
the Karl Zener Memorial Auditorium, Psychology- 
Sociology Building. Dr. Charles Butter of the University of 
Michigan will speak on "Neural Mechanisms of Visual 
Perception in Primates." 

ZOOLOGY SEMINAR 

The Department of Zoology will hold a special seminar 
on Wednesday, December 11th, in Room 111 Biological 
Sciences Building at 4:15 p.m. Professor Hans Bauer, 
Section Head, Max-Planck-Institute fur Meeresbiologie at 
Tubingen, will speak on "X-Ray Induced Chromosomal 
Aberrations in a Parthenogenetic Midge." Professor Bauer 
has made decisive contributions to virtually every area of 
chromosome cytology. He is currently at Duke as Visiting 
Professor and Hargitt Research Fellow in Zoology. Coffee 
and tea will be served at 4:00 p.m. 

DELTA MU TAU 
CHRISTMAS BANQUET 

Delta Mu Tau, student honorary music fraternity, will 
hold its annual Christmas Banquet for members of the 
fraternity and the Music Department Faculty on 
Wednesday, December 11th, at 7:00 p.m. at the Ranch 
House in Chapel Hill. 

DUKE-UNC SEMINAR 
NATIONAL SECURITY POLICY 

Dr. James R. Leutze, Assistant Professor of History at 
the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, will discuss 
British— American strategy in the first phases of World War 
II at 7:30 p.m. on Wednesday, December 11th, in Room 
105 Carr Building. 

NEWCOMERS CLUB MEETING 

On Thursday, December 12th, at 9:30 a.m. Duke 
Newcomers Club of Campus Club will meet at the Salvation 
Army Home and Hospital, 2312 South Alston Avenue to 
prepare layettes for the Salvation Army. Mrs. Louis D. 
Volpp is sewing chairman. All members, with or without 
sewing ability, are urged to participate in this annual service 
project. Transportation, if needed, may be arranged by 
calling Mrs. Volpp at 682-0855. 

KAPPA DELTA PI LUNCHEON MEETING 

On Thursday, December 12th, at 12:30 p.m., Kappa 
Delta Pi, Education Honorary, will hold its monthly 
meeting in the East Campus Union. Dr. Richard Leach of 
the Department of Political Science will speak on "Political 
Science and Education." 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. William Warren Reinhardt 
for the Ph.D. degree in History will be held on Thursday, 
December 12th, at 2:00 p.m. in Room 117 Allen Building. 
The subject of Mr. Reinhardt's dissertation is "The 
Legislative Council Of the Punjab 1897-1912." The 
committee to conduct the examination consists of 
Professors Robert Crane, W.B. Hamilton, Harold T. Parker, 
William C. McCormack. Professor Crane will preside. 

DEAN'S HOUR 

The Dean's Hour will be held on Thursday, December 
12th, at 5:00 p.m. in the Hospital Amphitheater. Dr. Henry 
N. Wagner, Jr., Professor of Radiology and Radiological 
Science, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, 
Maryland, will speak on "Studies of the Circulation with 
Radioactive Particles." 

DUKE PLAYERS PERFORMANCE 
"ARMS AND THE MAN" 

The Duke Players will present George Bernard Shaw's 
"Arms and the Man" as their second major production of 
the year. The play will be performed for three nights, 
December 12th, 13th, and 14th, at 8:15 p.m. in Branson 
Auditorium on East Campus. Tickets, priced at $2.00 — 
general admission; $1.75 — faculty and staff; and $1.50 — 
students, will be on sale beginning Monday, December 9th 
at the Page Box Office from 8:30 a.m. - 1:00 p.m. and at 
the Branson Hall Box Office from 2:00 - 5:00 p.m. 

"Arms and the Man" is the always good-humored 
expression of Shaw's credo that achievement and happiness 
can derive only from an honest contending with reality. 
Ever since its first performance in 1894, Shaw's "Arms and 
the Man" has held a prominent place in the repertory of the 
English-speaking stage. The play is a brilliant, double-edged 
satire on the romantic view of life, and on war and the 
professional fighting man. It is set in Bulgaria in 1885. 

In this play, nothing works as the romantics say it 
should. The hero, Captain Bluntschli, a professional soldier 
considerably more interested in saving his skin than in being 
a hero, carries chocolates instead of bullets in his cartridge 
belt. The heroine, Raina Petkoff, has noble bearing and a 
thrilling voice, but is an unconscionable liar. The cliche 
romantic hero, Sergius Saranoff, is a fool in practical 
situations. The charge he has led was successful only 
because the enemy had been given ammunition of the 
wrong caliber. Furthermore, although he pretends the 
loftiest love for Raina, he flirts with the servant girl at the 
first opportunity. Major Petkoff, the commander of the 
Bulgarian army, knows so little of military matters that he 
cannot get his troops home from the war. Bluntschli brings 
order into the chaos of the Petkoff household, gets the 
Bulgarian army home again, and forces Raina to admit both 
that the romantic Sergius bores her and that her nobility is 
a sham. By the final curtain, Sergius and Major Petkoff and 
his wife have managed to rationalize Bluntschli into a 
romantic scheme of things. But Raina has come to grips 
with a more realistic picture of the world and agrees to 
marry a real man, not a figure out of a fancy dress ball. 

This production is directed by Dr. Victor Michalak of 
the English Department. The scenery was designed by Mr. 
Hitoshi Sato, Technical Director of Duke Players. 



PLANT ECOLOGY SEMINAR 

Mr. Alan Smith of the Department of Botany will speak 
on "Buttressing of Tropical Trees: A Review, With 
Examples from Costa Rica" at the Plant Ecology Seminar 
on Friday, December 13th, at 12:30 p.m. in Room 144 
Biological Sciences Building. 



CHEMISTRY STAFF SEMINAR 

Dr. Eugene C. Ashby, Associate Professor of Chemistry 
at the Georgia Institute of Technology, will speak at the 
Chemistry Staff Seminar on Friday, December 13th, at 
3:30 p.m. in Room 130 Psychology— Sociology Building. 
The subject of Dr. Ashby's address will be "Grignard 
Reagents. Compositions and Reaction Mechanisms." All 
interested persons are cordially invited to attend. 



UCM CHRISTMAS CELEBRATION 

The University Christian Movement will have its 
monthly gathering, in the form of a Christmas Festival and 
celebration, on Friday, December 13th, at the Methodist 
Center. Supper, for $.50, will begin at 5:30 p.m. and will be 
followed by a program using several art forms — peotry, 
dance, drama, and music — to express and lift up the joyous 
meanings of the season. The whole University Community 
is cordially invited to this evening of festivities. Supper 
reservations must be made by calling 684-2921 any time 
prior to Wednesday, December 11th, at 5:00 p.m. 



CHRISTMAS CONCERT 
DURHAM CIVIC CHORAL SOCIETY 

The Durham Civic Choral Society will present its 19th 
annual Christmas Concert on Friday, December 13th, in 
Page Auditorium at 8:15 p.m. There is no charge for 
admission and the public is cordially invited with a special 
invitation extended to children. A reception will follow the 
performance. 

This years' group of 100 voices is the largest to appear in 
the history of the Society. Allan Bone, the 
founder— conductor of the Society in 1949, returns to lead 
the group in: 

Contata No. 140 (Wachet Auf) J. S. Bach 

A Ceremony of Carols B. Britten 

The Christmas Story R. Nelson 

The Choral Society this season is fortunate in being able 
to draw from its own ranks the quality of professionalism it 
has enjoyed in the past by inviting nationally known guest 
artists. The soloists for this Christmas Concert will be Susan 
Long, soprano; Wayne Turnage, bass; Roderick Ironsides, 
tenor; Shelia Berninger, soprano; and Ann Headless, 
soprano. Also performing in featured roles will be Giorgio 
Ciompi, violin; Jean Russ, oboe; and Jeanne Chalifoux, 
harp. The orchestra will again be made up of 45 members 
of the Duke Symphony. In preparing for the December 
13th concert, the group has rehearsed each Monday evening 
since September, accompanied by Mrs. Kay Heustis. 

Membership will reopen again in January, 1969, in 
preparation for the Spring Concert. All who are interested 
are invited to join. There are no auditions. 



INDIAN FILM SHOWING 

The Duke Indian students will present an Indian film, 
"Bandini" (Prisoner), on Saturday, December 14th at 7:00 
p.m. in the Biological Sciences Auditorium. Admission of 
$1.00 may be paid at the door. Featuring India's greatest 
screen personalities, Ashok Kumar, Nutan, Dharminder, 
Raja Pranjpe, and directed by Bimal Roy, the film will 
carry English sub-titles. 

"Bandini" is a story of an unusual prisoner, Kalyani, a 
young, innocent- looking, well-behaved and helpful girl. No 
one knew the past of this young criminal, not even the 
handsome jail-doctor Devendra who had fallen in love with 
her. Disregarding the social stigma attached to Kalyani, as 
she was a prisoner, Devendra confessed his love for her and 
proposed marriage. But she would not respond.. .Kalyani 
kept waiting for Bikash Ghosh, a terrorist leader who had 
declared her to be his wife under dramatic circumstances, 
and had promised to marry her on his release from the jail. 
But there was no news from Bikash... The most agonising 
moment for her came when both Devendra and Bikash 
crossed her path once again, and she stood at the 
cross-roads of her life. 



CHRISTMAS IN WORDS AND MUSIC 

The annual service, "Christmas in Words and Music," 
will be presented by the Chancel Singers on Sunday, 
December 15th at 8:00 p.m. in the University Chapel. Mr. 
Benjamin Smith, visiting Choral Conductor will direct the 
program assisted by Mr. James Young, harpsichordist, and 
Miss Marion Ryan, harpist. The program will include 
traditional Christmas music with scripture readings and 
audience participation in the singing of Christmas carols. 
The public is cordially invited to attend without charge. 



UNICEF CARDS 

The YWCA is selling UNICEF cards and calendars from 
now until Christmas. They are available in a limited supply 
from East Campus dormitory representatives and will be 
sold on the West Main Quad starting next week. The cards 
are $1.50 for a box of ten cards (different designs 
available). Calendars, in a combination French— English 
text, are $2.50. Only a limited supply of cards is available. 
Checks should be made payable to the Duke YWCA. For 
further information call the YWCA office at extension 
2909. 



UNDERGRADUATE FACULTY COUNCIL 
MEETING CALLED 

The meeting of the Undergraduate Faculty Council is 
scheduled for Thursday, December 12th has been cancelled. 



ADVANCE NOTICE 

S.U. PERFORMING ARTS COMMITTEE 

"NUTCRACKER BALLET" TICKETS 

Tickets are now available in Page Box Office for the two 
performances of "The Nutcracker" to be presented by the 
Dance Department of the N. C. School of the Arts in 
Winston-Salem on Wednesday, December 18th, in Page 
Auditorium. A children' matinee will be presented by 3:00 
p.m. with a special general admission charge of $1.00 for 
children in grades 1—6 and $2.00 for adults (only admitted 
when accompanying a child). 

Admission for the evening performance at 8:15 p.m. will 
provide reserved seating with tickets priced at $2.75, $2.25, 
and $1.75. 

Checks should be made payable to Duke University 
Student Union, Box KM, Duke Station, Durham, N. C. and 
sent with stamped, self-addressed envelope for ticket 
return. The Box Office is open Monday— Friday from 9:00 
a.m. — 4:30 p.m. and the phone is 684-4059. 

The music for the matinee will be by tape (used in all 
usual performances). For the evening performance the 
music will be provided by the N. C. Symphony Orchestra 
under the direction of Dr. Benjamin Swalin. The Ballet is 
directed by Robert Lindgren, Dean of the Department of 
Dance, N. C. School of the Arts. 



MEDICAL CENTER LIBRARY 

HOLIDAY SCHEDULE 

1968-1969 



Saturday, December 21 
Sunday, December 22 

Monday, December 23 
Tuesday, December 24 

WEDNESDAY. DECEMBER 25 

Thursday, December 26 
Friday, December 27 

Saturday, December 28 
Sunday, December 29 

Monday, December 30 
Tuesday, December 31 

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 1 

Thursday, January 2 
Friday, January 3 

Saturday, January 4 
Sunday, January 5 

Monday, January 6 



8:30 a.m. 
1:00 p.m. 

8:30 a.m. 
8:30 a.m. 

CLOSED 

8:30 a.m. 
8:30 a.m. ■ 

8:30 a.m. 
1:00 p.m. 

8:30 a.m. ■ 
8: 30 a.m. 

Closed 



5:00 p.m. 
5:00 p.m. 

10:00 p.m. 
1:00 p.m. 



10:00 p.m. 
10:00 p.m. 

5:00 p.m. 
5:00 p.m. 

• 10:00 p.m. 
1:00 p.m. 



8:30 a.m. - 10:00 p.m. 
8:30 a.m. -10:00 p.m. 

8:30 a.m. -5:00 p.m. 
1:00 p.m. -5:00 p.m. 

Resume regular schedule 



DUKE UNIVERSITY LIBRARY SCHEDULE 
Christmas 1968 



rkins Library 






Woman's College Library 






Sat, Dec. 21 




8:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m. 


Sat., Dec. 21 


9:00 a.m. 


- 1:00 p.m. 


Sun., Dec. 22 




Closed 


Sun., Dec. 22 


Closed 




Mon. - Tues., Dec 


23-24 


8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. 


Mon. - Tues., Dec. 23-24 


9:00 a.m. 


- 5:00 p.m. 


Wed., Dec 25 




Closed 


Wed., Dec. 25 


Closed 




Thurs. - Fri., Dec. 


26-27 


8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. 


Thurs. - Fri., Dec. 26-27 


9:00 a.m. 


- 5:00 p.m. 


Sat., Dec. 28 




8:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m. 


Sat., Dec. 28 


9:00 a.m. 


- 1:00 p.m. 


Sun., Dec. 29 




Closed 


Sun., Dec. 29 


Closed 




Mon. - Tues., Dec. 


30-31 


8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. 


Mon. - Tues., Dec. 30-31 


9:00 a.m. 


- 5:00 p.m. 


Wed., Jan. 1 




Closed 


Wed., Jan. 1 


Closed 




Thurs. - Fri., Jan. 


2-3 


8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. 


Thurs. - Fri., Jan. 2-3 


9:00 a.m. 


- 5:00 p.m. 


Sat., Jan. 4 




8:00 am. - 1:00 p.m. 


Sat., Jan. 4 


9:00 a.m. 


- 1:00 p.m. 


Sun., Jan. 5 




Closed 


Sun., Jan. 5 


Closed 




Mon., Jan. 6 




Resume regular schedule 


Mon., Jan. 6 


Resume regular schedule 



DUKE UNIVERSITY 

OFFICIAL EXAMINATION SCHEDULE 

FALL SEMESTER, 1968 

ANY STUDENT WISHING TO PETITION FOR RELIEF FROM THREE EXAMINATIONS WITHIN TWENTY-FOUR 
HOURS OR TWO EXAMINATIONS AT THE SAME TIME' MUST REPORT TO HIS DEAN'S OFFICE NOT LATER THAN 
DECEMBER 20, 1968, TO REQUEST A CHANGE IN SCHEDULE. 



Monday and Tuesday, January 13, and 14, 


1969-Readi 


Wednesday 


9:00-12 


15th 


2:00- 5 




7:00-10 


Thursday 


9:00-12 


16th 


2:00- 5 




7:00-10 


Friday 


9:00-12 


17th 


2:00- 5 




7:00-10 


Saturday 


9:00-12 


18th 


2:00- 5 


Monday 


9:00-12 


20th 


2:00- 5 




7:00-10 


Tuesday 


9:00-12 


21st 


2:00- 5 




7:00-10 


Wednesday 


9:00-12 


22nd 


2:00- 5 




7:00-10 


Thursday 


9:00-12 


23rd 


2:00- 5 




7:00-10 


Friday 


9:00-12 


24th 


2:00- 5 



ing Period 
':00N 
:00 pm 
:00 pm 
:00N 
:00 pm 
:00 pm 
:00N 
:00 pm 
00 pm 
:00N 
:00 pm 
;:00N 
:00 pm 
i:00 
:00N 
:00 pm 
:00 pm 
:00N 
:00 pm 
i:00 pm 
:00N 
:00 pm 
:00 pm 
::00N 
:00 pm 



French, Spanish, German 63 

MWF-4 

Religion 1, IX 

TTS-4, Engineering 1.4-1.6 

History 1, IX 

MWF-3 

English 1 

TTS-6 

Physics 1, 41, 51 

Biology 1 

TTS-2 

MWF-2, Engineering 1.1-1.3 

Math 21, 21A 

TT-7 

MWF-5 

TTS-1 

Economics 1, 51 

MWF-7 

Air & Naval Science 

Chemistry 1, 41 

Language 1 

TTS-3 

P.S. 11 

MWF-6 

MWF-1 



Chemistry and Biology (except Chemistry 1 and Biology 1) classes meet for examination at the time scheduled for their 
general lecture period. 

ANY EXAMINATION NOT COVERED IN THE FOREGOING SCHEDULE IS TO BE ARRANGED BY THE 
INSTRUCTOR IN CHARGE OF THE COURSE IN THE PERIOD BEGINNING JANUARY 15, 9:00 a.m. AND ENDING 
JANUARY 24, 5:00 p.m. NO EXAMINATION IS TO BE GIVEN BEFORE 9:00 a.m. JANUARY 15, WITH THE 
EXCEPTION OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION. NO CHANGE IS TO BE MADE IN ANY SCHEDULED EXAMINATION 
WITHOUT THE APPROVAL OF THE COMMITTEE. 

University schedule Committee 

7 



December 6, 1968 Number 13 



Published by Duke University Student Activities Department each week when school 
is in session. Subscriptions: $2.50 per year. Address inquiries to Box KM, Duke Station, 
Durham, North Carolina 27706. Application to mail at second class postage rates is 
pending at Durham. North Carolina. 

IMPORTANT-Notices for the Duke University Calendar should be submitted IN 
WRITTEN FORM to Room 207 Flowers Building, West Campus not later than 5:00 p.m., 
Tuesday. Extension 2911. 



15-22, 



Sunday, December 15 



Mr. 



Samuel 



10:30-10:45a.m. Carillon Recital. 

Hammond, University Carillonneur. 
11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship. University 

Chapel. Preacher: Bishop William R. Cannon, Presiding 

Bishop, Raleigh Area, United Methodist Church. 

Sermon: Broadcast over Radio Station WDNC and 

WDNC-FM. 
11:25 a.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Challenges in 

Education." WCHL Chapel Hill. Dr. George Pearsall 

will discuss "New Dimensions in Materials Research." 
4:00— 6:00 p.m. International Open House. 2022 Campus 

Drive. 
7:00 and 9:30 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page Auditorium. 

"THE COMEDIANS" with Elizabeth Taylor, Richard 

Burton, Alex Guinness, Peter Ustinov. "Politics and 

passion in Haiti from Graham Greene's novel. 

Depiction of terror under dictator Duvalier packs 

power..."— Cue. In color. 
7:30 p.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Challenges in 

Education." WPTF Raleigh. Dr. Rebecca Buckley will 

discuss "Defects in Immunity." 
8:00 p.m. Chancel Singers present "Christmas in Word and 

Music." University Chapel. 



Monday, December 16 

Campus Union. 
4:15 p.m. Zoology Seminar. Room 111 Biological Sciences 

Building. Speaker: Dr. Peter Weigl. 
4:15— 5:30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 

faculty, staff members, and students. 
4:30 p.m. Chapel Performance: "Amahl and the Night 

Visitors." University Chapel. 
5:15 p.m. Faculty Volleyball. Card Gymnasium. 
7:00 p.m. Internationa] Folk Dancing. The Ark, East 

Campus. 



Tuesday, December 17 



Lounge Open. Lobby, East 



9:30-11:00 a.m. WSGA 

Campus Union. 
10:00 a.m. Divinity School Chapel Service. University 

Chapel. Speaker: Dr. Stuart Henry. Reader: Mr. San 

McMillan. 



10:00 a.m. The final examination of Mr. A. T. R. Rahman 

for the Ph.D. degree in Political Science. Room 302 

Perkins Library. 
4:00 p.m. Forest Ecology Seminar. Room 130 Biological 

Sciences Building. Speaker: Mr. Ralph C. Winkworth. 
4:15— 5:30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 

faculty, staff members, and students. 
7:30—10:00 p.m. Scottish Country Dancing. Presbyterian 

Student Center. 
7:30 p.m. Trinity College Historical Society. Karl Zener 

Auditorium, Psychology— Sociology Building. Speaker: 

Mr. John W. Blassingame. 
8:15 p.m. Christmas Concert: Duke Madrigal Singers. 

Music Room, East Duke Buildinng. 



Wednesday, December 18 



9:30-11:00 a.m. WSGA Lounge Open. Lobby, East 

Campus Union. 
10:00 a.m. Divinity School Chapel. University Chapel. 

Speaker: Dr. Stuart Henry. Reader: Mr. John Wallace. 
10:00 a.m. The final examination of Mr. Marshall Robert 

Crosby for the Ph.D. degree in Botany. Room 140 

Biological Sciences Building. 
2:30 p.m. The final examination of Mr. David Owen Lucas 

for the Ph.D. degree in Microbiology. Room 113 Old 

Laundry Building. 
3:00 p.m. S.U. Performing Arts Committee presents "The 

Nutcracker." Page Auditorium. 
4:15— 5:30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 

faculty, staff members, and students. 
5:30 p.m. WSGA Christmas Dinner. Union, East Campus. 

Followed by reading of "The Christmas Carol" by 

President Douglas M. Knight. Music Room, East Duke 

Building. 
7:00—8:30 p.m. Chapel Choir Rehearsal. University 

Chapel. 
7:00—9:00 p.m. Open House Badminton for all men and 

women: faculty and students. East Campus 

Gymnasium. 
8:15 p.m. S.U. Performing Arts Committee presents "The 

Nutcracker" with The North Carolina Symphony 

Orchestra. 



Thursday, December 19 



9:30-11:00 a.m. WSGA 
Campus Union. 



Lounge Open. Lobby, East 



10:00 a.m. Divinity School Chapel. University Chapel. The 
Divinity School Choir's Annual Christmas Concert. 

4:00 p.m. Academic Council Meeting. Room 208 Flowers 
Building. 

4:15— 5:30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. 

5:15 p.m. Faculty Volleyball. Card Gymnasium. 

8:15— 9:30 p.m. West Campus Swimming Pool open to 
faculty members and their families. Faculty children 
will be admitted only when accompanied by their 
parents. 



Friday, December 20 



Lounge Open. Lobby, East 



School Chapel Service. University 
of Holy Communion. Celebrant: Dr. 



9:30-11:00 a.m. WSGA 

Campus Union. 
10:00 a.m. Divinity 

Chapel. Service 

John J. Rudin. 
4:15—5:30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 

faculty, staff members, and students. Faculty 

daughters, ages 6 to 16, may also swim; those 10 and 

under must be accompanied by their mothers. 
7:00—9:00 p.m. Open House Badminton for all men and 

women: faculty and students. East Campus 

Gymnasium. 
8:00 p.m. Basketball: Duke vs. Wake Forest. Greensboro. 



Saturday, December 21 



9:55 a.m. Duke University Radio Program "Challenges in 
Education." WDNC Durham. Dr. George Pearsall will 
discuss "New Dimensions in Materials Research." 

12:30 p.m. Christmas Recess Begins. 

3:00—5:00 p.m. East Campus Gymnasium: Open to 
students, faculty, and staff for recreation (swimming, 
badminton, volleyball, basketball, table tennis). 

N.B. Quadrangle Pictures :Film Showings will resume on 
Saturday and Sunday, January 11th and 12th. 



Sunday, December 22 



10:30— 10:45am. Carillon Recital. Mr. J. Samuel 

Hammond, University Carillonneur. 
11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship. University 

Chapel. Preacher: The Reverend Dr. Creighton Lacy, 

Professor World Christianity. Broadcast over Radio 

Station WDNC and WDNC-FM. 
11:25 a-m. Duke University Radio Program, "Challenges in 

Education." WCHL Chapel Hill. Mr. Larry James will 

discuss "Legal Aid for the Poor." 
4:00—6:00 p.m. International Open House. 2022 Campus 

Drive. 



7:30 p.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Challenges in 
Education." WPTF Raleigh. Dr. Howard Clark will 
discuss "The Engineer's Role in Medicine." 



UNIVERSITY SERVICE OF WORSHIP 

The Reverend William R. Cannon, Presiding Bishop, 
Raleigh Area, United Methodist Church, will deliver the 
sermon at the University Service of Worship at 11:00 a.ra 
Sunday, December 15th, in the University Chapel. 



RELIGIOUS ORGANIZATIONS 
ANNOUNCEMENTS 

Episcopal (UCM). 8:00 a.m. Sunday, December 15th. 
Holy Communion. 

9:15 a.m. Sunday, December 15th. Choral Eucharist and 
sermon. 

5:15 p.m. Thursday, December 19th. Holy Communion. 
Episcopal Center. 

CATHOLIC. 9:30 a.m. Sunday, December 15th. Mass. 
Room 130 Psychology— Sociology Building. Confession 
before Mass from 9:00 — 9:25 a.m. Room 144 
Psychology— Sociology Building. 

12:40 p.m. Daily Mass. Monday, Wednesday, and Friday. 
Room 208 Flowers Building. Tuesday and Thursday. New 
Hospital ChapeL 

SOCIETY OF FRIENDS (QUAKERS). 10:30 a.m. 
Sunday, December 15th. Worship. 

11:30 a.m. Sunday, December 15th. Meeting. 404 
Alexander Avenue. 

HILLEL. 5:00 p.m. Sunday, December 15th. Weekly 
supper. Oak Room. 
7:00 p.m. Every Monday. Folk Dancing. The Ark. 

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZATION. 7:00 p.m. 
Tuesday, December 17th. Weekly testimony meeting. 
Chapel Room, East Duke Building. 

CHANCEL SINGERS PRESENT 
CHRISTMAS IN WORD AND MUSIC 

The annual service, "Christmas in Word and Music," will 
be presented by the Chancel Singers on Sunday, December 
15th, at 8:00 p.m. in the University Chapel. Mr. Benjamin 
Smith, visiting Choral Conductor will direct the program 
assisted by Mr. James Young, harpsichordist, and Miss 
Marion Ryan, harpist. The program will include traditional 
Christmas music with scripture readings and audience 
participation in the singing of Christmas carols. The public 
is cordially invited to attend without charge. 



ZOOLOGY SEMINAR 

The Department of Zoology will hold a special seminar 
on Monday, December 16th, at 4:15 p.m. in Room 111 
Biological Sciences Building. Dr. Peter Weigl, Assistant 
Professor of Biology, Wake Forest University, will speak on 



"The Ecology of Two Flying Squirrels: A Test of 
Competitive Exclusion." Dr. Weigl received his 
undergraduate education at Williams College and recently 
completed his doctoral studies on flying squirrels at Duke. 
Coffee and tea will be served at 4:00 p.m. 



AMAHL AND THE NIGHT VISITORS 
CHAPEL PERFORMANCE 



The Duke Department of Music and the Divinity School 
will co-sponsor a presentation of Menotti's "Amahl and The 
Night Visitors" on Monday, December 16th, at 4:30 p.m. 
in the University Chapel. The Christmas Story from Luke 
will be read prior to the performance which will utilize 
costumes and props against the natural background of the 
Chapel itself. There is no admission charge and the public is 
cordially invited to attend. 

The cast of characters follows: Amahl, Bonnie Harkey; 
His Mother, Susan Long; King Kaspar, William Stevens; 
King Melchior, Phillip Washburn; King Balthazar, Richard 
Martin; The Page, Mark Arnold. 

An instrumental ensemble consisting of Sam Hammond, 
organ; Frances Evans, keyboard; Scott Hill, keyboard; and 
Nancy Washburn, flute; will accompany the group. 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. A. T. R. Rahman for the 
Ph.D. degree in Political Science will be held on Tuesday, 
December 17th, at 10:00 a.m. in Room 302 Perkins 
Library. The subject of Mr. Rahman's dissertation is "The 
Concept of Political Development Origins And Current 
Manifestations." The committee to conduct the 
examination consists of Professors Ralph Braibanti, John H. 
Hallowed, Hugh M. Hall, and Joseph J. Spengler. Professor 
Braibanti will preside. 



FOREST ECOLOGY SEMINAR 

Mr. Ralph C. Winkworth, State Forester of North 
Carolina, will present a talk on "State Forestry" at the 
Forest Ecology Seminar on Tuesday, December 17th, at 
4:00 p.m. in Room 130 Biological Sciences Building. 



TRINITY COLLEGE HISTORICAL SOCIETY 

Mr. John W. Blassingame will speak to the Trinity 
College Historical Society on Tuesday, December 17th, at 
7:30 p.m. in the Karl Zener Auditorium, 
Psychology— Sociology Building. Mr. Blassingame, Assistant 
Editor of the Booker T. Washington Papers at the 
University of Maryland, will undertake a re-examination of 
the Elkins thesis under the title, "Sambo: Myth or 
Reality?" All interested persons are cordially invited to 
attend. 



CHRISTMAS CONCERT 
DUKE MADRIGAL SINGERS 

The Duke Madrigal Singers, under the direction of Mrs. 
Eugenia Saville, will present a program of Christmas music 
on Tuesday, December 17th, at 8:15 p.m. in the Music 
Room, East Duke Building. The program will be composed 
of motets, anthems, and carols taken from the Renaissance, 
late Middle Ages, and modern periods. Eighteen voices join 
in compositions of late sixteenth-century British liturgical 
polyphony, an old Scottish Medley for Christmas, and 
modern settings of old carol texts. No admission will be 
charged and the public is cordially invited to attend. 

Mr. John Hanks, tenor, Professor of Music and Head of 
Voice Instruction will be featured in a group of 
fourteenth-century Italian "Laudi Spirituali." These works 
are taken from ancient manuscripts, a number of which 
were found in manuscripts in the Rare Book section of 
Perkins Library. He will be accompanied by Mr. Peter 
Standaart, flutist. Mr. William Gudger is accompanist for 
the group which is made up of members of many different 
departments at Duke University. 

The program follows: 

I. Liturgical Polyphony from the late Renaissance 
Alleluia I heard a voice T. Weelkes 
Beata viscera W. Byrd 

O magnum mysterium W. Byrd 

Gloria in excelsis T. Weelkes 

II. Laudi Spirituali from Late Medieval Times 

John Hanks, tenor, assisted by Peter Standaart, 

flute 
O divina virgo 
Dimmi dolce Maria 
Christo e nato 
Sovrana si ne' sembiante 
Gloria in cielo 

III. A Medley, Three Carols, and a Dancing Song 

All Sons of Adam anonymous Scottish 

(The Christmas Medley) 
Three Carols P. Wishart 

There is no rose of such virtue 

Lullay, lay lay 

Alleluya, a New Work is come on hand 
My Dancing Day Trad. English 

FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. Marshall Robert Crosby for 
the Ph.D. degree in Botany will be held on Wednesday, 
December 18th, at 10:00 a.m. in Room 140 Biological 
Sciences Building. The subject of Mr. Crosby's dissertation 
is "A Revision Of The Tropical American Moss Genus 
'Pilotrichum.' " The committee to conduct the examination 
consists of Professors Lewis E. Anderson, Dwight Billings, 
Richard W. White, Robert L. Wilbur, and Dan Livingstone. 
Professor Anderson will preside. 

FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. David Owen Lucas for the 
Ph.D. degree in Microbiology will be held on Wednesday, 
December 18th, at 2:30 in Room 113 Old Laundry 
Building. The subject of Mr. Lucas's dissertation is "An 
Immunological Investigation Of Specific Antigens Of The 
Cornea And Other Ocular Tissues." The committee to 



conduct the examination consists of Professors Richard S. 
Metzgar, D. Bernhard Amos, Chester Zmijewski, Charles 
Tanford, and Kenneth McCarty. Professor Metzgar will 
preside. 

S.U. PERFORMING ARTS COMMITTEE 

PRESENTS 

"NUTCRACKER" PERFORMANCES 

The Performing Arts Committee of the Student Union 
will sponsor two performances of "The Nutcracker" to be 
presented by the School of Dance, N. C. School of the Arts, 
on Wednesday, December 18th in Page Auditorium. The 
special childrens' matinee will begin at 3:00 p.m. with 
tickets priced at $1.00 for children and $2.00 for 
accompanying adults. The evening performance will begin 
at 8:15 p.m. and this performance will be accompanied by 
the North Carolina State Symphony conducted by Dr. 
Benjamin Swalin. All seats are reserved for the evening 
performance, priced at $2.75, $2.25, and $1.75. All tickets 
are available at Page Box Office, extension 4059. 

Robert Lindgren, Dean of the School of Dance, N. C. 
School of the Arts, is the director of the entire production. 
He is assisted by members of the Dance Faculty: Sonja 
Tyven, Duncan Nobel, Peter van Muyden, Joan Sanders, 
Job Saunders, and Gyula Pandi. The production stage 
manager is Michael J. Hotopp. 

"The Nutcracker" is without a doubt one of the most 
beloved of all ballets, appealing to both young and old 
alike. It is pure fantasy— an amazing fairy story of a little 
girl who dreams her toy-soldier nutcracker she received for 
Christmas is a handsome prince. In the dream, the prince 
leads her toys into battle against huge dancing mice and 
then takes the little girl to Snow Country where the 
delicate snowfall is made more realistic by the presence of a 
Snow Queen and King and a whole court of Snowflakes. On 
to the Kingdom of Candy where a celebration is held in the 
Palace of Sweets in honor of the little girl-and sugarplum 
fairies dance, indeed! 

A Winston-Salem reviewer cautions parents that 
"youngsters attending Nutcracker performances should 
leave all preconceptions in the parking lot and abandon 
themselves to the fun and exhilaration of the most opulent 
ballet they may ever experience." 

The performances mark the first time the State 
Symphony and the Ballet have performed together and the 
first presentation of "The Nutcracker" by the Ballet 
outside of Winston-Salem where all performances- have sold 
out for the past two years. The members of the University 
Community are especially invited to see these truly 
remarkable performances by superb young dancers and 
staged in the best traditional and professional manner. 
ACADEMIC COUNCIL MEETING 

The Academic Council will meet at 4:00 p.m. on 
Thursday, December 19th, in Room 208 Flowers Building. 
UNICEF CARDS 

The YWCA is selling UNICEF cards and calendars from 
now until Christmas. They are available in a limited supply 
from East Campus dormitory representatives and will be 
sold on the West Main Quad starting next week. The cards 
are $1.50 for a box of ten cards (different designs 
available). Calendars, in a combination French-English 
text are $2.50. Only a limited supply of cards is available 
Checks should be made payable to the Duke YWCA For 
further information call the YWCA office at extension 



SUMMER 1969 
EUROPEAN GROUP FLIGHTS 

For the eighth consecutive year, the Student Activities 
Office 202-A Flowers Building, is offering Duke European 
Group Fare Flights to members of the Duke University 
Community (faculty, staff, students, and employees). The 
Activities Office will provide tickets only for economy class 
jet air transportation. All other arrangements are the 
responsibility of the individual. 

All faculty, staff, students, and employees of Duke 
University are eligible who have been associated with Duke 
for six months prior to departure times. 
Dates... 

Flight 1 (Wash.,) Pan Am June 9 (Paris) Pan Am Aug. 26 
Flight 2 (NYC) Air India June 9(London) ir India Aug. 28 
Flight 3 (NYC) Air India June 10 (Lon.) Air India July 14 
Flight 4 (NYC) Pan Am July 23 (London) Pan Am Aug. 27 

Fares... 

Minimum of 25 Persons 



NYC to London 

Adult $300.00 

Child (12 & over).... 300.00 

Child (2-11) 150.00 

Child (under 2) 30.00 



Washington to Paris 

Adult $363.80 

Child (12 & over) ...363.80 

Child (2-11) 181.90 

Child (under 2) 36.40 

Minimum of 50 persons 
NYC to London Washington to Paris 

Adult $245.00 Adult $297.80 

Child (12 & over) ...245.00 Child (12 & over) ...297.80 

Child (2-11) 122.50 Child (2-11) 148.90 

Child (under 12) 24.50 Child (under 2) 29.80 

(All fares are effective as of 1 April 1968) 

Child's fare is based on age on date of flight departure. 
No deposit required for children under 12. 

Application forms are available at the Flowers 
Information Desk and Room 207 Flowers Building. For 
further information call the Student Activities Office 
684-2911 or write Box KM, Duke Station, Durham, N. C. 



DUKE UNIVERSITY LIBRARY SCHEDULE 
Christmas 1968 

Perkins and Woman's College Libraries 



Sat., Dec. 21 

Sun., Dec. 22 

Mon., Dec. 23 

Tues., Dec. 24 

Wed., Dec. 25 

Thurs.-Fri., Dec. 26-27 

Sat, Dec. 28 

Sun., Dec. 29 

Mon. -Tues., Dec. 30-31 

Wed., Jan. 1 



Thurs. - Fri. 
Sat., Jan. 4 
Sun., Jan. 5 
Mon., Jan. 6 



Jan. 2-3 



8:00 a.m. -1:00 p.m. 

Closed 

8:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. 

8:00 a.m. -1:00 p.m. 

Closed 

8:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. 

8:00 a.m. -1:00 p.m. 

Closed 

8:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. 

Closed 

8:00 a.m. -5:00 p.m. 

8:00 a.m. -1:00 p.m. 

Closed 

Resume regular schedule 



Schedules for other campus libraries will be posted. 



S.U. ART EXHIBITION 
"GRAPHICS FOR COLLECTING" 

The Graphic Arts Committee of the Duke University 
Student Union is presently showing an exhibition of 
original prints on loan from the F. Roten Galleries, 
Incorporated, Baltimore, Maryland. It is a good sampling of 
the varied items one would expect to find in a major print 
gallery. The Committee hopes to acquaint the novice 
collector with the many possibilities available in the graphic 
arts in the lower price range. The works of many well 
known modern masters are included as well as some older 
prints, manuscripts, etc. 

All prints in this exhibition may be purchased and may 
be removed from the exhibit at the conclusion of its 
showing on December 19th. Arrangements for purchase 
may be made in Room 207 Flowers Building. 



SPRING SEMESTER 
CALENDAR INFORMATION 

Notices for events of recent scheduling for the 1969 
Spring Semester Calendar will be accepted in Room 207 
Flowers Building, the Calendar Office, through Thursday, 
December 19th. 



WEEKLY CALENDAR DEADLINE 

This is the final issue of the Duke University Calendar 
before the Christmas recess (December 21— January 6). The 
first calendar after the Christmas recess will cover the 
period from Sunday, January 5th through Sunday, January 
12th. Notices should be in the Calendar Office by 5:00 
p.m. on Monday, December 30th (instead of the usual 5:00 
p.m. Tuesday deadline). 



DUKE UNIVERSITY 

OFFICIAL EXAMINATION SCHEDULE 

FALL SEMESTER, 1968 

ANY STUDENT WISHING TO PETITION FOR RELIEF FROM THREE EXAMINATIONS WITHIN TWENTY-FOUR 
HOURS OR TWO EXAMINATIONS AT THE SAME TIME' MUST REPORT TO HIS DEAN'S OFFICE NOT LATER THAN 
DECEMBER 20, 1968, TO REQUEST A CHANGE IN SCHEDULE. 
Monday and Tuesday, January 13, and 14, 1969-Reading Period 

French, Spanish, German 63 

MWF-4 

Religion 1, IX 

TTS-4, Engineering 1.4-1.6 

History 1, IX 

MWF-3 

English 1 

TTS-6 

Physics 1, 41, 51 

Biology 1 

TTS-2 

MWF-2, Engineering 1.1-1.3 

Math 21, 21A 

TT-7 

MWF-5 

TTS-1 

Economics 1, 51 

MWF-7 

Air & Naval Science 

Chemistry 1, 41 

Language 1 

TTS-3 

P.S. 11 

MWF-6 

MWF-1 



Wednesday 


9:00-12:00 N 


15th 


2:00- 5:00 pm 




7:00-10:00 pm 


Thursday 


9:00-12:00 N 


16th 


2:00- 5:00 pm 




7:00-10:00 pm 


Friday 


9:00-12:00 N 


17th 


2:00- 5:00 pm 




7:00-10:00 pm 


Saturday 


9:00-12:00 N 


18th 


2:00- 5:00 pm 


Monday 


9:00-12:00 N 


20th 


2:00- 5:00 pm 




7:00-10:00 


Tuesday 


9:00-12:00 N 


21st 


2:00- 5:00 pm 




7:00-10:00 pm 


Wednesday 


9:00-12:00 N 


22nd 


2:00- 5:00 pm 




7:00-10:00 pm 


Thursday 


9:00-12:00 N 


23rd 


2:00- 5:00 pm 




7:00-10:00 pm 


Friday 


9:00-12:00 N 


24th 


2:00- 5:00 pm 



Chemistry and Biology (except Chemistry 1 and Biology 1) classes meet for examination at the time scheduled for their 
general lecture period. 

ANY EXAMINATION NOT COVERED IN THE FOREGOING SCHEDULE IS TO BE ARRANGED BY THE 
INSTRUCTOR IN CHARGE OF THE COURSE IN THE PERIOD BEGINNING JANUARY 15, 9:00 a.m. AND ENDING 
JANUARY 24, 5:00 p.m. NO EXAMINATION IS TO BE GIVEN BEFORE 9:00 a.m. JANUARY 15, WITH THE 
EXCEPTION OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION. NO CHANGE IS TO BE MADE IN ANY SCHEDULED EXAMINATION 
WITHOUT THE APPROVAL OF THE COMMITTEE. 

5 



MEDICAL CENTER LIBRARY 

HOLIDAY SCHEDULE 

1968-1969 



Saturday, December 21 
Sunday, December 22 

Monday, December 23 
Tuesday, December 24 

WEDNESDAY. DECEMBER 25 

Thursday, December 26 
Friday, December 27 

Saturday, December 28 
Sunday, December 29 

Monday, December 30 
Tuesday, December 31 



8:30 a.m. -5:00 p.m. 
1:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m. 

8:30 a.m. - 10:00 p.m. 
8:30 a.m. -1:00 p.m. 

CLOSED 

8:30 a.m. -10:00 p.m. 
8:30 a.m. - 10:00 p.m. 

8:30 a.m. -5:00 p.m. 
1:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m. 

8:30 a.m. - 10:00 p.m. 
8:30 a.m. -1:00 p.m. 



WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 1 

Thursday, January 2 
Friday, January 3 

Saturday, January 4 
Sunday, January 5 

Monday, January 6 



Closed 

8:30 a.m. - 10:00 p.m. 
8:30 a.m. -10:00 p.m. 

8:30a.m. -5:00 p.m. 
1:00 p.m. -5:00 p.m. 

Resume regular schedule 



December 6, 1968 



Number 13 



Published by Duke University Student Activities Department each week when school 
is in session. Subscriptions: S2.50 per year. Address inquiries to Box KM, Duke Station, 
Durham, North Carolina 27706. Application to mail at second class postage rates is 
pending at Durham. North Carolina. 

IMPORTANT-Notices for the Duke University Calendar should be submitted IN 
WRITTEN FORM to Room 207 Flowers Building, West Campus not later than 5:00 p.m., 
Tuesday. Extension 2911. 






Duke University 

CALENDAR^ 




Jan. 5-12, 1969 



Volume 69 



Published Jan. 3, 1969 



Number 1 



Sunday, January 5 

10:30—10:45 a.m. Carillon Recital. Mr. J. Samuel 

Hammond, University Carillonneur. 
11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship. University 

Chapel. Preacher: The Reverend Dr. D. Moody Smith, 

Jr., Associate Professor of New Testament. Sermon: 

"The Twelfth Day of Christmas." Broadcast over 

Radio Station WDNC and WDNC-FM. 
11:25 a.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Challenges in 

Education." WCHL Chapel Hill. Dr. Kenneth Clark will 

discuss "The Mountain of the Monks." 
4:00—6:00 p.m. International Open House. 2022 Campus 

Drive. 
7:30 p.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Challenges in 

Education." WPTF Raleigh. Dr. George Pearsall will 

discuss "New Dimensions in Materials Research." 



Monday, January 6 

9:30-11:00 a.m. WSGA Lounge Open. Lobby, East 

Campus Union. 
4:15—5:30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 

faculty, staff members, and students. 
5:15 p.m. Faculty Volleyball. Card Gymnasium. 
7:00 p.m. International Folk Dancing. The Ark, East 

Campus. 
8:00 p.m. Freshman Basketball: Duke vs. UNC. Indoor 

Stadium. 



Tuesday, January 7 

9:30-11:00 a.m. WSGA Lounge Open. Lobby, East 

Campus Union. 
10:00 a.m. Divinity School Chapel Service. University 

Chapel. Speaker: Dean 0. Kelly Ingram. Reader: Mr. 

John Peel. 
4:00 p.m. Forest Ecology Seminar. Room 130 Biological 

Sciences Building. Speaker: Dr. C. B. Davey. 
4:15—5:30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 

faculty, staff members, and students. 
7:30—10:00 p.m. Scottish Country Dancing. Presbyterian 

Student Center. 



Wednesday, January 8 

9:30-11:00 a.m. WSGA Lounge Open. Lobby, East 



Campus Union. 
10:00 a.m. Divinity School Chapel Service. University 

Chapel. Speaker: Dr. Daniel Schores. Reader: Mr. Ron 

Cyr. 
3:30 p.m. Duke University Concert Band presents Kiddies 

Konzert. Page Auditorium. 
4:15—5:30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 

faculty, staff members, and students. 
7:00—8:30 p.m. Chapel Choir Rehearsal. University 

Chapel. 
7:00—9:00 p.m. Open House Badminton for all men and 

women: faculty and students. East Campus 

Gymnasium. 



Thursday, January 9 

9:30-11:00 a.m. WSGA Lounge Open. Lobby, East 

Campus Union. 
10:00 a.m. Divinity School Chapel Service. University 

Chapel. Speaker: Dr. Fletcher Nelson. Reader: Mr. 

Greg Dell. 
4:15—5:30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 

faculty, staff members, and students. 
5:15 p.m. Faculty Volleyball. Card Gymnasium. 
8:00 p.m. Zoology Seminar. Auditorium, Biological 

Sciences Building. Speaker: Professor C. H. 

Waddington. 
8:00 p.m. Center for Southern Studies Symposium: " 'The 

Bible Belt' in Continuity and Change." Moot Court 

Room, Room 211, Law School. Speaker: Dr. Samuel 

S. Hill, Jr., UNC. 
8:15—9:30 p.m. West Campus Swimming Pool open to 

faculty members and their families. Faculty children 

will be admitted only when accompanied by their 

parents. 
8:00 p.m. Freshman "Y" Council Discussi on. K arl Zener 

Auditorium, Psychology— Sociology Building. 



Friday, January 10 

9:00 a.m. Center for Southern Studies Symposium: " 'The 
Bible Belt' in Continuity and Change." Moot Court 
Room, Room 211, Law School. Speakers: Dr. Thomas 
Hamilton, Old Dominion College; Dr. Edgar 
Thompson, Duke; Dr. Ann Scott, Duke. 

9:30-11:00 a.m. WSGA Lounge Open. Lobby, East 
Campus Union. 



Published by Duke University Student Activities Department, Box KM, Duke Station, Durham, M:C: 27706. 
each week when school is in session; Subscriptions: $2.50 per year. Address inquiries to Box KM, 
Duke Station. Durham, M.C. 27706. Application to mail at second class postage • rates is pending at 

Durham, N.C. 



10:00 a.m. Divinity School Chapel Service. University 
Chapel. Service of Holy Communion, Celebrant: Dr. 
McMurray Richey. 

2:00 p.m. Center for Southern Studies Symposium: " 'The 
Bible Belt' in Continuity and Change." Moot Court 
Room, Room 211, Law School. Speakers: Dr. Gay 
Capouch, Case Western Reserve University; Professor 
Michael C. Thomas, Washington and Lee University; 
Dr. Edwin S. Gaustad, Florida State University. 

3:30 p.m. Chemistry Staff Seminar. Room 130 
Psychology— Sociology Building. Speaker: Professor 
Jan Hermans, UNC. 

4:00 p.m. Southern Asian Studies Lecture on Jung and 
Yoga. Room 139 Social Science Building. Speaker: Dr. 
J. T. F. Jordens 

4:15—5:30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. Faculty 
daughters, ages 6 to 16, may also swim; those 10 and 
under must be accompanied by their mothers. 

7:00—9:00 p.m. Open House Badminton for all men and 
women: faculty and students. East Campus 
Gymnasium. 

7:30 p.m. Center for Southern Studies Symposium: " 'The 
Bible Belt' in Continuity and Change." Moot Court 
Room, Room 211, Law School. Speakers: Father 
Charles O'Neill, Loyola University; Dr. Leonard 
Dinnerstein, Fairleigh Dickinson University; Professor 
Joseph Washington, Albion College. 

8:00 p.m. S.U. Cinematic Arts Film Series: 
"GOLDSTEIN" directed by Philip Kaufman and Ben 
Manaster. This film won the Prix de la Nouvelle at the 
1964 Cannes Festival, clearly establishing an 
international spot for the American "underground 
cinema." Filmed in Chicago, "Goldstein" appears to 
some to be a legend based on the Hebrew tale of the 
prophet Elijah— other critics see the film as a satire "in 
which a young hero says yes to life by running from 
scene to scene at top speed." This film takes your mind 
— bends it, molds it, shocks it, laughs at it — and 
throws it back, laughing as you wonder where you've 
been. 

"DOUBLE WHOOPEE." Laurel and Hardy are hotel 
employees in one of their comedies written by Leo 
McCarey. Jean Harlow plays a bit part, and a high spot 
is the fantastic parody on Erich von Stroheim. 



Saturday, January 11 



9:00 a.m. Center for Southern Studies Symposium: " 'The 
Bible Belt' in Continuity and Change." Moot Court 
Room, Room 211, Law School. Speakers: Dr. J. 
Christopher Crocker, Duke; Dr. James Peacock, UNC; 
Dr. Berton H. Kaplan, UNC; Dr. Charles Hudson, 
University of Georgia; Dr. Weston La Barre, Duke. 

10: o5 a.m. Duke University Radio Program "Challenges in 
Education." WDNC Durham. Dr. Kenneth Clark will 
discuss "The Mountain of the Monks." 

12: 30 p.m. Fall Semester classes end. 

3:00—5:00 p.m. East Campus Gymnasium: Open to 
students, faculty, and staff for recreation (swimming, 
badminton, volleyball, basketball, table tennis). 

6:00 p.m. Freshman Basketball: Duke vs. Old Dominion. 
Indoor Stadium. 

7:00 and 9:15 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page Auditorium. 
"THE GOSPEL ACCORDING TO ST. MATTHEW." 
"Great telling of the Christ story. A realistic, simply 
told story hauntingly photographed in cinema-verite 
fashion with non-professionals as cast. Script is text 



from Matthew. A deeply reverent masterpiece." 
Directed by Pier Paolo Pasolini. 
8:00 p.m. Varsity Basketball: Duke vs. University of 
Maryland. Indoor Stadium. 



Sunday, January 12 



10:30-10:45 a.m. Carillon RecitaL Mi. J. Samuel 
Hammond, University Carillonneur. 

11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship. University 
Chapel. Preacher: The Reverend Dr. W. Arthur Kale, 
Professor of Christian Education. Broadcast over Radio 
Station WDNC and WDNC-FM. 

11:25 a.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Challenges in 
Education." WCHL Chapel Hill. Captain Eugene 
Mitchell and Dr. Herbert Saltzman will discuss "A 
Saturation Dive." 

4:00—6:00 p.m. International Open House. 2022 Campus 
Drive. 

7:00 and 9:15 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page Auditorium. 
"THE GOSPEL ACCORDING TO ST. MATTHEW." 
"Great telling of the Christ story. A realistic, simply 
told story hauntingly photographed in cinema-verite 
fashion with non-professionals as cast. Script is text 
from Matthew. A deeply reverent masterpiece." 
Directed by Pier Paolo Pasolini. 

7:30 p.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Challenges in 
Education." WPTF Raleigh. Dr. Chester Zmijewski will 
discuss "Tissue Typing for Transplants." 



NOTICES for the Duke University Calendar should 
be submitted IN WRITTEN FORM to Room 207 
Flowers Building, not later than 5 p.m., Tuesday, Ext 
2911. 



FOREST ECOLOGY SEMINAR 

Dr. C. B. Davey, Professor of Forest Soils, Department 
of Soil Science, North Carolina State University, will 
present a talk on "Predisposition to Disease Resistance" at 
the Forest Ecology Seminar on Tuesday, January 7th, at 
4:00 p.m. in Room 130 Biological Sciences Building. 



DUKE UNIVERSITY CONCERT BAND 
KIDDIES KONZERT 

On Wednesday afternoon, January 8th, at 3:30 p.m., the 
Duke Concert Band will present a kiddies Konzert with a 
program especially designed to appeal to children of 
grammar school age. The program is entitled "Your Musical 
Imagination" and will feature "The Carnival of The 
Animals" by Saint-Saens to encourage the audience to use 
their ears and their mind's eye in determining which animal 
is being portrayed by each section of the suite. 

Paul Bryan will conduct the concert. Flute soloists for 
the Telemann Suite will be Elizabeth Rock and Janet Steel; 
William Gudger will assist on harpsichord. Student 
conductor, Kern Holoman, will direct several selections 



from "The Carnival of The Animals." "Prologue" is a new 
composition by sophomore Edgar Williams, Mary Duke 
Biddle Scholar. 

The program is presented without charge. Parents are 
cordially invited to come and bring their school children. 

The program follows: 
"Radetzky" (March) Johann Strauss 

"Prologue" Edgar Williams 

"Suite for Flute in A Minor" 

Con brio (Overture) G. F. Telemann 

"The Carnival of The Animals" Camille Saint-Saens 
March??? (Try to guess) John Philip Sousa 



ZOOLOGY SEMINAR 

The Department of Zoology will hold a special seminar 
on Thursday, January 9th, at 8:00 p.m. in the Auditorium 
of the Biological Sciences Building. Professor C. H. 
Waddington, Buchanan Professor of Genetics and Director 
of the Institute of Animal Genetics, Edinburgh University, 
will speak on "Painting and Science in the 20th Century." 
Professor Waddington is a distinguished and internationally 
well-known scientist, who has also been interested in the 
relationship between the arts and the sciences. It is his 
thesis that modern painting has developed in a world in 
which science has become one of the major cultural 
influences and painters have been strongly influenced by 
science, or at least what they thought science to be. 
Professor Waddington's lecture will be illustrated with a 
large collection of slides of modern paintings. The members 
of the University Community and the public are cordially 
invited to attend. 



CENTER FOR SOUTHERN STUDIES 

SYMPOSIUM: "THE BIBLE BELT" 

IN CONTINUITY AND CHANGE 

CENTER FOR SOUTHERN STUDIES 

The Center for Southern Studies in the Social Sciences 
and the Humanities, formally established at Duke 
University on July 1, 1965, is a natural outgrowth of 
scholarly interest in the South which goes far back into the 
early history of this institution when it was Trinity College. 
Now that the region is undergoing very rapid and 
fundamental change, the University has sought to meet the 
new challenges involved by authorizing the Center and 
charging it with responsibility for promoting an intellectual 
establishment encompassing functions in research, 
education, training, and policy. 

The Center for Southern Studies in the Social Sciences 
and the Humanities, with assistance from Dr. Samuel 
Southard (Director of Research of the General Council of 
the Presbyterian Church of the United States, Atlanta, 
Georgia) and Dr. Samuel S. Hill, Jr., (Chairman of the 
Department of Religion at the University of North Carolina 
at Chapel Hill), announces a three day symposium, " 'The 
Bible Belt' in Continuity and Change" in which social 
scientists will examine some aspects of the church and 
religion in the South. All sessions will be held in the Moot 
Court Room, Room 211 of the Duke University Law 
School and are open to the public without charge. The 
schedule follows: 



Thursday, January 9 

8:00 p.m. Presiding: Dr. John McKinney, Duke University 

Address: "Religion and the Solid South," Dr. 
Samuel S. Hill, Jr., University of North 
Carolina 

Commentary: Dr. Edward Tiryakian, Duke 
University 

Friday, January 10 

9:00 a.m. Presiding: Dr. Shelton Smith, Duke University 

"The Radical Roots of Religious Orthodoxy in 
the South," Dr. Thomas Hamilton, Old 
Dominion College 

"The Church and the Plantation System," Dr. 
Edgar Thompson, Duke University 

Coffee Break 

"Women, Religion, and Social Change," Dr. Ann 
Scott, Duke University 

2:00 p.m. Presiding: Dr. Robert Durden, Duke University 

"The Correlates of Church Attendance in the 
South," Dr. Gay Capouch, Case Western 
Reserve University 

"Determinants of Attitudes Toward Social 
Change: Southern Baptists and Regional 
Development," Professor Michael C. Thomas, 
Washington and Lee University 

Coffee Break 

"Religious Demography of the South," Dr. 
Edwin S. Gaustad, Florida State University 

7:30 p.m. Presiding: Dr. Henry Clark, Duke University 

Some Departures from the White Protestant 

Mainstream 
"Catholicism," Father Charles O'Neill, Loyola 

University 
"Judaism," Dr. Leonard Dinnerstein, Fairleigh 

Dickinson University 
"Negro Christianity," Professor Joseph 

Washington, Albion College 
Saturday, January 1 1 

9:00 a.m. Presiding: Dr. Samuel Southard, General Council 
of the Presbyterian Church of the United 
States, Atlanta, Georgia 

Varieties of Religious Behavior and Belief in the 

South 
"The Southern Way of Death," Dr. J. 

Christopher Crocker, Duke University 
"Salvation Beliefs and Mental Illness in the 

South," Dr. James Peacock, University of 

North Carolina 
"Religion: the Traditional and the Modern," Dr. 

Berton H. Kaplan, University of North 

Carolina 

Coffee Break 

"Fate and Supernatural Justice in a 
Fundamentalist Christian Belief System," Dr. 
Charles Hudson, University of Georgia 

"The Snake-handling Sect of the Southeast Dr. 
Weston La Barre, Duke University 



FRESHMAN "Y" COUNCIL DISCUSSION 
MEN'S LIVING OPTIONS 

The Freshman "Y" Council will present a discussion of 
men's living options at Duke on Thursday, January 9th at 
8:00 p.m. in the Karl Zener Auditorium 
(Psychology— Sociology Building). Four upperclass students 
will comprise the panel and include Frazer Owen, President 
of AIH; Kerry Roche, President of IFC; Tom Scrivener, an 
Independent, and Andy Thomson, an off-campus resident. 
After a brief presentation by each living unit representative, 
the panel will be open to questioning. 



CHEMISTRY STAFF SEMINAR 

Professor Jan Hermans, Department of Biochemistry, 
University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, will speak at the 
Chemistry Staff Seminar on Friday, January 10th, in Room 
130 of the Psychology-Sociology Building at 3:30 p.m. The 
subject of Professor Hermans' address will be "Packing of 
Crystals and Protein Molecules". All interested persons are 
cordially invited to attend. 



STUDENT UNION EXHIBITION 

CREATIVE ART 

BY STUDENTS OF ZEREN EARLS 

Eye-catching collages, original mobiles, and water-color 
paintings along with a varied sampling of sculptures and 
other constructions make up an exhibition of nearly 200 
creative art works by students of Zeren Earls, wife of Duke 
composer Paul Earls. 

Sponsored by the Graphic Arts Committee of the 
Student Union, the exhibition in the Womans' College 
Library Gallery is open to all during regular library hours 
through January. 

Mrs. Earls teaches classes for beginning art students from 
4 to 15 years of age as well as for parents at the Methodist 
Student Center on Oregon Street. She also has a special 
class for adults in the Fundamentals of Art. 

Designed to help beginners explore their own interests 
and aptitudes and to introduce them to fundamentals of 
creative artistic expression, the adult class helps develop 
competence in elementary artistic processes and techniques, 
with experiments in painting, modeling, collage, 
three-dimensional construction, and graphic processes. 

Mrs. Earls begins a new teaching session on Feb. 10, with 
the added feature of a workshop course in the development 
of creative programs for children from 4-14 years of age. 
The course, to be given Saturday mornings for two hours 
throught the semester, is designed especially to appeal to 
interested group leaders of Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts, day 
camps, community volunteers, and to teachers in need of 
refresher training in methods, materials, and contemporary 
processes. 

SOUTHERN ASIAN STUDIES 
LECTURE ON JUNG AND YOGA 

A public lecture by Dr. J. T. F. Jordens, Senior Lecturer, 
Department of Indian Studies, University of Melbourne, 
and presently visiting lecturer in Indian Religions at the 
University of Wisconsin, will be held on Friday, January 
10th at 4:00 p.m. in Room 139 of the Social Science 
Building. Dr. Jordens is the author of several books on 



Indian religion and contributed an article on "The Origins 
of Yoga and its Classical Expression" in The Place of Yoga 
in Western Society. This lecture is one of a public lecture 
series sponsored by the Program in Comparative Studies on 
Southern Asia and the public is cordially invited. 



ERASMUS CLUB 
SPRING SCHEDULE 

The Erasmus Club announces its spring meetings 
schedule. All sessions will meet in the Green Room, East 
Duke Building at 8:15 p.m. The schedule follows: 
Mon., Feb. 3, 1969 Professor W. D. Davies 
Mon., Mar. 3, 1969 Professor G. Smith 
Mon., April 7, 1969 To be announced 
Mon., May 5, 1969 To be announced 



APPOINTMENTS AVAILABLE 
UNESCO TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE 

Information has been received by the University about 
temporary positions available for faculty members with a 
minimum of from five to ten years experience through the 
United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural 
Organization for technical assistance in education to many 
of the developing countries in Latin America, the Near 
East, South Asia, the Far East and Africa. Further 
information about these positions which are for periods of 
one to two years is available in Room 220 Allen Building, 
or through contacting Charles N. St. John, Jr., UNESCO 
Program Specialist, Institute of International Studies, 
Department of Health, Education and Welfare, Office of 
Education, Washington, D. C. 20202. 



FERDINAND ROTEN GALLERIES 
ORIGINAL PRINTS SALE-EXHIBITION 

An exhibition of original prints by classic and 
contemporary artists will be presented by Ferdinand Roten 
Galleries of Baltimore, Maryland, in Room 101 West Union 
Building from 10:00 a.m. until 7:00 p.m., on Tuesday, 
January 14th. The sale-exhibition is under the auspicies of 
the Student Union's Graphic Arts Committee. 

Prices range from $5 to $1000 with the majority priced 
under $100. The exhibition includes over 1000 original 
etchings, lithographs and woodcuts by such artists as 
Picasso, Chagall, Miro, Goya, Renoir, Baskin, Kollwitz and 
many others. Also on display will be a collection of 
outstanding Western and Oriental manuscript pages from 
works of the 13th — 20th centuries. A representative of the 
Roten Galleries, G. Murphy, will be present at the 
exhibition to answer any questions the public may have 
regarding graphic art and printmaking. 

Established in 1932, Roten Galleries has one of the 
largest collections of graphic art in the country and 
specializes in arranging exhibitions and sales of original 
graphics at colleges, universities and museums throughout 
the country. 



DUKE UNIVERSITY 

OFFICIAL EXAMINATION SCHEDULE 

FALL SEMESTER, 1968 



ANY STUDENT WISHING TO PETITION FOR RELIEF FROM THREE EXAMINATIONS WITHIN TWENTY-FOUR 
HOURS OR TWO EXAMINATIONS AT THE SAME TIME' MUST REPORT TO HIS DEAN'S OFFICE NOT LATER THAN 
DECEMBER 20, 1968, TO REQUEST A CHANGE IN SCHEDULE. 
Monday and Tuesday, January 13, and 14, 1969-Reading Period 

French, Spanish, German 63 

MWF-4 

Religion 1, IX 

TTS-4, Engineering 1.4-1.6 

History 1, IX 

MWF-3 

English 1 

TTS-6 

Physics 1, 41, 51 

Biology 1 

TTS-2 

MWF-2, Engineering 1.1-1.3 

Math 21, 21A 

TT-7 

MWF-5 

TTS-1 

Economics 1, 51 

MWF-7 

Air & Naval Science 

Chemistry 1, 41 

Language 1 

TTS-3 

P.S. 11 

MWF-6 

MWF-1 



Wednesday 


9:00-12:00 N 


15th 


2:00- 5:00 pm 




7:00-10:00 pm 


Thursday 


9:00-12:00 N 


16th 


2:00- 5:00 pm 




7:00-10:00 pm 


Friday 


9:00-12:00 N 


17th 


2:00- 5:00 pm 




7:00-10:00 pm 


Saturday 


9:00-12:00 N 


18th 


2:00- 5:00 pm 


Monday 


9:00-12:00 N 


20th 


2:00- 5:00 pm 




7:00-10:00 


Tuesday 


9:00-12:00 N 


21st 


2:00- 5:00 pm 




7:00-10:00 pm 


Wednesday 


9:00-12:00 N 


22nd 


2:00- 5:00 pm 




7:00-10:00 pm 


Thursday 


9:00-12:00 N 


23rd 


2:00- 5:00 pm 




7:00-10:00 pm 


Friday 


9:00-12:00 N 


24th 


2:00- 5:00 pm 



Chemistry and Biology (except Chemistry 1 and Biology 1) classes meet for examination at the time scheduled for their 
general lecture period. 

ANY EXAMINATION NOT COVERED IN THE FOREGOING SCHEDULE IS TO BE ARRANGED BY THE 
INSTRUCTOR IN CHARGE OF THE COURSE IN THE PERIOD BEGINNING JANUARY 15, 9:00 a.m. AND ENDING 
JANUARY 24, 5:00 p.m. NO EXAMINATION IS TO BE GIVEN BEFORE 9:00 a.m. JANUARY 15, WITH THE 
EXCEPTION OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION. NO CHANGE IS TO BE MADE IN ANY SCHEDULED EXAMINATION 
WITHOUT THE APPROVAL OF THE COMMITTEE. 



SUMMER 1969 
EUROPEAN GROUP FLIGHTS 

For the eighth consecutive year, the Student Activities 
Office 202-A Flowers Building, is offering Duke European 
Group Fare Flights to members of the Duke University 
Community (faculty, staff, students, and employees). The 
Activities Office will provide tickets only for economy class 
jet air transportation. All other arrangements are the 
responsibility of the individual. 

All faculty, staff, students, and employees of Duke 
University are eligible who have been associated with Duke 
for six months prior to departure times. 



Dates... 

Flight 1 (Wash.,) Pan Am June 9 (Paris) Pan Am Aug. 26 
Flight 2 (NYC) Air India June 9(London) ir India Aug. 28 
Flight 3 (NYC) Air India June 10 (Lon.) Air India July 14 
Flight 4 (NYC) Pan Am July 23 (London) Pan Am Aug. 27 



Fares... 



Minimum of 25 Persons 



NYC to London 

Adult $300.00 

Child (12 & over). ...300.00 

Child (2-11) 150.00 

Child (under 2) 30.00 



Washington to Paris 

Adult $363.80 

Child (12 & over) ...363.80 

Child (2-11) 181.90 

Child (under 2) 36.40 

Minimum of 50 persons 
NYC to London Washington to Paris 

Adult $245.00 Adult $297.80 

Child ( 12 & over) ...245.00 Child ( 12 & over) ...297.80 

Child (2-11) 122.50 Child (2-11) 148.90 

Child (under 12) 24.50 Child (under 2) 29.80 

(All fares are effective as of 1 April 1968) 

Child's fare is based on age on date of flight departure. 
No deposit required for children under 12. 

Application forms are available at the Flowers 
Information Desk and Room 207 Flowers Building. 



Application to mail at second class postage rate is 
pending at Durham, North Carolina. 



Duke University 

CALENDAR. 




Jan. 12-19, 1969 



Volume 69 



Published Jan. 10, 1969 



Number 2 



Sunday, January 12 



10:30-10:45 a.m. Carillon Recital. Mr. J. Samuel 
Hammond, University Carillonneur. 

11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship. University 
Chapel. Preacher: The Reverend Dr. W. Arthur Kale, 
Professor of Christian Education. Sermon: "Man's 
Continuing Glory, Shame, and Hope." Broadcast over 
Radio Station WDNC and WDNC-FM. 

11:25 a.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Challenges in 
Education." WCHL Chapel Hill. Captain Eugene 
Mitchell and Dr. Herbert Saltzman will discuss "A 
Saturation Dive." 

4:00—6:00 p.m. International Open House. 2022 Campus 
Drive. 

7:00 and 9:15 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page Auditorium. 
"THE GOSPEL ACCORDING TO ST. MATTHEW." 
"Great telling of the Christ story. A realistic, simply 
told story hauntingly photographed in cinema-verite 
fashion with non-professionals as cast. Script is text 
from Matthew. A deeply reverent masterpiece." 
Directed by Pier Paolo Pasolini. 

7:30 p.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Challenges in 
Education." WPTF Raleigh. Dr. Chester Zmijewski will 
discuss "Tissue Typing for Transplants." 



Monday, January 13 



4:15—5:30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 

faculty, staff members, and students. 
5:15 p.m. Faculty Volleyball. Card Gymnasium. 
7:00 p.m. Internationa] Folk Dancing. The Ark, East 

Campus. 
7:30 p.m. AAUW Meeting. YMCA, Chapel Hill Street. 

Speaker: Mr. Eugene Hampton, Jr. 

Tuesday, January 14 



10:00 a.m.— 7:00 p.m. Ferdinand Roten Galleries Original 

Prints Sale-Exhibition. Room 101 West Union 

Building. 
1:30 p.m. Campus Club Meeting. Guest Day Dessert 

University House, 1508 Pinecrest Road. Speaker: Mrs. 

Deryl Hart. 



4:00 p.m. Gerontology Seminar. Room 1504 Gerontology 
Building, Duke Hospital. Speaker: Dr. Klaus F. Riegel. 

4:15—5:30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. 

7:30—10:00 p.m. Scottish Country Dancing. Presbyterian 
Student Center. 



Wednesday, January 15 

2:00 p.m. The final examination of Mr. James Benjamin 

Wood for the Ph.D. degree in History. Room 117 Allen 

Building. 
4:00 p.m. Psychology Colloquium Karl Zener Auditorium. 

Room 130 Psychology-Sociology Building. Speaker: 

Dr. E. G. Jones. 
4:15-5:30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 

faculty, staff members, and students. 
7:00-8:30 p.m. Chapel Choir Rehearsal. University 

Chapel. 
7:00—9:00 p.m. Open House Badminton for all men and 

women: faculty and students. East Campus 

Gymnasium. 

Thursday, January 16 

12:30 p.m. Kappa Delta Pi Luncheon Meeting. East 
Campus Union. Speaker: Dr. Carl Eisdorfer. 

4:15—5:30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. 

5:00 p.m. Dean's Hour. Hospital Amphitheater. Speaker: 
Dr. Jordan J. Baruch. 

5:15 p.m. Faculty Volleyball. Card Gymnasium. 

8:15—9:30 p.m. West Campus Swimming Pool open to 
faculty members and their families. Faculty children 
will be admitted only when accompanied by their 
parents. 



Friday, January 17 



900 a.m. The final examination of Mrs. Diane Oakerson 
Fleming for the Ph.D. degree in Microbiology. Old 
Administrative Conference Room, Medical Center. 

4:00 p.m. Botany Seminar. Auditorium, Biological 
Sciences Building. Speaker: Professor R. O. Slatyer. 



4:15—5:30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. Faculty 
daughters, ages 6 to 16, may also swim; those 10 and 
under must be accompanied by their mothers. 

7:00—9:00 p.m. Open House Badminton" for all men and 
women: faculty and students. East Campus 
Gymnasium. 

Saturday, January 18 

10:55 a.m. Duke University Radio Program "Challenges in 
Education." WDNC Durham. Captain Eugene Mitchell 
and Dr. Herbert Saltzman will discuss "A Saturation 
Dive." 

3:00—5:00 p.m. East Campus Gymnasium: Open to 
students, faculty, and staff for recreation (swimming, 
badminton, volleyball, basketball, table tennis). 

7:00 and 9:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page Auditorium. 
"WHAT'S UP TIGER LILY." Woody Allen's 
substituting English gags for dialogue of Japanese-made 
spy film. "Very funny — refreshingly original" 
—Judith Crist, World Journal Tribune. "Allen's sense of 
fun is at once low-keyed, far-out, and hip!" —Knight, 
Saturday Review. 

8:15 p.m. The Chamber Arts Society: Borodin String 
Quartet from Moscow. Music Room, East Duke 
Building. 

Sunday, January 19 

10:30-10:45 a.m. Carillon Recital. Mr. J. Samuel 

Hammond, University Carillonneur. 
11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship. University 

Chapel. Preacher: The Reverend Elmer O. Hall, 

Assistant Chaplain to the University. Broadcast over 

Radio Station WDNC and WDNC-FM. 
11:25 a.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Challenges in 

Education." WCHL Chapel Hill. Miss Kathleen Merry 

will discuss "The Research Arm of a Legal Clinic." 
4:00—6:00 p.m. International Open House. 2022 Campus 

Drive. 
7:00 and 9:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page Auditorium. 

"WHAT'S UP TIGER LILY." 
7:30 p.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Challenges in 

Educatioa" WPTF Raleigh. Dr. Kenneth Clark will 

discuss "The Mountain of the Monks." 



NOTICES for the Duke University Calendar 
should be submitted IN WRITTEN FORM to Room 
207 Flowers Building, not later than 5 p.m.. Tuesday, 
Ext 2911. 



Published by Duke University Student Activities 
Department, Box KM, Duke Station, Durham, N.C., 
27706 each week when school is in session; 
Subscriptions: $2.50 per year. Address inquiries to 
Box KM, Duke Station, Durham, N.C., 27706. 
Application to mail at second class postage rates is 
pending at Durham, N.C. 



UNIVERSITY SERVICE OF WORSHIP 

The Reverend Dr. W. Arthur Kale, Professor of Christian 
Education, will deliver the sermon at the University Service 
of Worship on Sunday, January 12th, at 11:00 a.m. in the 
University Chapel. The sermon topic is "Man's Continuing 
Glory, Shame, and Hope." 



RELIGIOUS ORGANIZATIONS 
ANNOUNCEMENTS 






EPISCOPAL CENTER (UCM). 8:00 a.m. Sunday, 
January 12th. Holy Communion. 

9:15 a.m. Choral Eucharist and sermon. The Duke Women's 
Chorus, under the direction of Mr. James Young, will sing 
Virgil Thompson's "Mass" for two-part chorus and 
percussion. Mr. David Pumphrey will be the percussionist 
The University Community is invited to attend this service. 
5:15 p.m. Thursday, January 16th. Holy Communion. 

CATHOLIC. 9:30 a.m. Sunday, January 12th and 19th. 
Mass, Room 130 Psychology-Sociology Building. 
Confession before Mass from 9:00 — 9:25 a.m. Room 144 
Psychology -Sociology Building. 

12:40 p.m. Daily Mass. Monday, Wednesday, and Friday. 
Room 208 Flowers Building. Tuesday and Thursday. New 
Hospital Chapel. 

BAHA'I FAITH. 6:00 p.m. Sunday, January 12th. 
Prayer and Meditation. 

6:30 p.m. Discussion: "The Promised Day is Come" 
followed by refreshments during fellowship hour. 
5:30 p.m. Sunday, January 19th. Discussion: "Building A 
New World." Speaker: Dr. James T. Taylor, Executive 
Secretary of the North Carolina Good Neighbor Council. 
Friends Meeting House, 404 Alexander Avenue. 



AAUW MEETING 

The American Association of University Women, 
Durham Branch, will meet on Monday, January 13th, at 
7:30 p.m. at the YWCA on Chapel Hill Street. The 
discussion will center around "Problems Relating to 
Housing in Durham" led by Mr. Eugene Hampton, Jr., 
Chairman of the Housing Committee, Durham Council on 
Human Relations. All women college graduates in the 
Durham area are invited to attend. 



FERDINAND ROTEN GALLERIES 
ORIGINAL PRINTS SALE-EXHIBITION 

An exhibition of original prints by classic and 
contemporary artists will be presented by Ferdinand Roten 
Galleries of Baltimore, Maryland, in Room 101 West Union 
Building from 10:00 a.m. until 7:00 p.m., on Tuesday, 
January 14th. The sale-exhibition is under the auspicies of 
the Student Union's Graphic Arts Committee. 

Prices range from $5 to $1000 with the majority priced 
under $100. The exhibition includes over 1000 original 
etchings, lithographs and woodcuts by such artists as 
Picasso, Chagall, Miro, Goya, Renoir, Baskin, Kollwitz and 
many others. Also on display will be a collection of 
outstanding Western and Oriental manuscript pages from 



works of the 13th — 20th centuries. A representative of the 
Roten Galleries, G. Murphy, will be present at the 
exhibition to answer any questions the public may have- 
regarding graphic art and printmaking. 

Established in 1932, Roten Galleries has one of the 
largest collections of graphic art in the country and 
specializes in arranging exhibitions and sales of original 
graphics at colleges, universities and museums throughout 
the country. 



CAMPUS CLUB MEETING 
GUEST DAY DESSERT 

The Campus Club of Duke University will have a dessert 
on Tuesday, January 14th, at 1:30 p.m. at the University 
House, 1508 Pinecrest Road. Members are reminded that 
they may invite guests. Mrs. Deryl Hart will speak. 
Happiness Outside the Market Place is her topic. Mrs. C. E. 
Llewellyn is chairman for the event. The hostess 
department is Psychiatry. 



GERONTOLOGY SEMINAR 

Dr. Klaus F. Riegel, Director, Language Development 
Program, Center for Human Growth and Development, 
University of Michigan, will speak on "The Ecology of 
Bilingual Development" at the Duke University Council on 
Aging and Human Development. This open seminar will be 
held on Tuesday, January 14, at 4:00 p.m. 4:00 p.m. in 
Room 1504 Gerontology Building, Duke Hospital. The 
public is cordially invited to attend. 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. James Benjamin Wood for 
the Ph.D. degree in History will be held on Wednesday, 
January 15th at 2:00 p.m. in Room 117 Allen Building. 
The subject of Mr. Wood's dissertation is "The American 
Response To China, 1784-1844: Consensus Policy And The 
Origin Of The East India Squadron." The committee to 
conduct the examination consists of Professors Theodore 
Ropp, John Tate Lanning, Richard L. Watson and J. Harris 
Proctor. Professor Ropp will preside. 

PSYCHOLOGY COLLOQUIUM 

The Department of Psychology will hold a colloquium 
on Wednesday, January 15th, at 4:00 p.m. in the Karl E. 
Zener Auditorium, Room 130, Psychology— Sociology 
Building. Dr. E. G. Jones, Department of Human Anatomy, 
University of Oxford, will speak on "Aspects of the 
Intrinsic Organization of the Somatic Sensory Pathway in 
the Thalamus and Cerebral Cortex: Light and Electron 
Microscopic Observations." 



KAPPA DELTA PI LUNCHEON MEETING 
Kappa Delta Pi, Education Honorary, will hold 



its 



monthly meeting in the East Campus Union on Thursday, 



January 16th, at 12:30 p.m. Dr. Carl Eisdorfer of the 
Department of Psychiatry will speak on "Education for the 
Older Generation." Everyone is invited. 



DEAN'S HOUR 

The Dean's Hour will be held on Thursday, January 
16th, at 5:00 p.m. in the Hospital Amphitheater. Dr. 
Jordan J. Baruch, President, EDUCOM, Boston, 
Massachusetts, will speak on "EDUCOM and Medical 
Education." 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mrs. Diane Oakerson Fleming 
for the Ph.D. degree in Microbiology will be held on Friday, 
January 17th at 9:00 a.m. in Old Administrative 
Conference Room, Medical Center. The subject of Mrs. 
Fleming's dissertation is " In Vitro Experimental Effects Of 
Radiocobalt 60 On Rabbit Polymorphonuclear 
Leucocytes." The committee to conduct the examination 
consists of Professors Suydam Osterhout, Eugene Day 
Norman F. Conant, H. Stewart Nielsen and William 
O'Fallon. Professor Osterhout will preside. 



BOTANY SEMINAR 

Professor R. O. Slatyer of the Australian National 
University will speak on "Stomatal Closure and 
Dehydration in Relation to Photosynthesis in 
Water-Stressed Plants" at the Botany Seminar on Friday, 
January 17th, at 4:00 p.m. in the Auditorium of the 
Biological Sciences Building. Professor Slatyer was for 
many years with CSIRO, the Commonwealth Scientific and 
Industrial Research Organization of Australia. Last year he 
became a professor in the Research School of Biological 
Sciences of the Australian National University of Canberra. 
He is well known all over the world for his research on 
plant water relationships. 



CHAMBER ARTS SOCIETY 
BORODIN STRING QUARTET FROM MOSCOW 

The Chamber Arts Society will present the fourth 
concert of the season, to be played by the Borodin String 
Quartet from Moscow, Saturday, January 18th at 8:15 p.m. 
in the Music Room, East Duke Building. The musicians are 
Rostislav Dubinsky and Jaroslav Alexandres (violins), 
Dimitri Shebalin (viola), and Valentin Berlinsky (cello). The 
program follows: 

Quartet No. 1 in A major Borodin 

Quartet No. 7 in F sharp minor, 

Opus 108 Shostakovich 

Quartet in C major, Opus 59, 

No. 3 Beethoven 

Admission is by Membership Card or Guest Card. Guest 
Cards in limited number, up to the total room capacity of 
430 seats, will be available from 7:30 to 8:00 p.m. at the 
door of the Music Room before the concert. Guest Cards 
are priced at $2.50 for a single admission, and may not be 



reserved in advance except by members of the Society. 

Inquiries may be addressed to The Chamber Arts Society, 

Box 6065, College Station. 

Other chamber music concerts scheduled for this season 

include: 

Saturday, February 8th Igor Kipnis (Harpsichord) 
Saturday, March 22nd Fine Arts Quartet 

SUMMER 1969 
EUROPEAN GROUP FLIGHTS 

For the eighth consecutive year, the Student Activities 
Office 202-A Flowers Building, is offering Duke European 
Group Fare Flights to members of the Duke University 
Community (faculty, staff, students, and employees). The 
Activities Office will provide tickets only for economy class 
jet air transportation. All other arrangements are the 
responsibility of the individual. 

All faculty, staff, students, and employees of Duke 
University are eligible who have been associated with Duke 
for six months prior to departure times. 

Dates... 

Flight 1 (Wash.,) Pan Am June 9 (Paris) Pan Am Aug. 26 
Flight 2 (NYC) Air India June 9( London) ir India Aug. 28 
Flight 3 (NYC) Air India June 10 (Lon.) Air India July 11 
Flight 4 (NYC) Pan Am July 23 (London) Pan Am Aug. 27 

Fares... 

Minimum of 25 Persons 



NYC to London 

Adult $300.00 

Child ( 12 & over).... 300.00 

Child (2-11) 150.00 

Child (under 2) 30.00 



Washington to Paris 

Adult $363.80 

Child (12 & over) ...363.80 

Child (2-11) 181.90 

Child (under 2) 36.40 

Minimum of 50 persons 



NYC to London 



Washington to Paris 



Adult $245.00 Adult $297.80 

Child (12 & over) ...245.00 Child (12 & over) ...297.80 

Child (2-11) 122.50 Child (2-11) 148.90 

Child (under 12) 24.50 Child (under 2) 29.80 

(All fares are effective as of 1 April 1968) 

Child's fare is based on age on date of flight departure. 
No deposit required for children under 12. 

Application forms are available at the Flowers 
Information Desk and Room 207 Flowers Building. 



STUDENT UNION EXHIBITION 

CREATIVE ART 

BY STUDENTS OF ZEREN EARLS 

Eye-catching collages, original mobiles, and water-color 
paintings along with a varied sampling of sculptures and 
other constructions make up an exhibition of nearly 200 
creative art works by students of Zeren Earls, wife of Duke 
composer Paul Earls. 

Sponsored by the Graphic Arts Committee of the 
Student Union, the exhibition in the Womans' College 
Library Gallery is open to all during regular library hours 
through January. 



Mrs. Earls teaches classes for beginning art students from 
4 to 15 years of age as well as for parents at the Methodist 
Student Center on Oregon Street. She also has a special 
class for adults in the Fundamentals of Art. 

Designed to help beginners explore their own interests 
and aptitudes and to introduce them to fundamentals of 
creative artistic expression, the adult class helps develop 
competence in elementary artistic processes and techniques, 
with experiments in painting, modeling, collage, 
three-dimensional construction, and graphic processes. 

Mrs. Earls begins a new teaching session on Feb. 10, with 
the added feature of a workshop course in the development 
of creative programs for children from 4-14 years of age. 
The course, to be given Saturday mornings for two hours 
through the semester, is designed especially to appeal to 
interested group leaders of Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts, day 
camps, community volunteers, and to teachers in need of 
refresher training in methods, materials, and contemporary 
processes. 



ADVANCE NOTICE 
NORTH CAROLINA SYMPHONY CONCERT 

Members of the Duke University Community are 
reminded of the opportunity to hear the North Carolina 
Symphony Orchestra in concert on Wednesday, January 
29th, at 8:15 p.m. in Page Auditorium. The orchestra is 
conducted by the musical director, Dr. Benjamin Swalin. 
The soloist for the concert will be Malcolm Smith, leading 
bass with the New York City Opera 

Membership subscriptions (tax deductable) are priced at 
$5.00 for one individual, $8.00 for two individuals, and 
$1.00 for all students. Subscription tickets are now 
available in Page Box Office Monday - Friday from 9:00 a. 
m. to 5:00 p. m. Membership in the North Carolina 
Symphony Society entitles subscribers to attend all 
concerts sponsored by chapters of the Symphony Society 
in North Carolina. It also supports the work of the 
Symphony and provides free childrens' concerts across the 
state. Membership subscriptions will be available at the Box 
Office on the evening of the concert as will individual 
tickets for the concert. These tickets are priced at $2.50 for 
each individual and $1.00 for all students. 

The concert at Duke University is co-sponsored by the 
Durham Chapter of the North Carolina Symphony Society, 
Incorporated and the Performing Arts Committee of the 
Duke Student Union. 

APPOINTMENTS AVAILABLE 
UNESCO TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE 

Information has been received by the University about 
temporary positions available for faculty members with a 
minimum of from five to ten years experience through the 
United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural 
Organization for technical assistance in education to many 
of the developing countries in Latin America, the Near 
East, South Asia, the Far East and Africa. Further 
information about these positions which are for periods of 
one to two years is available in Room 220 Allen Building, 
or through contacting Charles N. St. John, Jr., UNESCO 
Program Specialist, Institute of International Studies, 
Department of Health, Education and Welfare, Office of 
Education. Washington, D. C. 20202. 



DUKE ARTISTS SERIES 
REPLACEMENT ANNOUNCED 

The Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra with Leopold Sipe 
conducting will replace the Philadelphia Chamber Orchestra 
on the 1968-69 Artists Series. The date for this 
performance will be Sunday, February 23rd, at 8:15 p.m. 
in Page Auditorium. Tickets imprinted for the Philadelphia 
Chamber Orchestra should be used for this performance. 

The Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra and its conductor 
Leopold Sipe are a modern ensemble molded from the great 
tradition of assembled virtuosi playing as one, but with a 
spirit of excitement and youthful vigor to make every 
concert experience a challenge. The orchestra of 
twenty-two members includes strings, woodwinds, and a 
harpsichord. Its players have been selected from Europe 
and America for a new kind of combined musicianship. 



Leopold Sipe is a young American who has gained his 
conducting experience in Europe and America through 
combining the traditions of the baroque and classical 
periods with a search for new expression from the Western 
Hemisphere. For nine years he lived and worked in Saint 
Paul molding his repertoire and his program for creating 
this chamber orchestra to be a new direction for Twentieth 
Century America 

Season tickets priced at $13.00, $11.00, and $9.00 are 
available in Page Box Office. A check payable to Duke 
University Artists Series should accompany orders and 
should be mailed to Box KM Duke Station, Durham, North 
Carolina. Call 684-4059 for further information. All 
concerts will be held in Page Auditorium at 8:15 p.m. 

Individual tickets for all concerts, priced at $3.25, 
$2.75, and $2.25, will be available at the Page Box Office 
beginning Monday, February 10th. 



DUKE UNIVERSITY 

OFFICIAL EXAMINATION SCHEDULE 

FALL SEMESTER, 1968 

ANY STUDENT WISHING TO PETITION FOR RELIEF FROM THREE EXAMINATIONS WITHIN TWENTY-FOUR 
HOURS OR TWO EXAMINATIONS AT THE SAME TIME' MUST REPORT TO HIS DEAN'S OFFICE NOT LATER THAN 
DECEMBER 20, 1968, TO REQUEST A CHANGE IN SCHEDULE. 
Monday and Tuesday, January 13, and 14, 1969— Reading Period 

French, Spanish, German 63 

MWF-4 

Religion 1, IX 

TTS-4, Engineering 1.4-1.6 

History 1, IX 

MWF-3 

English 1 

TTS-6 

Physics 1, 41, 51 

Biology 1 

TTS-2 

MWF-2, Engineering 1.1-1.3 

Math 21, 21A 

TT-7 

MWF-5 

TTS-1 

Economics 1, 51 

MWF-7 

Air & Naval Science 

Chemistry 1,41 

Language 1 

TTS-3 

P.S. 11 

MWF-6 

MWF-1 



Wednesday 


9:00-12:00 N 


15th 


2:00- 5:00 pm 




7:00-10:00 pm 


Thursday 


9:00-12:00 N 


16th 


2:00- 5:00 pm 




7:00-10:00 pm 


Friday 


9:00-12:00 N 


17th 


2:00- 5:00 pm 




7:00-10:00 pm 


Saturday 


9:00-12:00 N 


18th 


2:00- 5:00 pm 


Monday 


9:00-12:00 N 


20th 


2:00- 5:00 pm 




7:00-10:00 


Tuesday 


9:00-12:00 N 


21st 


2:00- 5:00 pm 




7:00-10:00 pm 


Wednesday 


9:00-12:00 N 


22nd 


2:00- 5:00 pm 




7:00-10:00 pm 


Thursday 


9:00-12:00 N 


23rd 


2:00- 5:00 pm 




7:00-10:00 pm 


Friday 


9:00-12:00 N 


24th 


2:00- 5:00 pm 



Chemistry and Biology (except Chemistry 1 and Biology 1) classes meet for examination at the time scheduled for their 
general lecture period. 

ANY EXAMINATION NOT COVERED IN THE FOREGOING SCHEDULE IS TO BE ARRANGED BY THE 
INSTRUCTOR IN CHARGE OF THE COURSE IN THE PERIOD BEGINNING JANUARY 15, 9:00 a.m. AND ENDING 
JANUARY 24, 5:00 p.m. NO EXAMINATION IS TO BE GIVEN BEFORE 9:00 a.m. JANUARY 15, WITH THE 
EXCEPTION OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION. NO CHANGE IS TO BE MADE IN ANY SCHEDULED EXAMINATION 
WITHOUT THE APPROVAL OF THE COMMITTEE. 






Application to mail at second class postage rate i 
pending at Durham, North Carolina. 



CALENDAR 




Jan. 19-26, 1969 



Volume 69 



Published Jan. 17, 1969 



Number 3 



Sunday, January 19 



10:30-10:45 a.m. Carillon Recital. Mr. J. Samuel 
Hammond, University Carillonneur. 

11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship. University 
Chapel. Preacher: The Reverend Elmer 0. Hall, 
Assistant Chaplain to the University. Sermon: "Called 
to Freedom." Broadcast over Radio Station WDNC and 
WDNC-FM. 

11:25 a.m Duke University Radio Program, "Challenges in 
Education." WCHL Chapel Hill. Miss Kathleen Merry 
will discuss "The Research Arm of a Legal Aid Clinic. 

4:00—6:00 p.m. International Open House. 2022 Campus 
Drive. 

7:00 and 9:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page Auditorium. 
"WHAT'S UP TIGER LILY." Woody Allen's 
substituting English gags for dialogue of Japanese-made 
spy film. "Very funny -- refreshingly original."--Judith 
Crist, World Journal Tribune. "Allen's sense o fun is at 
once low-keyed, far-out, and hip! "--Knight, Saturday 
Review. 

7:30 p.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Challenges in 
Education." WPTF Raleigh. Dr. Kenneth Clark will 
discuss "The Mountain of the Monks." 



Monday, January 20 



9:00 a.m The final examination of Mr. Richard Scott 

Craddock for the Ed.D. degree in Education. Room 

08A West Duke Building. 
4:15—5:30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 

faculty, staff members, and students. 
5:15 p.m. Faculty Volleyball. Card Gymnasium 
7:00 p.m. International Folk Dancing. The Ark, East 

Campus. 



Tuesday, January 21 



4:15—5:30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 

faculty, staff members, and students. 
7:30—10:00 p.m. Scottish Country Dancing. Presbyterian 

Student Center. 



Wednesday, January 22 

4:15—5:30 p.m.' East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. 



7:00—8:30 p.m. Chapel Choir Rehearsal. University 
Chapel. 

7:00—9:00 p.m. Open House Badminton for all men and 
women: faculty and students. East Campus 
Gymnasium. 



Thursday, January 23 

4:00 p.m. Academic Council Meeting. Room 208 Flowers 

Building. 
4:15—5:30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 

faculty, staff members, and students. 
5:00 p.m. Dean's Hour. Hospital Amphitheater. Speaker: 

Dr. Benjamin Felson. 
5:15 p.m. Faculty Volleyball. Card Gymnasium 
8:00 p.m. Duke-UNC Drama Presentation: Tournee 

Theatre in "Der Zerbrochene Krug." Playmakers 

Theatre, Cameron Avenue, UNC at Chapel Hill, N. C. 



Friday, January 24 



: 15— 5:30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. Faculty 
daughters, ages 6 to 16, may also swim; those 10 and 
under must be accompanied by their mothers. 

:00— 9:00 p.m. Open House Badminton for all men and 
women: faculty and students. East Campus 
Gymnasium. 



Saturday, January 25 

10:55 a.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Challenges in 
Education." WDNC Durham. Miss Kathleen Merry will 
discuss "The Research Arm of a Legal Aid Clinic." 

2:00 p.m. Basketball: Duke vs. N.C. State. Indoor 
Stadium Televised on Station WTVD. 

3:00—5:00 p.m. East Campus Gymnasium: Open to 
students, faculty, and staff for recreation (swimming, 
badminton, volleyball, basketball, table 
tennis). 



Sunday, January 26 

10:30-10:45 a.m. Carillon Recital. Mr. J. Samuel 
Hammond, University Carillonneur. 



11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship. University 

Chapel. Preacher: The Reverend Professor James T. 

Cleland, Dean of the Chapel. Broadcast over Radio 

Station WDNC and WDNC-FM. 
11:25 a.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Challenges in 

Education." WCHL Chapel Hill. Dean Daniel Sampson 

and Professor Ernest Gellhorn will discuss "An 

Introduction to Legal Education." 
4:00—6:00 p.m. International Open House. 2022 Campus 

Drive. 
7:30 p.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Challenges in 

Education." WPTF Raleigh. Captain Eugene Mitchell 

and Dr. Herbert Saltzman will discuss "A Saturation 

Dive." 



NOTICES for the Duke University Calendar 
should be submitted IN WRITTEN FORM to Room 
207 Flowers Building, not later than 5 p.m. Tuesday, 
Ext 2911. 



Published by Duke University Student Activities 
Department. Box KM, Duke Station. Durham, N.C. 
27706 each week when school is in session; 
Subscriptions: $2.50 per year. Address inquiries to 
Box KM, Duke Station." Durham, N.C. 27706. 
Application to mail at second class postage rates is 
pending at Durham, N.C. 



UNIVERSITY SERVICE OF WORSHIP 

The Reverend Elmer O. Hall. Assistant Chaplain to the 
University, will deliver the sermon at the University Service 
of Worship on Sunday, January 19th, at 11:00 a.m in the 
University Chapel. The sermon topic is "Called to 
Freedom." 



RELIGIOUS ORGANIZATIONS 
ANNOUNCEMENTS 

EPISCOPAL CENTER (UCM). 5:15 p.m. Thursday, 
January 23rd. Holy Communion. 

8:00 a.m. Sunday, January 19th and 26th. Holy 
Communion. 

9:15 a.m. Sunday, January 19th and 26th. Choral Eucharist 
and sermon. 

CATHOLIC. 9:30 a.m. Sunday, January 19th and 26th. 
Mass, Room 130 Speaker: Dr. James T. Taylor. Executive 
Secretary of the North Carolina Good Neighbor 
Psychology-Sociology Building. 

12:40 p.m. Daily Mass. Monday, Wednesday, and Friday. 
Room 208 Flowers Building. Tuesday and Thursday. New 
Hospital Chapel. 

UNITARIAN-UNIVERSALIST FELLOWSHIP. 10:30 
am. Sunday, January 19th. "Negro History Through 
Song." A special program by Margaret Moore and Howard 
Lee. Carolina Friends School. 

10:30 a.m. Sunday, January 26th. "Experiencing." A group 
happening led by Professor Wil Edgerton, UNC Medical 
School. Carolina Friends School. (Follow signs on Erwin 



Road and Mt. Sinai Road. For transportation or further 
information call one of the following numbers between 
9:30 and 10:00 a.m: 286-9702, 489-3992, 489-4600). 

BAHAT FELLOWSHIP. 5:30 p.m. Sunday, January 
19th. "Building a New World." Speaker: Dr. James T. 
Taylor, Executive Secretary of the North Carolina Good 
Neighbor Council. Friends Meeting House, 404 Alexander 
Avenue. 

6:00 p.m. Sunday, January 26. Prayer and Meditation 
followed by a discussion on "The Promise of All Ages." 
1903 Essex Road. 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE ED.D. DEGREE 1 

The final examination of Mr. Richard Scott Craddock 
for the Ed.D. degree in Education will be held on Monday, 
January 20th, at 9:00 a.m in Room 08A West Duke 
Building. The subject of Mr. Craddock's dissertation is "The 
Views of Professional American Historians on the Values 
and Purposes of Historical Study." The committee to 
conduct the examination consists of Professors William H. 
Cartwright, Allan S. Hurlburt, Olan L. Petty, R. Baird 
Shuman and Richard L. Watson, Jr. Professor Cartwright 
will preside. 



ACADEMIC COUNCIL MEETING 

The Academic Council will meet at 4:00 p.m. on 
Thursday, January 23rd, in Room 208 Flowers Building. 

DEAN'S HOUR 

The Dean's Hour will be held on Thursday, January 
23rd, from 5:00 to 6:00 p.m. in the Hospital 
Amphitheater. Dr. Benjamin Felson, Professor of 
Radiology, Cincinnati General Hospital, University of 
Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio, will speak on "Some New 
Ways to Learn — Look Dean, No Hands." 



DUKE-UNC DRAMA PRESENTATION 

TOURNEE THEATRE IN 

"DER ZERBROCHENE KRUG" 

The German Departments and Delta Phi Alpha chapters 
of Duke and UNC are co-sponsoring a performance of 
Heinrich von Kleist's famous comedy "Der Zerbrochene 
Krug" ("The Broken Jug") in German by the fifteen 
member West German Toumee Theatre from Remscheid 
near Cologne. The play will be presented on Thursday, 
January 23rd, at 8:00 p.m. at the Playmakers Theatre on 
Cameron Avenue at UNC in Chapel Hill, N. C. There will be 
a reception after the performance in the Dey Hall Faculty 
Lounge of the UNC German Department during which the 
audience will have the opportunity to meet the West 
German group. 

"Der Zerbrochene Krug" has often been called the 
master comedy of German literature. Wilhelm Michael 
Mund and Blanca Blacha, the leading players of the West 



German Tournee Theatre, have played in their respective 
roles in "Der Zerbrochene Krug" more than 170 times in 
tours in Germany, Belgium, Italy, the Netherlands, Great 
Britain, and Ireland. Both Mund and Blacha are specialists 
of Kleist interpretation, having studied the complete work 
of the German dramatist. 

Tickets for the performance at $1.50 per person may be 
obtained in advance at Duke at the Page Auditorium Box 
Office Monday— Friday from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. or the 
Duke German Department Office, Room 104 Languages 
Building. 



STUDENT UNION EXHIBITION 

CREATIVE ART 

BY STUDENTS OF ZEREN EARLS 

Eye-catching collages, original mobiles, and water-color 
paintings along with a varied sampling of sculptures and 
other constructions make up an exhibition of nearly 200 
creative art works by students of Zeren Earls, wife of Duke 
composer Paul Earls. 

Sponsored by the Graphic Arts Committee of the 
Student Union, the exhibition in the Womans' College 
Library Gallery is open to all during regular library hours 
through January. 

Mrs. Earls teaches classes for beginning art students from 
4 to 15 years of age as well as for parents at the Methodist 
Student Center on Oregon Street. She also has a special 
class for adults in the Fundamentals of Art. 

Designed to help beginners explore their own interests 
and aptitudes and to introduce them to fundamentals of 
creative artistic expression, the adult class helps develop 
competence in elementary artistic processes and techniques, 
with experiments in painting, modeling, collage, 
three-dimensional construction, and graphic processes. 

Mrs. Earls begins a new teaching session on February 
10th, with the added feature of a workshop course in the 
development of creative programs for children from 4-14 
years of age. The course, to be given Saturday mornings for 
two hours through the semester, is designed especially to 
appeal to interested group leaders of Boy Scouts, Girl 
Scouts, day camps, community volunteers, and to teachers 
in need of refresher training in methods, material' - , and 
contemporary processes. 



Between Semester Schedule 

January 24 - January 30, 1969 

Perkins Library and Woman's College Library 

Fri.,Jan. 24 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. 

Sat., Jan. 25 8:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m. 

Sun., Jan. 26 Closed 

Mon., Jan. 27 - Thurs., Jan. 30 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. 

Fri., Jan. 31 Resume regular schedule 



ADVANCE NOTICE 
NORTH CAROLINA SYMPHONY CONCERT 

Members of the Ouke University Community are 
reminded of the opportunity to hear the North Carolina 
Symphony Orchestra in concert on Wednesday, January 



29th, at 8:15 p.m. in Page Auditorium. The orchestra is 
conducted by the musical director, Dr. Benjamin Swalin. 
The soloist for the concert will be Malcolm Smith, leading 
bass with the New York City Opera. 

Membership subscriptions (tax deductable) are priced at 
$5.00 for one individual, $8.00 for two individuals, and 
$1.00 for all students. Subscription tickets are now 
available in Page Box Office Monday - Friday from 9:00 a. 
m. to 5:00 p. m. Membership in the North Carolina 
Symphony Society entitles subscribers to attend all 
concerts sponsored by chapters of the Symphony Society 
in North Carolina. It also supports the work of the 
Symphony and provides free childrens' concerts across the 
state. Membership subscriptions will be available at the Box 
Office on the evening of the concert as will individual 
tickets for the concert. These tickets are priced at $2.50 for 
each individual and $1.00 for all students. 

The concert at Duke University is co-sponsored by the 
Durham Chapter of the North Carolina Symphony Society, 
Incorporated and the Performing Arts Committee of the 
Duke Student Union. 



DUKE ARTISTS SERIES 
REPLACEMENT ANNOUNCED 

The Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra with Leopold Sipe 
conducting will replace the Philadelphia Chamber Orchestra 
on the 1968-69 Artists Series. The date for this 
performance will be Sunday, February 23rd, at 8:15 p.m. 
in Page Auditorium. Tickets imprinted for the Philadelphia 
Chamber Orchestra should be used for this performance. 

The Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra and its conductor 
Leopold Sipe are a modern ensemble molded from the great 
tradition of assembled virtuosi playing as one, but with a 
spirit of excitement and youthful vigor to make every 
concert experience a challenge. The orchestra of 
twenty-two members includes strings, woodwinds, and a 
harpsichord. Its players have been selected from Europe 
and America for a new kind of combined musicianship. 

Leopold Sipe is a young American who has gained his 
conducting experience in Europe and America through 
combining the traditions of the baroque and classical 
periods with a search for new expression from the Western 
Hemisphere. For nine years he lived and worked in Saint 
Paul molding his repertoire and his program for creating 
this chamber orchestra to be a new direction for Twentieth 
Century America. Other programs in the Series are: 

Wednesday, February 26, 1969 

GOLDOVSKY GRAND OPERA THEATER presenting 
"Carmen." Bizet's "Carmen" in English performed by a 
company of seventy is another demonstration of opera as 
living theater by the new expanded Goldovsky Opera 
Theater under the artistic direction of Boris Goldovsky. 

Wednesday, March 5, 1969 

CLIFFORD CURZON, PIANIST. Clifford Curzon, 
recognized as one of Britain's finest pianists and one of the 
greatest pianists of the time, returns to the United States in 
January, 1969 after a two year absence. Acclaimed on his 
last visit here for "greatness of a kind that is forgotten 
today" (New York Times), Clifford Curzon has been one of 
the most welcome of international concert commuters ever 
since his first concert here in 1939. 



Wednesday, March 19, 1969 

THE HARKNESS BALLET. "The Harkness Ballet" has 
earned top flight artistic recognition in its meteoric rise to 
fame through a combination of leading choreographers, 
composers, and designers as well as a company dedicated to 
excellence. The company is headed by Brian Macdonald, 
director, Donald Saddler, associate director; and Jonathan 
Sternberg, musical director. 

Friday, April 11, 1969 

SHIRLEY VERRETT, MEZZO-SOPRANO. S. Hurok 
presents the brilliant mezzo-soprano Shirley Verrett whose 
superb voice, artistry, and bearing puts her, not only in the 
forefront of American singers, but among the finest singers 
of our time. Her star shines brightly on the world's concert 
stages, at London's Royal Opera, Covent Garden, at Milan's 
La Scala, at the Bolshoi in Moscow, and our own 
Metropolitan Opera Company. 

Season tickets priced at $13.00, $11.00, and $9.00 are 
available in Page Box Office. A check payable to Duke 
University Artists Series should accompany orders and 
should be mailed to Box KM Duke Station, Durham, North 
Carolina. Call 684-4059 for further information. All 
concerts will be held in Page Auditorium at 8:15 p.m. 

Individual tickets for all concerts, priced at $3.25, 
$2.75, and $2.25, will be available at the Page Box Office 
beginning Monday, February 10th. 



STUDENT UNION CINEMATIC ARTS 

16mm FILM SERIES-SPRING 1969 

Showings on Fridays, 8:00 p.m. 

Biological Sciences Auditorium 

February 7 

Monkey Business (Marx Brothers) 
El (Luis Bunuel) 

February 14 

Rules of the Game (Jean Renoir) 
unscheduled short 

February 28 

Life Upside Down (Alain Jessua) 
Senseless (Ron Rice) 

March 7 

Rome: Open City (Roberto Rosselini) 
La Strada (Federico Fellini) 

March 14 

Blood of a Poet (Jean Cocteau) 

Easy Street (Charles Chaplin) 

Columbia Newsreel 

April 4 

The Silence (Ingmar Bergman) 

Confessions of a Black Mother Succuba 

(Robert Nelson) 

April 18 

I Live in Fear (Kenji Mizoguchi) 
Rhinoceros (Jan Lenica) 



May 9 

M (Fritz Lang) 

You Can't Cheat an Honest Man 

(W.C. Fields) 

May 16 

Masculine Feminine (Jean-Luc Godard) 
unscheduled short 

Series tickets are available at Page Box Office 
Monday— Friday, 9:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m., or by mail from 
Box KM, Duke Station. Checks should be made payable to 
Duke University Student Union. Tickets are $5.50 for the 9 
programs, or $.75 at the door. 



SPECIAL UNIVERSITY ANNOUNCEMENTS 

Provost R. Taylor Cole, who has resigned his 
administrative position, will move to his new office in the 
Perkins Library on January 15, 1969. 



Professor Marcus E. Hobbs will move to 212 Allen 
Building on January 15th to assume his new position as 
Provost His telephone number will be Extension 2631, 
which is presently Dr. Cole's number. 

* * * 

Dr. Barnes Woodhall has relinquished his position as 
Associate Provost for Medical Affairs to become Special 
Assistant to President Knight 

* * * 

Dr. William G. Anlyan has been appointed Associate 
Provost for Medical Affairs to replace Dr. Woodhall. This 
change is effective January 15, 1969. 



Application to mail at second class postage rate is 
pending at Durham, North Carolina. 



Duke University 

CALENDAR/ 




Jan. 26-Feb. 2, 1969 



Volume 69 



Published Jan. 24, 1969 



Number 4 



Sunday, January 26 



10:30—10:45 a.m. Carillon Recital. Mr. J. Samuel 

Hammond, University Carillonneur. 
11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship. University 

Chapel. Preacher: The Reverend Professor James T. 

Cleland, Dean of the Chapel. Sermon: "Classroom and 

ChapeL" Broadcast over Radio Station WDNC and 

WDNC-FM. 
11:25 am. Duke University Radio Program, "Challenges in 

Education." WCHL Chapel Hill. Dean Daniel Sampson 

and Professor Ernest Gellhorn will discuss "An 

Introduction to Legal Education." 
4:00—6:00 p.m. International Open House. 2022 Campus 

Drive. 
7:30 p.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Challenges in 

Education." WPTF Raleigh. Captain Eugene MitcheU 

and Dr. Herbert Saltzman will discuss "A Saturation 

Dive." 
8:00 p.m. Allied Arts Chamber Music Concert. Allied Arts 

Center, 810 West Proctor Street. 

Monday, January 27 

Fraternity Rush. (January 27-31). 

10:00 a.m. The final examination of Mr. Thomas Charles 

Hood for the Ph.D. degree in Sociology. Room 258 

Psychology— Sociology Building. 
5:15 p.m. Faculty Volleyball. Card Gymnasium. 
7:00 p.m. International Folk Dancing. The Ark, East 

Campus. 
8:15—9:30 p.m. West Campus Swimming Pool open to 

faculty members and their families. Faculty children 

will be admitted only when accompanied by their 

parents. 

Tuesday, January 28 

Registration and Matriculation of New Students. 
7:30—10:00 p.m. Scottish Country Dancing. Presbyterian 

Student Center. 
8:00 p.m. Basketball: Duke vs. Temple University. 

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Wednesday, January 29 

9:00 a.m. The final examination of Mr. Myong-Joon Roe 
for the Ph.D. degree in Political Science. Room 302 
Perkins Library. 



7:00—8:30 p.m. Chapel Choir Rehearsal. University 

Chapel. 
7:00—9:00 p.m. Open House Badminton for all men and 

women: faculty and students. East Campus 

Gymnasium. 
8:15 p.m. N.C. Symphony Orchestra Concert. Benjamin 

Swalin, conductor. Malcolm Smith, soloist. Page 

Auditorium. 

Thursday, January 30 

Last day for matriculation for the Spring Semester. 
4:15—5:30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 

faculty, staff members, and students. 
5:00—6:00 p.m. Dean's Hour. Hospital Amphitheater. 

Speaker: Dr. Owen H. Wangensteen. 
5:15 p.m. Faculty Volleyball. Card Gymnasium. 
8:15—9:30 p.m. West Campus Swimming Pool open to 

faculty members and their families. Faculty children 

will be admitted only when accompanied by their 

parents. 

Friday, January 31 

Sorority Open Houses. Carr Building. 

8:10 a.m. Spring Semester Classes Begin. 

3:30 p.m. Chemistry Staff Seminar. Room 130 

Psychology— Sociology Building. Speaker: Dr. Anton 

F. Schreiner. 
4:15—5:30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 

faculty, staff members, and students. Faculty 

daughters, ages 6 to 16, may also swim; those under 10 

must be accompanied by their mothers. 
7:00—9:00 p.m. Open House Badminton for all men and 

women: faculty and students. East Campus 

Gymnasium. 
8:15 p.m. Music Faculty Series: Ciompi-Withers Duo. 

Music Room, East Duke Building. 

Saturday, February 1 



10:55 a-m. Duke University Radio Program, "Challenges in 
Education." WDNC Durham. Dean Daniel Sampson 
and Professor Ernest Gellhom will discuss "An 
Introduction to Legal Education." 

3:00—5:00 p.m. East Campus Gymnasium: Open to 
students, faculty, and staff for recreation (swimming, 
badminton, volleyball, basketball, table tennis). 



7:05 and 9:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page Auditorium. 
"DR. FAUSTUS" with Richard Burton and Elizabeth 
Taylor and the Oxford University Dramatic Society. 
"Richard Burton has stamped Faustus with a swirl of 
Color, Mood and Intensity!" William Wolf -- Cue. 
"Richard Burton's performance burns with a demonic 
fire and soars with the magic of his voice!" Arthur 
Knight -- Saturday Review. Technicolor. First time in 
Durham. 

8:00 p.m. Basketball: Duke vs. University of South 
Carolina. Columbia, South Carolina. 

Sunday, February 2 

10:30-10:45 a.m. Carillon Recital. Mr. J. Samuel 
Hammond, University Carillonneur. 

11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship. Holy 
Communion. University Chapel. Celebrant, The 
Reverend Professor James T. Cleland. Preacher, The 
Reverend Dr. Howard C. Wilkinson. Broadcast over 
Radio Station WDNC and WDNC-FM. 

11:25 a.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Challenges in 
Education." WCHL Chapel Hill. Dr. Chester Zmijewski 
will discuss "Quality Control Labs for Organ 
Transplants." 

4:00—6:00 p.m. International Open House. 2022 Campus 
Drive. 

7:05 and 9:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page Auditorium. 
"DR. FAUSTUS." 

7:30 p.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Challenges in 
Education." WPTF Raleigh. Miss Kathleen Merry will 
discuss "The Research Arm of a Legal Aid Clinic." 



NOTICES for the Duke University Calendar 
should be submitted IN WRITTEN FORM to Room 
207 Flowers Building, not later than 5 p.m.. Tuesday, 
Ext 2911. 



Published by Duke University Student Activities 
Department. Box KM, Duke Station, Durham, N.C. 
27706 each week when school is in session. 
Subscriptions: $2.50 per year. Address inquiries to 
Box KM, Duke Station,' Durham. N.C. 27706. 
Application to mail at second class postage rates is 
pending at Durham, N.C. 



UNIVERSITY SERVICE OF WORSHIP 

The Reverend Professor James T. Cleland, Dean of the 
Chapel, will deliver the sermon at the University Service of 
Worship on Sunday, January 26th, at 11:00 a.m. in the 
University Chapel. The sermon topic is "Classroom and 
Chapel." 

ALLIED ARTS PRESENTS 
CHAMBER MUSIC CONCERTS 

Allied Arts of Durham, Inc. is pleased to announce a 
series of Chamber Music Programs to be performed by a 



group of talented musicians from the North Carolina 
Symphony Orchestra. The Allied Arts Chamber Players are 
composed of Faith N. Bowie, viola; Katsuko Esaki, first 
violin; John N. Goodwin, cello; M.J. Lang, clarinet; and 
Patricia Wolery, second violin. The five concerts will all be 
presented at the Allied Arts Center on Sunday evenings at 
8:00 p.m. during the months of January, February, and 
March. Dates for the remaining concerts are: February 2, 
February 23, and March 9. The program for Sunday, 
January 26th follows: 

Quartet in D major, Op. 64, No. 5 Haydn 

Quintet for Clarinet and Strings, Op. 34 von Weber 

Five-punch season tickets are available, priced at $10.00, 
General Admission; $7.50, Allied Arts Members; $5.00, 
Students. These tickets may be used for five single 
admissions to one concert, one admission to each of the 
five concerts, or any combination of five admissions, at the 
discretion of the ticket holder. Individual tickets for any 
one concert are also available, priced at $2.50, General 
Admission; $2.00, Allied Arts Members; $1.50, Students. 
All tickets may be obtained through the Allied Arts Center 
before or on the evening of the concert. Reservations will 
be taken by phone (682-5519 or 682-1381) Monday 
through Friday, 9:00 am. to 5:00 p.m. 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. Thomas Charles Hood for 
the Ph.D. degree in Sociology will be held on Monday 
January 27th, at 10:00 a.m. in Room 258 
Psychology-Sociology Building. The subject of Mr. Hood's 
dissertation is "Leadership Nominations: A Study of the 
Determinants of Consensus." The committee to conduct 
the examination consists of Professors Joel Smith, Kurt W. 
Back, Jack Preiss, and Allan Romberg. Professor Joel Smith 
will preside. 






FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 






The final examination of Mr. Myong-Joon Roe for the 
Ph.D. degree in Political Science will be held on Wednesday, 
January 29th, at 9:00 a.m. in Room 302 Perkins Library. 
The subject of Mr. Roe's dissertation is "Public 
International Law and Fisheries Interests of Selected 
Commonwealth States, 1936-1960." The committee to 
conduct the examination consists of Professors Robert R. 
Wilson, John H. Hallowell, Kazimierz Grzybowski and Hans 
W. Baade. Professor Wilson will preside. 



N.C. SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA CONCERT 

The N.C. Symphony Orchestra will be presented in a 
major concert on Wednesday, January 29th at 8:15 p.m. in 
Page Auditorium. The concert is co-sponsored by the 
Durham Chapter of the N.C. Symphony Society, Inc. and 
the Performing Arts Committee of the Duke University 
Student Union. 

The Orchestra will be conducted by Dr. Benjamin Swalin 
who has since the mid-thirties led the orchestra through its 
remarkable development and cultural services to the entire 
state. Each year the Symphony performs more than 150 



concerts, visiting over 50 cities in their travels of about 
14,000 miles. The admission-free childrens' concerts are 
made possible by the season ticket subscribers and provide 
concerts for over 190,000 children in North Carolina each 
season. The children and teachers are prepared for the 
concerts through workshops and printed guidebooks. 

Featured as guest soloist will be Malcolm Smith, leading 
bass with the New York City Opera. Mr. Smith had his 
musical career launched in 1962 when he was selected as 
the bass soloist for the Robert Shaw Chorale "B Minor 
Mass" tour throughout Russia. A native of New York, 
Smith made an exceptionally well received debut with the 
New York City Opera in 1965, and has subsequently been 
heard with that company in all the leading bass parts. In the 
past season, Mr. Smith made a highly praised European 
operatic debut as King Mark in the Spoleto Festival 
Production of "Tristan and Isolde." In concert here, Mr. 
Smith will be heard in arias from Handel's oratorio 
"Samson," from Massenet's "Manon," the "Barber of 
Seville" by Rossini, and "Simone Boccanegra" by Verdi. 

Admission is by membership in the N.C. Symphony 
Society or by individual concert tickets, both of which are 
available at Page Box Office. Tax deductible memberships 
for students are $1.00 with adult seasonal memberships 
priced at $5.00 for one person, $8.00 for two. Seasonal 
memberships are valid for any concert by the full 
symphony or its Little Symphony groups anywhere in the 
state. Individual concert tickets, available at the door, are 
$2.50 for adults and $1.00 for all students. Proceeds from 
memberships help defray the costs of the free childrens' 
concerts throughout the state. 

In addition to the arias by Malcolm Smith, the program 
will include the "Overture to The Magic Flute" by Mozart; 
the Brahms "Symphony No. 1 in C minor;" and 
Rimsky-Korsakov's "Overture to the Great Russian Easter." 

DEAN'S HOUR 

The Dean's Hour will be held on Thursday, January 
30th, from 5:00 to 6:00 p.m. in the Hospital 
Amphitheater. Dr. Owen H. Wangensteen, Department of 
Surgery, University of Minnesota Medical School, 
Minneapolis, Minnesota, will present the "Gardner 
Lecture." The topic of his presentation will be "Historical 
Aspects of the Evolution of the Management of Acute 
Intestinal Obstruction." 

CHEMISTRY STAFF SEMINAR 

Dr. Anton F. Schreiner, Department of Chemistry, 
North Carolina State University at Raleigh, will speak at the 
Chemistry Staff Seminar on Friday, January 31st, at 3:30 
p.m. in Room 130 Psychology -Sociology Building. The 
subject of Dr. Schreiner's address will be "Interpretations 
of Properties of Several Molecules Containing Metal-Carbon 
Bonds." All interested persons are cordially invited to 
attend. 

MUSIC FACULTY SERIES 

CIOMPI-WITHERS DUO 

RECITAL OF BEETHOVEN SONATAS 

The Ciompi-Withers Duo will present a series of recitals 

during 1969 and 1970 in which the ten Sonatas for 
Pianoforte and Violin by Beethoven will be performed. 
Presentation of these works is in commemoration of the 
200th anniversary of the birth of Beethoven. 



The first recital of the series will be given on Friday, 
January 31st, at 8:15 p.m. in the Music Room, East Duke 
Building. It is open to the public without charge. The 
program will include the following: 

Sonata No. 1 in D Major, Op. 12, No. 1 
Sonata No. 5 in F Major, Op. 24 ("Spring") 
Sonata No. 9 in A Major, Op. 47 ("Kreutzer") 
Giorgio Ciompi, violinist, and Loren Withers, pianist, are 
members of the faculty of Duke University's Department of 
Music. 



Perkins Library and Woman's College Library 

Fri., Jan. 24 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. 

Sat., Jan. 25 8:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m. 

Sun., Jan. 26 Closed 

Mon., Jan. 27 - Thurs., Jan. 30 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. 

Fri., Jan. 31 Resume regular schedule 

EAST CAMPUS POOL SCHEDULE 

The East Campus Pool will be closed Monday through 
Wednesday, January 27th, 28th and 29th, and will reopen 
on Thursday, January 30th. 

VIOLIN SCHOOL OPENING 

Openings are available for string players in the Junior 
String Orchestra of the Di Cecco— Kitchen Violin SchooL 
Rehearsals are held every Saturday at 2:00 p.m. on the East 
Campus. Violin students are also being accepted for the 
second semester which begins on Saturday, February 1st. 
Contact Mrs. Di Cecco at 489-4675 for further information. 

BROADWAY AT DUKE 

VIVECA LINDFORS "YOU, ME, AND THE WORLD" 

"MAN OF LA MANCHA" 

Tickets are available, priced at $2.50 and $2.00, at Page 
Box Office for the performance in Page Auditorium on 
Wednesday, February 5th, at 8:15 p.m. of the Strolling 
Players presenting Viveca Lindfors and Company in three 
contemporary one-act plays. 

The evening performance, on Friday, February 21st, of 
"Man of La Mancha" is sold out but good tickets remain 
available at Page Box Office, priced at $5.25, $4.50, and 
$4.00 for the 4:00 p.m. matinee on the same day. 

The Box Office is open Monday through Friday from 
9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Reservations may be made by 
calling the Box Office, 684-4059, or by writing Broadway 
at Duke, Box KM Duke Station, Durham, North Carolina. 

DUKE ARTISTS SERIES 

The Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra with Leopold Sipe 
conducting will replace the Philadelphia Chamber Orchestra 
on the 1968-69 Artiste Series. The date for this 
performance will be Sunday, February 23rd, at 8:15 p.m. 
in Page Auditorium. Tickets imprinted for the Philadelphia 
Chamber Orchestra should be used for this performance. 

The Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra and its conductor 
Leopold Sipe are a modern ensemble molded from the great 
tradition of assembled virtuosi playing as one, but with a 
spirit of excitement and youthful vigor to make every 
concert experience a challenge. The orchestra of 
twenty-two members includes strings, woodwinds, and a 
harpsichord. Its players have been selected from Europe 



and America for a new kind of combined musicianship. 

Leopold Sipe is a young American who has gained his 
conducting experience in Europe and America through 
combining the traditions of the baroque and classical 
periods with a search for new expression from the Western 
Hemisphere. For nine years he lived and worked in Saint 
Paul molding his repertoire and his program for creating 
this chamber orchestra to be a new direction for Twentieth 
Century America. Other programs in the Series are: 

Wednesday, February 26, 1969 

COLDOVSKY GRAND OPERA THEATER presenting 
"Carmen." Bizet's "Carmen" in English performed by a 
company of seventy is another demonstration of opera as 
living theater by the new expanded Goldovsky Opera 
Theater under the artistic direction of Boris Goldovsky. 

Wednesday, March 5, 1969 

CLIFFORD CURZON, PIANIST. Clifford Curzon, 
recognized as one of Britain's finest pianists and one of the 
greatest pianists of the time, returns to the United States in 
January, 1969 after a two year absence. Acclaimed on his 
last visit here for "greatness of a kind that is forgotttn 
today" (New York Times), Clifford Curzon has been one of 
the most welcome of international concert commuters ever 
since his first concert here in 1939. 

Wednesday, March 19, 1969 

THE HARKNESS BALLET. "The Harkness Ballet" has 
earned top flight artistic recognition in its meteoric rise to 
fame through a combination of leading choreographers, 
composers, and designers as well as a company dedicated to 
excellence. The company is headed by Brian Macdonald, 
director; Donald Saddler, associate director; and Jonathan 
Sternberg, musical director. 

Friday, April 11, 1969 

SHIRLEY VERRETT, MEZZO-SOPRANO. S. Hurok 
presents the brilliant mezzo-soprano Shirley Verrett whose 
superb voice, artistry, and bearing puts her, not only in the 
forefront of American singers, but among the finest singers 
of our time. Her star shines brightly on the world's concert 
stages, at London's Royal Opera, Covent Garden, at Milan's 
La Scala, at the Bolshoi in Moscow, and our own 
Metropolitan Opera Company. 

Season tickets priced at $13.00, $11.00, and $9.00 are 
available in Page Box Office. A check payable to Duke 
University Artists Series should accompany orders and 
should be mailed to Box KM Duke Station, Durham, North 
Carolina. Call 684-4059 for further information. All 
concerts will be held in Page Auditorium at 8:15 p.m. 

Individual tickets for all concerts, priced at $3.25, 
$2.75, and $2.25, will be available at the Page Box Office 
beginning Monday, February 10th. 

STUDENT UNION CINEMATIC ARTS 

16 mm. FILM SERIES-SPRING 1969 

Showings on Fridays, 8:00 p.m. 

Biological Sciences Auditorium 

February 7 
"Monkey Business" & "El" 

February 14 
"Rules of the Game" 

February 28 
"Life Upside Down" & "Senseless" 

March 7 
"Rome: Open City" & "La Strada" 



March 14 
"Blood of a Poet" & "Easy Street" 

April 4 

"The Silence" & "Confessions of a 

Black Mother Succuba" 

April 18 
"I Live in Fear" & "Rhinoceros" 

May 9 
"M" & "You Can't Cheat an Honest Man" 

May 16 
"Masculine Feminine" 

Series tickets are available at Page Box Office 
Monday-Friday, 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., or by mail from 
Box KM, Duke Station. Checks should be made payable to 
Duke University Student Union. Tickets are $5.50 for the 9 
programs, or $.75 at the door. 

Special university announcements 

"From time to time special announcements of possible 
interest to faculty and staff will be published in the Duke 
University Calendar. These will appear under the above 
heading. These announcements, of course, will not replace 
the FACULTY NEWS LETTER." 

Miss Margaret Ball, who has resigned as Dean of the 
Woman's College, will move to her office at 2114 Campus 
Drive on January 27th. Her new telephone number will be 
Extension 2446. 

Miss Jane Philpott, presently Dean of Undergraduate 
Instruction, will become Acting Dean of the Woman'o 
College on January 27th. Her office will be located at 115 
East Duke Building, telephone Extension 2616. 

* * * 
The Faculty Health Clinic, which is designed to provide 
medical care for faculty members and adult members of 
their families, is now open from 8:30 to 10:30 a.m. 
Monday through Friday. No appointment is necessary. The 
clinic is located in the PDC Annex in the rear of the 
Statler-Hilton Hotel. Parking space is available just outside 
the entrance. For further information, call Duke Extension 
6448 or visit the clinic in person. 

Application to mail at second class 
postage is pending at Durham, N.C. 



Ouke University 

CALENDAR. 







Feb. 2-9, 1969 



Volume 69 



Published Jan. 31, 1969 



Number 5 



Sunday, February 2 



10:30-10:45 a.m. Carillon Recital. Mr. J. Samuel 
Hammond, University Carillonneur. 

11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship. Holy 
Communion. University Chapel. Celebrant: The 
Reverend Professor James T. Cleland, Dean of the 
CHapel. Preacher: The Reverend Dr. Howard C. 
Wilkinson, Chaplain to the University. Communion 
Meditation: "Are Our Sins Forgiven?" Broadcast over 
Radio Station WDNC and WDNC-FM. 

11:25 a.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Challenges in 
Education." WCHL Chapel Hill. Dr. Chester Zmijewski 
will discuss "Quality Control Labs for Organ 
Transplants." 

2:00—5:20 p.m. Sorority Open Houses. Carr Building. 

4:00-6:00 p.m. International Open House. 2022 Campus 
Drive. 

7:05 and 9:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page Auditorium. 
"DR. FAUSTUS'* with Richard Burton and Elizabeth 
Taylor and the Oxford University Dramatic Society. 
"Richard Burton has stamped Faustus with a swirl of 
Color, Mood and Intensity!" William Wolf •- Cue. 
"Richard Burton's performance burns with a demonic 
fire and soars with the magic of his voice!" Arthur 
Knight -- Saturday Review. Technicolor. First time in 
Durham. 

7:30 p.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Challenges in 
Education." WPTF Raleigh. Miss Kathleen Merry will 
discuss "The Research Arm of a Legal Aid Clinic." 



Monday, February 3 



3:00—5:00 p.m. Tryouts for Duke Players Performance of 

"Dark of the Moon." Page Auditorium. 
4:15 p.m. Zoology Seminar. Room 111 Biological Sciences 

Building. Speaker: Dr. Burke J. Hill. 
4:15—5:30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 

faculty, staff members, and students. 
5:15 p.m. Faculty Volleyball. Card Gymnasium. 
7:00 p.m. International Folk Dancing. The Ark, East 

Campus. 
7:00—9:00 p.m. Tryouts for Duke Players Performance. 

Page Auditorium. 
8:00 p.m. Freshman Basketball: Duke vs. Davidson. Indoor 

Stadium. 
8:15 p.m. Erasmus Club Meeting. Green Room, East Duke 

Building. Speaker: Professor W.D. Davies. 



8:15—9:30 p.m. West Campus Swimming Pool open to 
faculty members and their families. Faculty children 
will be admitted only when accompanied by their 
parents. 



Tuesday, February 4 



Service. University 
Lacv. Reader: Mr. 



Medical School 



10:00 a.m. Divinity School Chapel 

Chapel. Speaker: Dr. Creighton 

Chris Wilson. 
2:00 p.m. Business Division Seminar. 

Auditorium. 
3:00—5:00 p.m. Tryouts for Duke Players Performance of 

"Dark of the Moon." Page Auditorium. 
4:00 p.m. Gerontolog\ Seminar. Room 1504 Gerontology 

Building, Duke Hospital. Speaker: Dr. Frances M. Carp. 
4:15-5:30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 

facultv, staff members, and students. 
7:00—9:00 p.m. Tryouts for Duke Players Performance. 

Page Auditorium. 
7:30 p.m. Afro-American Symposium: Beauty of Black. 

"Boutique from Africa -- Past and Present" followed 

by Panel Discussion on "Extended Family Afrique." 

Participants: African students from Ivory Coast. 

Cameroon. Ghana. Nigeria. Uganda and Tanzania. CO. 

Coffee House. 
7:30-10:00 p.m. Scottish Country Dancing. Presbyterian 

Student Center. 



Wednesday, February 5 



10:00 a.m. Divinity School Chapel Service. University 
Chapel. Speaker: Dr. Daniel Schores. Reader: Mrs. 
Martha Wilson. 

2:00 p.m. Afro-American Symposium: Beauty of Black. 
Meet the Artist. Ron Anderson, Howard University. 
Gallery, Woman's College Library. 

3:00 p.m. Student Union Drama Committee Seminar: 
Viveca Lindfors. Music Room, East Duke Building. 

4:15-5:30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women- 
faculty, staff members, and students. 

7:00—8:30 p.m. Chapel Choir Rehearsal. University 
Chapel. 

7:00—9:00 p.m. Open House Badminton for all men and 
women: faculty and students. East Campus 
Gymnasium 



8:00 p.m. Basketball: Duke vs. Clemson. Clemson, South 

Carolina. 
8:15 p.m. Student Union Broadway at Duke: The Strolling 

Players with Viveca Lindfors present "You, Me and the 

World." Page Auditorium. 



Thursday, February 6 



10:00 a.m. Divinity School Chapel Service. University 

Chapel. 
12:30 p.m. Kappa Delta Pi Luncheon Meeting. East 

Campus Union. Speaker: Dr. Carl Eisdorfer. 
2:00 p.m. Afro-American Symposium: Beauty of Black. 

Seminar with Howard Fuller: "No More Orangeburgs." 
4:15—5:30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 

faculty, staff members, and students. 
5:00—6:00 p.m. Dean's Hour. Hospital Amphitheater. 

Speaker: Dr. Edward C. Franklin. 
5:15 p.m. Faculty Volleyball. Card Gymnasium. 
7:00—9:00 p.m. Department of Zoology Special Seminar. 

Room 130 Biological Sciences Building. Speaker: Dr. 

George M. Hughes. 
8:15—9:30 p.m. West Campus Swimming Pool open to 

faculty members and their families. Faculty children 

will be admitted only when accompanied by their 

parents. 



Friday, February 7 



10:00 a.m. Divinity School Chapel Service. University 

Chapel. 
12:30 p.m. Plant Ecology Seminar. Room 144 Biological 

Sciences Building. Speaker: Mr. Tad Weaver. 
2:00 p.m. Afro-American Symposium: Beauty of Black. 

Seminar on Black Drama by Karen Rux, Director, 

Ghetto Players. Room 208 Flowers Building. 
3:00 p.m. Afro-American Symposium: Beauty of Black. 

Seminar on Black Poetry by Carl Carter. Room 201 

Flowers Building. 
3:30 p.m. Chemistry Staff Seminar. Room 130 

Psychology— Sociology Building. Speaker: Dr. D. 

Stanley Tarbell. 
4:15—5:30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 

faculty, staff members, and students. Faculty 

daughters, ages 6 to 16, may also swim; those 10 and 

under must be accompanied by their mothers. 
6:30—9:15 p.m. Sorority Dormitory Coffees. Dormitory 

Parlors. 
7:00 and 9:00 p.m. Afro-American Symposium: Beauty of 

Black. Black Drama: "Baptism" by LeRoi Jones and 

"The Lord's Trombones" by J. Weldon Johnson. 

Branson Hall. Open to the public without charge. 
7:00—9:00 p.m. Open House Badminton for all men and 

women: faculty and students. East Campus 

Gymnasium. 
8:00 p.m. Student Union Cinematic Arts Committee Film 

Series: "Monkey Business" Marx Brothers. "As 

stowaways on a transatlantic liner the Marx Brothers 



are chased by the crew, become involved with winsome 
wenches, and are paired off as rival body guards to two 
feuding gangsters." "This Strange Passion" ("EI") 
directed and written by Luis Bunuel ("The Young and 
the Damned"). From the story "El" by Mercedes 
Pinto, adapted by Luis Alcoriza. Spanish dialog with 
English sub-titles. "One of Brunuel's subtlest and most 
surprising works, a deeply probing analysis of the 
inward obsessions of a paranoic, of his distorted 
outlook on reality." Season Tickets at Page Box 
Office: $5.50. Individual Tickets at Door: $.75. 



Saturday, February 8 



10:55 a.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Challenges in 
Education." WDNC Durham. Dr. Chester Zmijewski 
will discuss "Quality Control Labs for Organ 
Transplants." 

2:00 p.m. Afro-American Symposium: Beauty of Black. 
Seminar on Black Music. Music Room, East Duke 
Building. 

3:00—5:00 p.m. East Campus Gymnasium: Open to 
students, faculty, and staff for recreation (swimming, 
badminton, volleyball, basketball, table tennis). 

4:00 p.m. Afro-American Symposium: Beauty of Black. 
Film Showing: "A Black Man's Dilemma -- 'Huey'." 
Auditorium, Biological Sciences Building. 

6:00 p.m. Freshman Basketball: Duke vs. Louisburg Junior 
College. Indoor Stadium. 

7:00 p.m. Indian Movie: "Anupama." Auditorium, 
Biological Sciences Building. 

7:00 and 9:20 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page Auditorium. 
"IN COLD BLOOD" with Robert Blake and Scott 
Wilson. "King-sized, ambitious film made brilliantly 
from Truman Capote's reportorial 'novel.' Impressive 
dramatic document probing criminal mind and 
society's reaction. Detail and understatement 
strengthens impact of crime and the answering of it 
with capital punishment" - Cue. 

8:00 p.m. Basketball: Duke vs. University of South 
Carolina Indoor Stadium. 

8:15 p.m. The Chamber Arts Society: Igor Kipnis, 
Harpsichordist. Music Room, East Duke Building. 



Sunday, February 9 



10:30-10:45 a.m. Carillon Recital. Mr. J. Samuel 

Hammond, University Carillonneur. 
11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship. University 

Chapel. Preacher: The Reverend Dr. Thomas E. 

McCollough, Associate Professor of Religioa Broadcast 

over Radio Station WDNC and WDNC-FM. 
2:30 p.m. Student Union Slide Lecture: "Appalachian 

Crafts." Thomas Gilmartin, Education Supervisor, 

Southern Highland Handicraft Guild, Asheville, N.C. 

West Union Lounge. 



4:00 p.m. Afro- American Symposium: Beauty of Black. 
Politics of Confrontation: James Turner, Department 
of African Studies, Northwestern University and John 
R. Lewis, Past President of SNCC and Chairman, 
Community Relations for Southern Regional Council. 
Page Auditorium 

4:00—6:00 p.m. International Open House. 2022 Campus 
Drive. 

7:00 and 9:20 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page Auditorium. 
"IN COLD BLOOD." 

7:30 p.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Challenges in 
Education." WPTF Raleigh. Dean Daniel Sampson and 
Professor Ernest Gellhorn will discuss "An 
Introduction to Legal Education." 



NOTICES for the Duke University Calendar 
should be submitted IN WRITTEN FORM to Room 
207 Flowers Building, not later than 5 p.m., Tuesday, 
Ext 2911. 



Published by Duke University Student Activities 
Department, Box KM, Duke Station, Durham, N.C., 
27706 each week when school is in session; 
Subscriptions: $2.50 per year. Address inquiries to 
Box KM, Duke Station, Durham, N.C., 27706. 
Application to mail at second class postage rates is 
pending at Durham, N.C. 



UNIVERSITY SERVICE OF WORSHIP 

Holy Communion will be celebrated at the University 
Service of Worship at 11:00 a.m. on Sunday, February 2nd, 
in the University Chapel. The Celebrant will be The 
Reverend Professor James T. Cleland, Dean of the Chapel. 
The Reverend Dr. Howard C. Wilkinson, Chaplain to the 
University, will preach the communion meditation. 



DUKE PLAYERS TRYOUTS 
"DARK OF THE MOON" 

Duke Players will hold tryouts for their next major 
production, "Dark of the Moon" (by Howard Richardson 
and William Berney), on Monday and Tuesday, February 
3rd and 4th from 3:00 until 5:00 p.m. and from 7:00 until 
9:00 p.m. in Page Auditorium. Rehearsals will begin 
Sunday afternoon, February 9th and the play will be 
presented on Friday and Saturday, March 14th and 15th. 

"Dark of the Moon" is a highly theatrical play, based 
upon the ballad of "Barbara Allen." It is set in the Smokey 
Mountains of North Carolina and tells the story of a 
witch-boy who falls in love with a mortal girl. 

The play offers a wide variety of roles in a cast of 
approximately thirty. Singers and dancers are needed, but 
the majority of the roles in the show require neither of 
these skills. The tryouts are open to all members of the 
university community. The Players are particularly eager to 
broaden the scope of their activities by recruiting new 
participants. Persons who do not wish to act, but who 
would like to work on the production staff, should stop by 



the tryouts and give this information to Mr. Richard Parks, 
the play's director. Further information may ba obtained 
by calling Mr. Parks at 684-3181. 

ZOOLOGY SEMINAR 

The Department of Zoology will hold a seminar on 
Monday, February 3rd, at 4:15 p.m. in Room 111 
Biological Sciences Building. Dr. Burke J. Hill, temporary 
instructor of Zoology, will speak on "Temperature 
Tolerances of an Estuarine Mud Prawn." Dr. Hill is a 
graduate of the University of Stellenbosch and Rhodes 
University, South Africa, where he worked on prawns and 
estuarine ecology before coming to Duke as a temporary 
instructor. Coffee and tea will be served at 4:00 p.m. 

ERASMUS CLUB MEETING 

The Erasmus Club will meet at 8:15 p.m. on Monday, 
February 3rd, in the Green Room, East Duke Building. The 
speaker will be W.D. Davies, G.W. Ivey Professor of 
Christian Origins. His topic will be "Judaism and 
Christianity: Jerusalem, Rome, and Moscow." 

Prior to his return to Duke in 1966, where he had taught 
from 1950 to 1955, Professor Davies held distinguished 
chairs at Princeton University and Union Theological 
Seminary. He has been the recipient of two honorary 
degrees by British universities and is a Corresponding 
Fellow of the British Academy. His scholarly interest lies in 
the Jewish background of the New Testament. In keeping 
with the aim of the Erasmus Club to offer papers of general 
interest in the Humanities, his talk will seek to explore the 
broader aspects of his scholarly concern. 



BUSINESS DIVISION SEMINAR 

The seventh in a series of seminars conducted by 
Business Division staff members will take place on Tuesday, 
February 4th, at 2:00 p.m. in the Medical School 
Auditorium. Mr. H.F. Bowers, Director of Operations, will 
talk on Campus security and traffic matters. Mr. Sherrill 
High will discuss grounds work; Mr. Seay will cover 
housekeeping; Mr. Goodwin, mail and messenger service 
and Mr. Hayes, the student laundry. 

GERONTOLOGY SEMINAR 

Dr. Frances M. Carp, Director, Human Development 
Research Program, American Institutes for Research, Palo 
Alto, California, will speak on "Social Integration of the 
Elderly" at the Duke University Council on Aging and 
Human Development. Dr. Carp is author of "A Future for 
the Aged" and Editor of "The Retirement Process." This 
open seminar will be held on Tuesday, February 4th, at 
4:00 p.m. in Room 1504 Gerontology Building, Duke 
Hospital. 

AFRO- AMERICAN SYMPOSIUM 
"BEAUTY OF BLACK" 

A week long symposium will be presented by the 
members of the Duke Afro-American Society from 
February 4th through 11th. The Symposium, entitled 



"Beauty of Black," is designed to educate the Duke 
Community to Black culture. The poetry, prose, soul food, 
art exhibit, and drama are intended to express the 
sentiment of the majority of the Afro-Americans on 
campus. Invited speakers include Maynard Jackson, Fannie 
Lou Hamer, Dick Gregory, James Turner and others. The 
Afro-American Society hopes that the message in their 
programs will be conveyed with few inhibitions and that a 
receptive audience will recognize through them the Black 
man's frustrations and anxieties. 

Those wishing to attend the Dick Gregory seminar or 
address on Monday, February 10th, should know the 
following information: Since seating is limited, tickets will 
be necessary for both the informal afternoon presentation 
and the evening address. Please call extension 2911 for 
further information. 

Please see Days of the Week for further information 
regarding the entire program. 



STUDENT UNION BROADWAY AT DUKE 
THE STROLLING PLAYERS WITH VIVECA LINDFORS 

The second performance in the Student Union Drama 
Series, "Broadway at Duke," will be a presentation by The 
Strolling Players with Viveca Lindfors on Wednesday, 
February 5th, at 8:15 p.m. in Page Auditorium. Almost a 
sell-out, a number of tickets priced at $2.00 are now 
available in Page Box Office. An open seminar will be led 
by Miss Lindfors at 3:00 p.m. in the Music Room, East 
Duke Building. 

The noted Swedish actress Viveca Lindfors is joined by 
five talented players in two contemporary one-act plays, 
"Cuba Si" by Terrence McNally and "Guns of Carrar" by 
Bertolt Brecht. The final portion of the evening entitled 
"Children of Paradise" is an exciting dramatic chronicle 
illuminating all aspects of our theatre today -- both classic 
and modern - and giving a startling new sense of the craft 
of theatre and the reality of the stage. 

Besides Miss Lindfors the members of the cast include 
James Catusi, Elizabeth Farley, Bill Macy, Kristoffer 
Tabori, and Paul John Austin. 

Recent winner of the Best Actress Award at the Berlin 
Film Festival for her part in "No Exit" and the special 
award at the Venice Film Festival for "Weddings and 
Babies" and "The Damned," Viveca Lindfors is no stranger 
to high praise for her talents. Born in Sweden, Miss 
Lindfors graduated from Sweden's Royal Dramatic Theatre 
School and embarked on a career in her native country. 
Before coming to the United States, she had made some 
forty movies including "Four in a Jeep" for which she 
received the "Best Actress of the Year" International Film 
Award. 

Her first Broadway Part was the title role in "Anastasia" 
which she repeated for CBS television. Her versatility is 
eevident in the broad range of productions in which she has 
starred, from the revival of the musical "Pal Joey" at the 
New York City Center to the off-Broadway production of 
"King Lear" and "Miss Julie." She has toured extensively. 
Miss Lindfors has been seen on television in "The Idiot," 
CBS's Camera Three and the special production of Thorton 
Wilder's "The Bridge of San Luis Rey." Now an American 
citizen, Miss Lindfors is married to Hungarian-born novelist 
and playwright George Tabori. 



KAPPA DELTA PI LUNCHEON MEETING 
Kappa Delta Pi will meet on Thursday, February 6th, at 
12:30 p.m. in the East Campus Union. Dr. Carl Eisdorfer 
will speak on "Education for the Older Generations." 

DEAN'S HOUR 
The Dean's Hour will be held on Thursday, February 
6th, from 5:00 to 6:00 p.m. in the Hospital Amphitheater. 
Dr. Edward C. Franklin, Professor of Medicine, New York 
University Medical Center, will speak on "Errors in Protein 
Elaboration." 



SPECIAL SEMINARS 
DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY 

Beginning on Thursday, February 6th, the Department 
of Zoology will hold a series of special seminars through the 
spring semester. They will be held in Room 130 Biological 
Sciences Building from 7:00 to 9:00 p.m. Dr. George M. 
Hughes will speak on topics concerning Comparative 
Vertebrate Respiration. 

FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 
The final examination of Mr. Charles Henry Racine for 
the Ph.D. degree in Botany will be held on Friday, 
February 7th, at 9:00 a.m in Room 140 Biological 
Sciences Building. The subject of Mr. Racine's dissertation 
is "Tree Reproduction in Relation to Vegetational and 
Environmental Gradients on SloDes in the Southern Blue 
Ridge." The committee to conduct the examination consists 
of Professors W.D. Billings, L.E. Anderson, Henry Hellmers, 
T.W. Johnson, C.W. Ralston. Professor Billings will preside. 

PLANT ECOLOGY SEMINAR 

Mr. Tad Weaver, graduate student in Botany, will present 
a seminar on "Gradients of the North Carolina Fall-line 
Sand Hills: Oaks, Vegetation, and Environment" at the 
Plant Ecology Seminar on Friday, February 7th, at 12:30 
p.m. in Room 144 Biological Sciences Building. 



CHEMISTRY STAFF SEMINAR 

Dr. D. Stanley Tarbell, Department of Chemistry, 
Vanderbilt University, will speak at the Chemistry Staff 
Seminar on Friday, February 7th, at 3:30 p.m. in Room 
130 Psychology— Sociology Building. The subject of Dr. 
Tarbell's address will be "Studies on Methoxonium Ions." 
A'l interested persons are cordially invited to attend. 

INDIAN FILM SHOWING: "ANUPAMA' 
Indian students at Duke will present "Anupama," an 
Indian movie with English sub-titles on Saturday, February 
8th, at 7:00 p.m. in the Biological Sciences Auditorium. 
There will be an admission charge of $1.00. "Anupama" 
won the President of India's Silver Medal for the Best Hindi 
Movie of 1967. It is directed by Hrishikesh Mukherjee and 
has music by Hemant Kumar. Included in the cast are 
Dharmendra, Sharmila Tagore and Shashikala. 



CHAMBER ARTS SOCIETY 
IGOR KIPNIS, HARPSICHORDIST 

The Chamber Arts Society will present, for the fifth 

concert of its current season, a harpsichord recital by Igor 

Kipnis. His program is the following: 

Suite No. 2 in G Minor 

Ciaccona in D Major 

Pavan in A Minor 

Chromatic Fantasy and Fugue 

in D Minor (BWV 903) 

kNach Bach: Fantasy for 
Harpsichord, 1966 
(dedicated to Igor Kipnis) 
Les Fastes de la grande 
et Ancienne Menestrandise 
Fandango 



D. Zipoli 
J.J. Fux 
T. Tomkins 

J.S. Bach 



G. Rochberg 

F. Couperin 
P. A. Soler 



Admission is by Membership Card or by Guest Card. Guest 
Cards in limited number, up to the total room capacity of 
440 seats, will be available from 7:30 to 8:00 p.m. at the 
door of the Music Room before the concert. Guest Cards 
are priced at $2.50 for a single admission, and may not be 
reserved in advance except by members of the Society. 
Inquiries may be addressed to The Chamber Arts Society, 
Box 6065 College Station. 

The final concert of the season will be given Saturday, 
March 22nd, by The Fine Arts String Quartet and will 
include quartets by Bartok (3d), Haydn (Op. 76-1), and 
Brahms (Op. 51-2). 

STUDENT UNION EXHIBITION 

"APPALACHIAN CRAFTS'" 

SLIDE-LECTURE 

The Student Union Graphic Arts Committee will present 
an exhibition of Appalachian Crafts in the West Union 
Lounge from Sunday, February 9th until Friday, February 
28th. The exhibiton of crafts by members of the nine-state 
Southern Highland Handicraft Guild will exhibit samplings 
of pottery, weaving, jewelry, woodwork, glass, candles, 
sculpture, batik, hooked rugs, printworking, cornshuck, 
vegetable dyeing and various graphic materials. 

A special slide-lecture and gallery talk will be given in 
the West Union Lounge area at 2:30 p.m. on Sunday, 
February 9th by Mr. Thomas Gilmartin, Education 
Supervisor of the Southern Highland Handicraft Guild, 
headquartered in Asheville. The Guild, a non-profit 
organization serving the craftsmen of Southern Appalachia, 
seeks to encourage a wider appreciation of mountain crafts 
and to raise and maintain standards of design and 
craftsmanship. 



APPOINTMENTS OFFICE ANNOUNCEMENT 

All students graduating in June 1969, Summer 1969, 
and January 1970 are reminded that interviewing for 
permanent employment in business or education will begin 
on Monday, February 3rd. A schedule of representation is 
available in Room 214 Flowers Building. Seniors are urged 
to take advantage of this opportunity. In addition, some 
companies will be interviewing other interested students for 
summer employment. 



DUKE ARTISTS SERIES 

The Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra with Leopold Sipe 
conducting will replace the Philadelphia Chamber Orchestra 
on the 1968-69 Artists Series. The date for this 
performance will be Sunday, February 23rd, at 8:15 p.m. 
in Page Auditorium. Tickets imprinted for the Philadelphia 
Chamber Orchestra should be used for this performance. 

The Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra and its conductor 
Leopold Sipe are a modern ensemble molded from the great 
tradition of assembled virtuosi playing as one, but with a 
spirit of excitement and youthful vigor to make every 
concert experience a challenge. The orchestra of 
twenty-two members includes strings, woodwinds, and a 
harpsichord. Its players have been selected from Europe 
and America for a new kind of combined musicianship. 

Season tickets priced at $13.00, $11.00, and $9.00 are 
available in Page Box Office. A check payable to Duke 
University Artists Series should accompany orders and 
should be mailed to Box KM Duke Station, Durham, North 
Carolina. Call 684-4059 for further information. All 
concerts will be held in Page Auditorium at 8:15 p.m. 

Individual tickets for all concerts, priced at $3.25, 
$2.75, and $2.25, will be available at the Page Box Office 
beginning Monday, February 10th. 



Wed., Feb. 26, 1969 

Wed., Mar. 5, 1969 

Wed., Mar. 19, 1969 
Fri., Apr. 11,1969 



The Goldovsky Grand 

Opera "Carmen" 

Clifford Curzon, 

pianist 

The Harkness Ballet 

Shirley Verrett, 

soprano 



GRADUATE SCHOOL 
FOREIGN LANGUAGE TEST 

Registration is now open for the ETS Graduate School 
Foreign Language Tests in French, German, Russian, and 
Spanish to be administered on Saturday, April 12th. 
Register at the University Counseling Center, Room 309 
Flowers Building. Registration fee is $8.00, payable by 
check, money order, or Bursar's Office cash receipt. Cash 
can not be accepted. Deadline for registration is Thursday, 
March 6th. Please note: ETS originally scheduled this test 
for Saturday, April 19th, as announced in the Graduate 
School Bulletin, but it has been changed to Saturday, April 
12th. 



DUKE UNIVERSITY 
OFFICIAL DOCTORAL APPAREL 

A special Duke-blue doctoral gown has been authorized 
for holders of the doctoral degree from the Duke University 
Graduate School (Arts and Sciences). The new gown will be 
worn by doctoral candidates at the commencement 
exercises in June, 1969. The new apparel may be purchased 
and tailored to individual measurements, or may be rented 
from the Duke University Stores. 



SUMMER 1969 
EUROPEAN GROUP FLIGHTS 

For the eighth consecutive year, the Student Activities 
Office 202-A Flowers Building, is offering Duke European 
Group Fare Flights to members of the Duke University 
Community (faculty, staff, students, and employees). The 
Activities Office will provide tickets only for economy class 
jet air transportation. All other arrangements are the 
responsibility of the individual. 

All faculty, staff, students, and employees of Duke 
University are eligible who have been associated with Duke 
for six months prior to departure times. 

Dates... 

Flight 1 (Wash.,) Pan Am June 9 (Paris) Pan Am Aug. 26 
Flight 2 (NYC) Air India June 9( London) Air India Aug. 28 
Flight 3 (NYC) Air India June 10 (Lon.) Air India July 14 
Flight 4 (NYC) Pan Am July 23 (London) Pan Am Aug. 27 



Fares.. 



Minimum of 25 persons 



NYC to London 

Adult $300.00 

Child (12 & over) .300.00 

Child (2-11) 150.00 

Child (under 2) .... 30.00 



Washington to Paris 

Adult $363.80 

Child (12 & over) .363.80 

Child (2-11) 181.90 

Child (under 2) .... 36.40 



Minimum of 50 persons 



NYC to London 

Adult $245.00 

Child (12& over) ..245.00 

Child (2-11) 122.50 

Child (under 12) ... 24.50 



Washington to Paris 

Adult $297.80 

Child (12 & over) .297.80 

Child (2-11) 148.90 

Child (under 2) .... 29.80 



(All fares are effective as of 1 April 1968) 

Child's fare is based on age on date of flight departure. No 
deposit required for children under 12. 

Application forms are available at the Flowers Information 
Desk and Room 207 Flowers Building. 



SPECIAL UNIVERSITY ANNOUNCEMENTS 

Doctor Philip Handler, Chairman of the Department of 
Biochemistry, has been elected President of the National 
Academy of Sciences. A search committee to recommend a 
new chairman to take Professor Handler's place has been 
appointed; Dr. James B. Wyngaarden, Chairman; Dr. Rubin 
Bressler, Dr. Donald J. Fluke, Dr. W.K. Joklik, Dr. Samuel 
L. Katz, and Dr. William R. Krigbaum. 



The expiration date for the following parking decals is 
extended until September 30, 1969: D, E, H, N, MO, C, S. 



Application to mail at second class 
postage is pending at Durham, N.C. 






Duke University 

CALENDAR^ 




Feb. 9-1C, 1969 



Volume 69 



Published Feb. 7, 1969 



Number 6 



Sunday, February 9 



10:30-10:45 a.m. Carillon Recital. Mr. J. Samuel 
Hammond, University Carillonneur. 

11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship. University 
Chapel. Preacher: The Reverend Dr. Thomas E. 
McCollough, Associate Professor of Religion. Sermon: 
"Society and the System." Broadcast over Radio 
Station WDNC and WDNC-FM. 

11:25 a.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Challenges in 
Education." WCHL Chapel Hill. Dr. Edgar Thompson 
will discuss "Continuity and Change in the Bible Belt." 

2:30 p.m. Student Union Slide Lecture: "Appalachian 
Crafts." West Union Lounge. Speaker: Mr. Thomas 
Gilmartin. 

4:00 p.m. Afro-American Symposium: Beauty of Black. 
Speaker: Mr. James Turner. Page Auditorium. 

4:00—6:00 p.m. International Open House. 2022 Campus 
Drive. 

7:00—9:00 p.m. Sorority Rush Formal Parties. Various 
East Campus Meeting Rooms. 

7:00 and 9:20 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page Auditorium. 
'IN COLD BLOOD" with Robert Blake and Scott 
Wilson. "King-sized, ambitious film made brilliantly 
from Truman Capote's reportorial 'novel.' Impressive 
dramatic document probing criminal mind and 
society's reaction. Detail and understatement 
strengthens impact of crime and the answering of it 
with capital punishment." —Cue. 

7:30 p.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Challenges in 
Education." WPTF Raleigh. Dean Daniel Sampson and 
Professor Ernest Gellhorn will discuss "An 
Introduction to Legal Education." 



Monday, February 10 



3:15 p.m. Afro-American Symposium: Beauty of Black 

and Student Union Major Speakers Series. Dick 

Gregory. Page Auditorium. 
3:30 p.m. Civil Engineering Seminar. Room 117 

Engineering Building. Speaker: Mr. Harold J. Gibbs. 
4:00 p.m. Department of Religion Lecture. Room 136 

Social Science Building. Speaker: Rabbi Marc 

Tanenbaum 



4:15 p.m. Zoology Seminar. Room 111 Biological Sciences 

Building. Speaker: Dr. Joseph R. Bailey. 
4:15—5:30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 

faculty, staff members, and students. 
5: 15 p.m. Faculty Volleyball. Card Gymnasium. 
6:15 p.m. AAUW Meeting. YWCA, Chapel Hill Street. 

Speaker: Mrs. Erika Richey. 
7:00 p.m. International Folk Dancing. The Ark, East 

Campus. 
8:00 p.m. Basketball: Duke vs. University of Maryland. 

College Park, Maryland. 
8:15 p.m. Afro-American Symposium: Beauty of Black 

and Student Union Major Speakers Series. Dick 

Gregory. Page Auditorium. 
8:15—9:30 p.m. West Campus Swimming Pool open to 

faculty members and their families. Faculty children 

will be admitted only when accompanied by their 

parents. 



Tuesday, February 11 

10:00 a.m. Divinity School Chapel Service. University 

Chapel. Speaker: Dr. M.O. Williams, Jr. 
10:00 a.m. Afro-American Symposium: Beauty of Black. 

Seminar with Mrs. Fannie Lou Hamer. Room 101 West 

Union Building. 
2:00 p.m. Afro-American Symposium: Beauty of Black. 

Green Room, East Duke Building. Speaker: Mr. Ben 

Ruffin. 
3:00—5:00 p.m. Campus Club Tea. University House. 1508 

Pinecrest Road. 
4:00 p.m. Afro-American Symposium: Beauty of Black. 

Seminar with Maynard Jackson. Room 101 West Union 

Building. 
4:15—5:30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 

faculty, staff members, and students. 
7:00 p.m. Student Union Drama Festival Lecture. Room 

208 Flowers Building. Speaker: Mr. Kenneth M. Olsen. 
7:30-10:00 p.m. Scottish Country Dancing. Presbyterian 

Student Center. 
7: 30 p.m. Debate Team Meeting. Room 139 Social Science 

Building. 
8:00 p.m. Duke-UNC Joint Slavic Colloquium. Faculty 

Lounge, Dey Hall, University of North Carolina. 

Speaker: Professor Clarence F. Brown, Jr. 
8:15 p.m. Music Department Recital: Henry Hester, 

Pianist. Music Room, East Duke Building. 
8:15 p.m. Afro-American Symposium: Beauty of Black. 

Major Addresses by Maynard Jackson and Mrs. Fannie 

Lou Hamer. Page Auditorium. 



Wednesday; February 12 

10:00 a.m. Divinity School Chapel Service. University 

Chapel. Speaker: The Reverend Jack Smith. 
12:30 p.m. Plant Ecology Seminar. Room 130 Biological 

Sciences Building. Speaker: Dr. Harold A. Mooney. 
4:15—5:30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 

faculty, staff members, and students. 
6:00 p.m. Freshman Basketball: Duke vs. Wake Forest. 

Indoor Stadium. 
7:00—8:30 p.m. Chapel Choir Rehearsal. University 

Chapel. 
7:00—9:00 p.m. Open House Badminton for all men and 

women: faculty and students. East Campus 

Gymnasium. 
8:00 p.m. Basketball: Duke vs. Wake Forest. Indoor 

Stadium. 



Thursday, February 13 



10:00 a.m. Divinity School Chapel Service. University 

Chapel. Speaker: Mr. James E. Creech. 
4:00 p.m. Psychology Colloquium. Room 136 Social 

Science Building. Speaker: Dr. Sarnoff Mednick. 
4:00 p.m. Undergraduate Faculty Council Meeting. Room 

208 Flowers Building. 
4:15—5:30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 

faculty, staff members, and students. 
5:00—6:00 p.m. Dean's Hour. Hospital Amphitheater. 

Speaker: Dr. D. Carleton Gajdusek. 
5:15 p.m. Faculty Volleyball. Card Gymnasium. 
7:30 p.m. German Film: "Faust." Auditorium, Biological 

Sciences Building. 
8:15—9:30 p.m. West Campus Swimming Pool open to 

faculty members and their families. Faculty children 

will be admitted only when accompanied by their 

parents. 



Friday, February 14 



10:00 a.m. Divinity School Chapel Service. University 
Chapel. Dedication Service honoring graduates in 
mission service. Dean Robert E. Cushman presiding. 

3:30 p.m. Chemistry Staff Seminar. Room 130 
Psychology— Sociology Building. Speaker: Professor 
Charles S. Johnson. 

4:15—5:30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. Faculty 
daughters, ages 6 to 16, may also swim: those 10 and 
under must be accompanied by their mothers. 

7:00—9:00 p.m. Open House Badminton for all men and 
women: faculty and students. East Campus 
Gymnasium. 

8:00 p.m. Student Union Cinematic Arts Committee Film 
Series: "Rules of the Game." (Jean Renoir) 
Auditorium, Biological Sciences Building. 

8: 15 p.m. Small Orchestra Concert. Page Auditorium. 

8:30 p.m. Graduate English Club Meeting. Green Room, 
East Duke Building. Speaker: Dr. Alan Price. 



Saturday, February 15 

10:55 a.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Challenges in 
Education." WDNC Durham. Dr. Edgar Thompson will 
discuss "Continuity and Change in the Bible Belt." 

3:00—5:00 p.m. East Campus Gymnasium: Open to 
students, faculty, and staff for recreation (swimming, 
badminton, volleyball, basketball, table tennis). 

7:30 and 9:00 p.m. Student Union Major Attraction Film: 
The Beatles in "Magical Mystery Tour." Page 
Auditorium. Tickets: $1.50 General Admission. 

8:00 p.m. Basketball: Duke vs. University of West Virginia. 
Charleston, West Virginia. 



Sunday, February 16 

10:30—10:45 a.m. Carillon Recital. Mr. J. Samuel 
Hammond, University Carillonneur. 

11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship. University 
Chapel. Preacher: The Reverend Professor James T. 
Cleland, Dean of the Chapel. Broadcast over Radio 
Station WDNC and WDNC-FM. 

11:25 a.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Challenges in 
Education." WCHL Chapel Hill. Dr. Orrin Pilkey will 
discuss "Black Shells: A Key to the Past." 

2:00 p.m. Student Union Arts Festival Seminar: Opera. 
Music Room, East Duke Building. Speaker: Dr. John 
Clum. 

4:00—6:00 p.m. International Open House. 2022 Campus 
Drive. 

7:00 and 9:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page Auditorium. 
"WHO'S AFRAID OF VIRGINIA WOOLF?" Edward 
Albee's stage play brought to the screen with Elizabeth 
Taylor, Richard Burton, George Segal and Sandy 
Dennis. A winner of five Academy Awards including 
Best Actress and Best Supporting Actress. 

7:30 p.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Challenges in 
Education." WPTF Raleigh. Dr. Chester Zmijewski will 
discuss "Quality Control Labs for Organ Transplants." 



NOTICES for the Duke University Calendar 
should be submitted IN WRITTEN FORM to Room 
207 Flowers Building, not later than 5:00 p.m., 
Tuesday, Ext. 2911. 

Published by Duke University Student Activities 
Department, Box KM, Duke Station, Durham, N.C., 
27706 each week when school is in session. 
Subscriptions: $2.50 per year. Address inquiries to 
Box KM, Duke Station, Durham, N.C. 27706. 
Second class postage paid at Durham, N.C. 



UNIVERSITY SERVICE OF WORSHIP 

The Reverend Dr. Thomas E. McCollough, Associate 
Professor of Religion, will deliver the sermon at the 
University Service of Worship on Sunday, February 9th, at 
11:00 a.m. in the University Chapel. The sermon topic is 
"Society and the System." 



STUDENT UNION EXHIBITION 

"APPALACHIAN CRAFTS" 

SLIDE-LECTURE 

The Student Union Graphic Arts Committee will present 
an exhibition of Appalachian Crafts in the West Union 
Lounge from Sunday, February 9th until Friday, February 
28th. The exhibition of crafts by members of the nine-state 
Southern Highland Handicraft Guild will exhibit samplings 
of pottery, weaving, jewelry, woodwork, glass, candles, 
sculpture, batik, hooked rugs, printworking, cornshuck, 
vegetable dyeing and various graphic materials. 

A special slide-lecture and gallery talk will be given in 
the West Union Lounge area at 2:30 p.m. on Sunday, 
February 9th, by Mr. Thomas Gilmartin, Education 
Supervisor of the Southern Highland Handicraft Guild, 
headquartered in Asheville. The Guild, a non-profit 
organization serving the craftsmen of Southern Appalachia, 
seeks to encourage a wider appreciation of mountain crafts 
and to raise and maintain standards of design and 
craftsmanship. 

AFRO- AMERICAN SYMPOSIUM 
"BEAUTY OF BLACK" 

The final sessions of the week-long symposium 
sponsored by the Afro-American Society will include 
seminars and major addresses by Dr. James Turner, 
Department of History, Northwestern University, speaking 
on "The Role of Black Students on White Campuses;" 
Maynard Jackson, Managing Attorney for the Emory 
University Legal Aid Service, speaking on the "American 
Political Dilemma;" Mrs. Fannie Lou Hamer, Mississippian, 
first Black woman to run for U.S. Congress from the state 
of Mississippi, speaking on "Politics of Liberation;" (both 
Mrs. Hamer and Mr. Jackson will present evening addresses 
on the topic, "Confrontation of a Dying System"); Dick 
Gregory, civil rights worker, comedian, and author; and Ben 
Ruffin, director of United Organization for Community 
Improvement and coordinator of Adult Education with 
Operation Breakthrough, speaking on "Tactics of the 
Minority." 

The time schedule for all sessions are listed in the Days 
of the Week. 

DICK GREGORY 
PUBLIC SEMINAR AND LECTURE 

Mr. Dick Gregory, well known comic, author and civil 
rights advocate will present a major address in Page 
Auditorium at 8:15 p.m. on Monday, February 10th. (The 
doors will open at 7:30 p.m.). Also, at 3:15 p.m., Mr. 
Gregory will participate in an informal panel discussion. His 
visit, presented in conjunction with Black Week, is 
sponsored by the Duke Student Union Major Speakers 
Committee and the Afro-American Society. Following Mr. 
Gregory's evening address there will be a reception in 
Flowers Lounge open to the general public. 

Because of limited seating, admission cards are 
necessitated; the remaining cards may be secured at the 
Page Box Office on Monday from nine until four-thirty 
p.m. 



CIVIL ENGINEERING SEMINAR 
Mr. Harold J. Gibbs, Chief, Soils Engineering Branch 



Bureau of Reclamation, Denver, Colorado, will speak on 
"Research Related to Soils Engineering in the Arid Western 
United States" at the Civil Engineering Seminar. The public 
is invited to this seminar which will be held on Monday, 
February 10th, at 3:30 p.m. in Room 117 Engineering 
Building. 



DEPARTMENT OF RELIGION LECTURE 

Rabbi Marc Tanenbaum will lecture in Room 136 Social 
Science Building at 4:00 p.m. on Monday, February 10th. 
His topic will be "The Middle East Crisis and the 
Jewish-Christian Dialogue." 



ZOOLOGY SEMINAR 

The Department of Zoology will hold a seminar on 
Monday, February 10th, at 4:15 p.m. in Room 111 
Biological Sciences Building. Dr. Joseph R. Bailey, 
Professor of Zoology, will speak on "Sibling Species and 
Species Flocks: A Result of the Synthetic Approach to 
Classification." A graduate of Haverford College and the 
University of Michigan, Dr. Bailey came to Duke in 1946. 
Although he has wide biological interests, particularly in 
the vertebrate, he is best known for his studies of 
southeastern fresh water fishes and the snakes of South 
America. Coffee and tea will be served at 4:00 p.m. 

AAUW MEETING 

The American Association of University Women, 
Durham Branch, will meet on Monday evening, February 
10th, at the YWCA on Chapel Hill Street to hear Mrs. Erika 
Richey speak on "The Establishment of State 
Kindergartens." Dinner will be at 6:15 p.m. by advance 
reservation; the program will begin at 7:00 p.m. All women 
college graduates in the Durham area are cordially invited. 



CAMPUS CLUB TEA 

The Campus Club of Duke University will have a tea on 
Tuesday, February 11th, from 3:00 to 5:00 p.m., at the 
University House, 1508 Pinecrest Road. There will be a 
display by the Department of Audiovisual Education. 
Co-chairmen for the event are Mrs. Douglas R. Jensen and 
Mrs. Seth Warner. Hostess departments are Mathematics 
and Student Affairs. 

DUKE DRAMA FESTIVAL 
KENNETH OLSEN SEMINAR 

The Student Union's Arts Festival Committee is 
coordinating the more than thirteen dramatic presentations 
being given on the Duke Campus during the next six weeks 
into a Festival of Drama. Besides the wide variety of plays, 
films, and operas being presented, a number of speakers 
have been invited to discuss the contemporary dramatic 
scene. 

The initial speaker is Kenneth M. Olsen, General 
Manager and Vice President of American Theatre 
Productions, Inc., a recognized authority on regional 
subscription theater. Mr. Olsen will speak on "The Public 



Ear and the Private Purse" on Tuesday, February 11th, at 
7:00 p.m. in Room 208 Flowers Building. This discussion is 
open to the public without charge. 

Brochures describing the entire festival are available at 
the Flowers Information Desk. 



DEBATE MEETING 

The first meeting of the semester for the Duke Debate 
team will be held at 7:30 p.m. on Tuesday, February 11th, 
in Room 139 Social Science Building. The meeting is open 
to all interested in participating in intercollegiate debate 
during the new semester. No prior debate experience is 
necessary. A demonstration debate will be given on the 
national debate topic concerning the desirability and 
possible methods of limiting executive control over foreign 
policy. Further information may be secured from Professor 
Joseph C. Wetherby, extension 3169. 

JOINT SLAVIC COLLOQUIUM 

Professor Clarence F. Brown, Jr. of Princeton University 
will speak "On Translating Mandel'sh f nm" at the Joint 
Slavic Colloquium on Tuesday, February 11th, at 8:00 p.m. 
in the Faculty Lounge of Dey Hall on the University of 
North Carolina campus. Professor Brown is engaged in a 
lengthy study of Osip Emil'evich Mandel'shtam 
(1892-1940), a poet who gained great renown in the 
1920's. The public is cordially invited. 

MUSIC DEPARTMENT RECITAL 
HENRY HESTER, PIANIST 

Mr. Henry Hester, part-time staff associate teaching 
piano in the Duke Department of Music, will present a 
recital on Tuesday, February 11th, at 8:15 p.m. in the 
Music Room, East Duke Building. Mr. Hester is a graduate 
of Duke University and a former student of Loren Withers, 
director of piano studies, Department of Music. 

The concert, open to the public without charge, will 
include the following selections: 

Prelude and Fugue in D Minor, Book II J.S. Bach 
Prelude and Fugue in E Major, Book II J.S. Bach 

Sonata in D Major, K. 311 W.A. Mozart 

Allegro con spirito 
Andante con espressione 
Rondeau; Allegro 
Ballade in A-flat Major, Opus 47 F. Chopin 

Arabesque, Opus 18 R. Schumann 

Sonatine pour le piano M. Ravel 

Modere 

Mouvt de Menuet 
Anime 

PLANT ECOLOGY SEMINAR 

Dr. Harold A. Mooney of the Department of Biological 
Sciences, Stanford University, will present a seminar on 
Physiological Plant Ecology at the Plant Ecology Seminar 
on Wednesday, February 12th, at 12:30 p.m. in Room 130 
Biological Sciences Building. 

UNDERGRADUATE FACULTY COUNCIL MEETING 

The Undergraduate Faculty Council will meet on 
Thursday, February 13th, at 4:00 p.m. in Room 208 
Flowers Building. 



PSYCHOLOGY COLLOQUIUM 

The Department of Psychology will hold a colloquium 
on Thursday, February 13th, in Room 136 Social Science 
Building, at 4:00 p.m. Dr. Sarnoff Mednick, Professor at 
the New School for Social Research will speak on 
"Breakdown in Children at High Risk of Schizophrenia." 

DEAN'S HOUR 

The Dean's Hour will be held on Thursday, February 
13th, from 5:00 to 6:00 p.m. in the Hospital 
Amphitheater. Dr. D. Carleton Gajdusek, National Institute 
of Neurological Diseases and Stroke, National Institutes of 
Health, Bethesda, Maryland, will speak on "New and Old 
Diseases in Isolated Pacific Populations." 

GERMAN FILM: "FAUST" 

The Duke Chapter of Delta Phi Alpha and the German 
Table are co-sponsoring the presentation of the Gustaf 
Gruendgens' film version of Johann Wolfgang von Goethe's 
"Faust" (Part One) to be shown on Thursday evening, 
February 13th, at 7:30 p.m. in the Biological Sciences 
Auditorium. Admission at the door will be $.50. 

This filmed version of the first part of Goethe's two-part 
dramatic masterwork is in color and in German with brief 
English subtitles explaining the action. The film is 
photographed in an impressionistic style on a simple studio 
stage. It re-creates Gustaf Gruendgens' historic production 
in the Deutsches Schauspielhaus in Hamburg and his later 
production at the City Center in New York. As on the 
stage, Gruendgens plays brilliantly the role of the devil, 
Mephistopheles. 

"Tastefully staged by Gruendgens -- this is purposely a 
frank example of a color-photographed play, which derives 
its visual characteristics more from stage-craft than cinema. 
Its eloquence comes from the richness with which the 
actors deliver the classic verse, its glitter and bounce from 
the resilience with which Gruendgens plays Mephisto." — 
New York Times. 



CHEMISTRY STAFF SEMINAR 

Professor Charles S. Johnson, Department of Chemistry, 
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, will speak at 
the Chemistry Staff Seminar on Friday, February 14th, at 
3:30 p.m. in Room 130 Psychology— Sociology Building. 
The subject of Professor Johnson's address will be 
"Electron Exchange Reactions as Studied by Electron Spin 
Resonance." All interested persons are cordially invited to 
attend. 



SMALL ORCHESTRA CONCERT 

A 40-piece chamber orchestra comprised of selected 
members of the Duke Symphony Orchestra will present a 
concert on Friday evening, February 14th, at 8:15 p.m. in 
Page Auditorium. In addition to the orchestral selections, 
chamber works featuring several outstanding soloists will be 
presented. Their combined talents will form the unique 
aspect of this concert which will be conducted by Allan 
Bone. The public is cordially invited to attend. There will 
be no admission charge. 



The program follows: 
Symphony No. 8 
Brandenburg Concerto No. 5 
Giorgio Ciompi, violin 
James Weber, flute 
Susan Webb, harpsichord 
Recitative and Rondo 
"Ch'io mi scordi di te?" 
Mary Burgess, soprano 
Betty Talbot, piano 
Concerto for Guitar and Orchestra 

Bunyan Webb, guitar 
Rounds for String Orchestra 



Boyce 
Bach 



Mozart 



Bresgen 



Diamond 



GRADUATE ENGLISH CLUB MEETING 

Dr. Alan Price, Senior Lecturer in English at Queen's 
University, Belfast, will lecture on "J.M. Synge and the 
Making of a Play." Dr. Price, visiting Professor at the 
University of North Carolina at Greensboro, is the author 
of "Synge and Angle-Irish Drama," "Synge's 
Autobiography," and "Synge's Riders and Playboy." He 
has edited Synge's prose for the Oxford University Press. 
The public is cordially invited to the meeting which will be 
held in the Green Room, East Duke Building, at 8:30 p.m. 
on Friday, February 14th. 



DUKE ARTISTS SERIES 

The Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra with Leopold Sipe 
conducting will replace the Philadelphia Chamber Orchestra 
on the 1968-69 Artists Series. The date for this 
performance will be Sunday, February 23rd, at 8:15 p.m. 
in Page Auditorium. Tickets imprinted for the Philadelphia 
Chamber Orchestra should be used for this performance. 

The Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra and its conductor 
Leopold Sipe are a modern ensemble molded from the great 
tradition of assembled virtuosi playing as one, but with a 
spirit of excitement and youthful vigor to make every 
concert experience a challenge. The orchestra of 
twenty-two members includes strings, woodwinds, and a 
harpsichord. Its players have been selected from Europe 
and America for a new kind of combined musicianship. 

Season tickets priced at $13.00, $11.00, and $9.00 are 
available in Page Box Office. A check payable to Duke 
University Artists Series should accompany orders and 
should be mailed to Box KM Duke Station, Durham, North 
Carolina. Call 684-4059 for further information. All 
concerts will be held in Page Auditorium at 8: 15 p.m. 

Individual tickets for all concerts, priced at $3.25, 
$2.75, and $2.25, will be available at the Page Box Office 
beginning Monday, February 10th. 



Sun., Feb. 23, 1969 

Wed., Feb. 26, 1969 

Wed., Mar. 5, 1969 

Wed., Mar. 19, 1969 
Fri., Apr. 11, 1969 



The Saint Paul 

Chamber Orchestra 
The Goldovsky Grand 

Opera "Carmen" 
Clifford Curzon, 

pianist 
The Harkness Ballet 
Shirley Verrett, 
soprano 



SUMMER 1969 
EUROPEAN GROUP FLIGHTS 

For the eighth consecutive year, the Student Activities 
Office, 202-A Flowers Building, is offering Duke European 
Group Fare Flights to members of the Duke University 
Community (faculty, staff, students, and employees). The 
Activities Office will provide tickets only for economy class 
jet air transportation. All other arrangements are the 
responsibility of the individual. 

All faculty, staff, students, and employees of Duke 
University are eligible who have been associated with Duke 
for six months prior to departure times. 



Dates . . . 

Flight 1 (Wash.) Pan Am June 9 
Flight 2 (NYC) Air India June 9 
Flight 3 (NYC) Air India June 10 
Flight 4 (NYC) Pan Am July 23 



(Paris) Pan Am Aug. 26 
(Lon.) Air India Aug. 28 
(Lon.) Air India July 14 

(Lon.) Pan Am Aug. 27 



Fares. 



Minimum of 25 persons 



NYC to London 

Adult $300.00 

Child (12 & over) 300.00 
Child (2-11) . . . 150.00 
Child (under 2) . . .30.00 



Washington to Paris 

Adult $363.80 

Child ( 12 & over) 363.80 
Child (2-11) . . . 181.90 
Child (under 2) . . .36.40 



Minimum of 50 persons 



NYC to London 

Adult $245.00 

Child ( 12 & over) 245.00 
Child (2-11) . . . 122.50 
Child (under 2) . . .24.50 



Washington to Paris 

Adult $297.80 

Child ( 12 & over) 297.80 
Child (2-11) . . . 148.90 
Child (under 2) . . .29.80 



(All fares are effective as of 1 April 1968) 
Child's fare is based on age on date of flight departure. No 
deposit required for children under 12. 

Application forms are available at the Flowers Information 
Desk and Room 207 Flowers Building. 

DUKE SEMESTER CALENDAR 

Copies of the Duke University Spring Semester Calendar 
have now been distributed throughout the campus and 
mailed to all faculty, staff and University Calendar 
subscribers. Those not receiving a calendar may secure one 
from the Flowers Information Desk beginning Monday, 
February 17th. 

OPENINGS AVAILABLE 
CHILDREN'S CORNER PLAYSCHOOL 

The Children's Corner Playschool, originally organized 
by the Duke Graduate Wives for their children, is now 
accepting applications from faculty and community parents 
for the school year 1969—70. All sessions are held in the 
Erwin Auditorium building on Erwin Road and the days for 
the different age groups are: for three year olds, sessions are 
held on Tuesdays and Thursdays and for four year olds, the 
days are Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays. All groups will 
meet from 9:00 a.m. until 12:00 noon. Further 
information is available from Mrs. C. F. Starmer at 
286-7007. 



DURHAM THEATRE GUILD PRESENTS 
PINTER'S "THE HOMECOMING" 

The Durham Theatre Guild will present Harold Pinter's 
play "The Homecoming" at the Allied Arts Center on 
Proctor Street two week-ends starting February 7th. Mark 
Schoenburg of the Carolina Playmakers staff is directing the 
cast of triangle area residents including Lloyd Borstelman, 
Harvey Sage, and Fritz Engelbart from Durham; Rick 
Spencer, Dorothy and Marvin Silver from Chapel Hill. For 
ticket information and reservations, call the Allied Arts 
Center in Durham, 682-5519. The play dates are February 
7th, 8th, 9th, and 14th, 15th, and 16th. 

MATINEE TICKETS AVAILABLE 
"MAN OF LA MANCHA" 

The Student Union Drama Committee announces the 
availability of matinee tickets for "Man of la Mancha" to be 
presented on Friday, February 21st. The tickets, priced at 
$5.25, $4.50, and $4.00, are available at the Page Box 
Office. The evening performance is completely sold out. 
The leads for the musical will be David Atkinson and 
Patricia Marand. 






SPECIAL UNIVERSITY ANNOUNCEMENTS 

The following have been appointed by the President to 
serve on a search committee for a Dean of the School of 
Forestry: Professor Paul Kramer, Chairman; Mr. Thomas A. 
Finch, Jr., as a Trustee representative, Professor Robert 
Barnes, Professor David Yandle, and Professor Frederick C. 
Joerg. 



Duke University 

CALENDAR. 



\ LA ! 




Feb. 16-23, 1969 



Volume 69 



Published Feb. 14, 1969 



Number 7 



Sunday, February 16 



10:30—10:45 a.m. Carillon Recital. Mr. J. Samuel 
Hammond, University Carillonneur. 

11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship. University 
Chapel. Preacher: The Reverend James T. Cleland, 
Dean of the Chapel. Sermon: "A Parable With a 
Twist." Broadcast over Radio Station WDNC and 
WDNC-FM. 

11:25 a.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Challenges in 
Education." WCHL Chapel Hill. Dr. Orrin Pilkey will 
discuss "Black Shells: A Key to the Past." 

2:00 p.m. Student Union Arts Festival Seminar: Opera. 
Music Room, East Duke Building. Speaker: Dr. John 
Clum. 

2:00 p.m. Rugby: Duke vs. Clemson. East Campus Field. 

4:00—6:00 p.m. International Open House. 2022 Campus 
Drive. 

6:00 p.m. Baha'i Fellowship: Slide Presentation, "A 
Pilgrimage to the Holy Land Through Slides." Cottage 
I, N.C.C. Corner George and Fayetteville Streets. 

7:00 and 9:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page Auditorium. 
"WHO'S AFRAID OF VIRGINIA WOOLF?" Edward 
Albee's stage play brought to the screen with Elizabeth 
Taylor, Richard Burton, George Segal and Sandy 
Dennis. A winner of five Academy Awards including 
Best Actress and Best Supporting Actress. 

7:30 p.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Challenges in 
Education." WPTF Raleigh. Dr. Chester Zmijewski will 
discuss "Quality Control Labs for Organ Transplants." 



Monday, February 17 



Hoof 'n Horn Tryouts 
Business Without Really 



for "How to 
Trying." Page 



1:00-5:00 p.m. 

Succeed in 

Auditorium. 
4:00 p.m. Southern Asia Studies Lecture on Education. 

Room 125 Engineering Building. Speaker: Dr. Margaret 

Cormack. 
4:15 p.m. Zoology Seminar. Room 111 Biological Sciences 

Building. Speaker: Dr. William J. Hamilton III. 
4: 15—5: 30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 

faculty, staff members, and students. 
5: 15 p.m. Faculty Volleyball. Card Gymnasium. 
6:00 p.m. Freshman Basketball: Duke vs. University of 

Virginia. Indoor Stadium. 
7:00 p.m. International Folk Dancing. The Ark, East 

Campus. 



7:00—10:00 p.m. Hoof 'n Horn Tryouts. Page Auditorium. 
8:00 p.m. Basketball: Duke vs. University of Virginia. 

Indoor Stadium. 
8:15—9:30 p.m. West Campus Swimming Pool open to 

faculty members and their families. Faculty children 

will be admitted only when accompanied by their 

parents. 



Tuesday, February 18 

10:00 a.m. Divinity School Chapel Service. University 

Chapel. Speaker: Dr. Chancie D. Barclift, District 

Superintendent, Durham District. 
10:00 a.m. Duke Law Forum. Law School Courtroom. 

Speaker: Mr. Harold Classen. 
2:00 p.m. Business Division Seminar. Medical Center 

Auditorium. Speakers: Mr. James Ward and Mr. 

William A. Bowden. 
2:00-5:00 p.m. Hoof 'n Horn Tryouts for "How to 

Succeed in Business Without Really Trying." Page 

Auditorium. 
4:15—5:30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 

faculty, staff members, and students. 
7:00 p.m. Student Union Drama Festival Lecture. Room 

208 Flowers Building. Speaker: Mr. Kenneth M. Olsen. 
7:30 p.m. Tocqueville Society Meeting. Room 101 Union 

Building. 
7:30—10:00 p.m. Scottish Country Dancing. Presbyterian 

Student Center. 
8:15 p.m. Student Union Major Speakers Last Lecture 

Series: Dr. Thomas McCollough, Department of 

Religion. Music Room, East Duke Building. 

Wednesday, February 19 

10:00 a.m. Divinity School Chapel Service. University 

Chapel. Ash Wednesday Service. 
4:15—5:30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 

faculty, staff members, aand students. 
7:00—8:30 p.m. Chapel Choir Rehearsal. University 

Chapel. 
7:00—9:00 p.m. Open House Badminton for all men and 

women: faculty and students. East Campus 

Gymnasium. 
7:30 p.m. Student Union Open Lecture: Israeli— Arab 

Relations. Music Room, East Duke Building. Speaker: 

Mr. Yusuf Khamis. 
8:00 p.m. Basketball: Duke vs. Davidson. Charlotte, North 

Carolina. 



Thursday, February 20 



10:00 a.m. Divinity School Chapel Service. University 

Chapel. Speaker: Mr. Fritz Mahla. Reader: Dr. Stuart 

Henry. 
12:00 noon Newcomer's Club Meeting: Spring Luncheon 

and Fashion Show. Blair House, Chapel Hill Boulevard. 
12:30 p.m. Kappa Delta Pi Luncheon Meeting. East 

Campus Union. Speaker: Dr. Alan Kerckhoff. 
4:00 p.m. Open Lecture: Dr. C.C. Clark. Green Room, 

East Duke Building. 
4:15—5:30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 

faculty, staff members, and students. 
5:00—6:00 p.m. Dean's Hour. Hospital Amphitheater. 

Speaker: Dr. Murray D. Rosenberg. 
5: 15 p.m. Faculty Volleyball. Card Gymnasium. 
8:00 p.m. Student Union Major Speakers Committee: 

Czechoslovakia Seminar. Karl Zener Auditorium, 

Room 130 Psychology— Sociology Building. 
8:00 p.m. Engineering Guest Speaker: Mr. John M. Kyle, 

Jr. Engineering Auditorium, Room 125 Engineering 

Building. 
8:15—9:30 p.m. West Campus Swimming Pool open to 

faculty members and their families. Faculty children 

will be admitted only when accompanied by their 

parents. 
8:15 p.m. Student Union Lecture: "Mysticism." Music 

Room, East Duke Building. Speaker: Professor Joseph 

Campbell. 



Friday, February 21 



Angier B. Duke Weekend. 
10:00 a.m. Divinity School Chapel Service. University 

Chapel. World Day of Prayer. 
12:30 p.m. Plant Ecology Seminar. Room 144 Biological 

Sciences Building. Speaker: Mr. Brian Chabot. 
3:30 p.m. Chemistry Staff Seminar. Room 130 

Psychology— Sociology Building. Speaker: Professor 

Grant W. Urry. 
4:00 p.m. Student Union "Broadway at Duke" Matinee - 

"Man of la Mancha." Page Auditorium. 
4:00 p.m. Anthropology Seminar. Room 12R 

Psychology— Sociology Building. Speaker: Dr. Franklin 

Southworth. 
4:15—5:30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 

faculty, staff members, and students. Faculty 

daughters, ages 6 to 16, may also swim; those 10 and 

under must be accompanied by their mothers. 
7:00—9:00 p.m. Open House Badminton for all men and 

women: faculty and students. East Campus 

Gymnasium. 
8:00 p.m.— 2:00 a.m. CO. Coffee House Program: "Dorian 

Mode." 
8:15 p.m. Student Union "Broadway at Duke" -- "Man of 

la Mancha." Page Auditorium. 



Saturday, February 22 



Angier B. Duke Weekend. 

10:55 a.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Challenges in 
Education." WDNC Durham. Dr. Orrin Pilkey will 
discuss "Black Shells: A Key to the Past." 

3:00—5:00 p.m. East Campus Gymnasium: Open to 
students, faculty, and staff for recreation (swimming, 
badminton, volleyball, basketball, table tennis). 

7:00 and 9:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page Auditorium. 
"ARSENIC AND OLD LACE" with Cary Grant, 
Raymond Massey, Peter Lorre, Josephine Hull and 
Priscilla Lane. "Hilariously funny comedy, about two 
elderly ladies in Brooklyn and their penchant for 
pleasantly poisoning people. Grand fun." — Cue. 

7:30 p.m. Baha'i Fellowship Discussion: 'The Promised 
Day Is Come." Van Sombeek Residence, 1903 Essex 
Road. 



Sunday, February 23 



10:00 a.m. Baha'i Fellowship Discussion: "The Promised 

Day Is Come." Ran Sombeek Residence, 1903 Essex 

Road. 
10:30-10:45 a.m. Carillon Recital. Mr. J. Samuel 

Hammond, University Carillonneur. 
11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship. University 

Chapel. Preacher: The Reverend Dr. Frank Baker, 

Professor of English Church History. Broadcast over 

Radio Station WDNC and WDNC-FM. 
11:25 a.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Challenges in 
' Education." WCHL Chapel Hill. Mr. Joseph Burch will 

discuss "Support for Research Projects." 
4:00 p.m. Installation service for The Reverend Stan Hall 

as Lutheran Chaplain. Duke Memorial Chapel. 
4:00—6:00 p.m. International Open House. 2022 Campus 

Drive. 
7:30 p.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Challenges in 

Education." WPTF Raleigh. Dr. Edgar Thompson will 

discuss "Continuity and Change in the Bible Belt." 
8:15 p.m. Artists Series: The Saint Paul Chamber 

Orchestra. Conductor: Leopold Sipe. Page Auditorium. 

:S NOTICES for the Duke University Calendar should | 

k be submitted IN WRITTEN FORM to Room 207 j: 

:S Flowers Building, not later than 5:00 p.m., Tuesday, | 

g Ext. 2911. 

Published by Duke University Student Activities 
% Department, Box KM, Duke Station, Durham, N.C., | 
x 27706 each week when school is in session. 3 
■■f: Subscriptions: $2.50 per year. Address inquiries to 
S Box KM, Duke Station, Durham, N. C. 27706. 
g Second class postage paid at Durham, N.C. 



UNIVERSITY SERVICE OF WORSHIP 

The Reverend Professor James T. Cleland, Dean of the 
Chapel, will deliver the sermon at the University Service of 
Worship on Sunday, February 16th, at 11:00 a.m. in the 
University Chapel. The sermon topic is "A Parable With a 
Twist." 

ARTS FESTIVAL ON DRAMA 
"OPERA FOR THE NON-BELIEVER" 

As a program for the Arts Festival on Drama, Dr. John 
Clum will present two informal discussions of opera on 
Sunday, February 16th and Sunday, March 2nd, at 2:00 
p.m. in the Music Room. Dr. Clum's first topic, "The 
Timelessness of Tristan," will be a discussion of Wagner's 
"Tristan and Isolde" as the apotheosis of romanticism and 
its affinity with contemporary popular music. Perhaps the 
listener will find that Wagner and the Doors have much in 
common. 

HOOF 'N HORN TRYOUTS 
"HOW TO SUCCEED IN BUSINESS . . ." 

Tryouts for the 1969 Hoof 'n Horn show, "How to 
Succeed in Business Without Really Trying," are announced 
for Monday, February 17th, 1:00-5:00 p.m. and 
7:00-10:00 p.m. and on Tuesday, February 18th, 
2:00—5:00 p.m., to be held in Page Auditorium. Besides 
actors, singers and dancers, there is a need for technical 
workers. Scripts and scores are on reserve in the Woman's 
College Library. 

SOUTHERN ASIA STUDIES 
LECTURE ON INDIAN EDUCATION 

A lecture in the South Asia Public Presentation Series 
will be held on Monday, February 17th, at 4:00 p.m. in 
Room 125 Engineering Building. Dr. Margaret Cormack, 
Director of the South Asia Center at the University of 
California and former director of the U.S. Education 
Foundation in India, will speak on "Dilemma of 
Development— Indian Educational Committee Report." She 
is the author of "She Who Rides a Peacock" and the 
"Hindu Woman." The lecturj is under the auspices of the 
Program in Comparative Studies on Southern Asia. The 
public is cordially invited. 

ZOOLOGY SEMINAR 

The Department of Zoology will hold a seminar on 
Monday, February 17th, at 4:15 p.m. in Room 111 
Biological Sciences Building. Dr. William J. Hamilton III, 
Associate Professor of Zoology, University of California at 
Davis, will speak on "South Africa's Black and White Beetle 
Problem." Dr. Hamilton is currently writing a book on the 
ecology of color in animals. Last year he studied black and 
white beetles in the Sahara and Kalahari deserts, zebra 
stripes on the Serengeti Plains, and coral fish in the Indian 
Ocean. He will discuss the role of color in a thermal 
adaptation for desert existence in African beetles. Coffee 
and tea will be served at 4:00 p.m. 

DUKE LAW FORUM 

The Duke Law Forum will sponsor an address by Mr. 
Harold Glassen, President of the National Rifle Association, 



in the Law School Courtroom on Tuesday, February 18th, 
at 10:00 a.m. The topic of his talk will be "Gun Control 
Legislation: the Opposing Equities." 



BUSINESS DIVISION SEMINAR 

The Physical Planning Department will conduct a 
seminar in the Medical Center Auditorium on Tuesday, 
February 18th, at 2:00 p.m. Mr. James Ward, Director of 
Physical Planning and Mr. William A. Bowden, Associate 
Architect, will tell of the services provided by their 
Department and discuss the University's building program. 
Color slides and maps will be used to illustrate matters of 
interest. This should be an informative and interesting 
presentation. 

DUKE DRAMA FESTIVAL 
KENNETH OLSEN SEMINAR 

The Student Union's Arts Festival Committee is 
coordinating the more than thirteen dramatic presentations 
being given on the Duke Campus during the next six weeks 
into a Festival of Drama. Besides the wide variety of plays, 
films, and operas being presented, a number of speakers 
have been invited to discuss the contemporary dramatic 
scene. 

The initial speaker is Kenneth M. Olsen, General 
Manager and Vice President of American Theatre 
Productions, Inc., a recognized authority on regional 
subscription theater. Mr. Olsen will speak on "The Public 
Ear and the Private Purse" on Tuesday, February 18th, at 
7:00 p.m. in Room 208 Flowers Building. This discussion is 
open to the public without charge. 

Brochures describing the entire festival are available at 
the Flowers Information Desk. 

TOCQUEVILLE SOCIETY MEETING 

"The Meaning of a Liberal Education" will be the topic 
of discussion for the first meeting of the semester, for the 
Tocqueville Society, at 7:00 p.m. on Tuesday, February 
18th, in Room 101 Union Building. The groundwork for 
the discussion will be given by a taped discussion of the 
topic by Professors Bill Campbell, Professor of Economics 
at L.S.U.; Gerhart Niemeyer, Professor of Political Science 
at Notre Dame; Peter Stanlis, Director of the Edmund 
Burke Society of America; and Stephen Tensor, Professor 
of Intellectual History at the University of Michigan. Those 
wishing additional reading material on the general topic 
area may receive a copy of the essay "Academic Freedom: 
Principles and Problems," by Richard Weaver, former 
Professor of English at the University of Chicago, by 
contacting Ken Kuehnle, extension 3614. The Tocqueville 
Society is an educational association formed last year as a 
forum for the expression and examination of conservative 
philosophy. 

SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING 

There will be an Open House and Demonstration 
Tuesday evening, February 18th, at 7:30 p.m. in the 
Presbyterian Student Center on Alexander Avenue. A 
demonstration Team in Scottish dress will perform and 
there will be dancing for all! Refreshments will be served 
and everyone is welcome. For further information call Dr. 
R. Connett, extension 5465. 



S.U. MAJOR SPEAKERS LAST LECTURE 
DR. THOMAS McCOLLOUGH 

"The Non-hero as an Ethical Model" will be the topic of 
Dr. Thomas McCollough's Last Lecture sponsored by the 
Student Union Major Speakers Committee. The lecture will 
be presented at 8: 15 p.m. in the Music Room, East Duke 
Building, on Tuesday, February 18th. 

Dr. McCo Hough is well-known at Duke for his 
outstanding course in Christian Ethics. He received his B.A. 
from the University of Texas and his B.D. and Th.D. 
degrees from Southern Baptist Theological Seminar. He has 
also studied at the University of Basel and the University of 
Zurich. He was ordained at the First Baptist Church in Las 
Cruces, New Mexico, in 1948, and served as pastor of a 
church in Kentucky. 

Dr. McCollough came to Duke in 1961 from the Baptist 
Theological Seminary in Switzerland. He is supervisor of 
freshman instruction in religion and holds an associate 
professorship. He is the author of many articles on theology 
and was the recepient of the 1967—68 fellowship award by 
the Society for Religion in Higher Education. A native of 
Birmingham, Alabama, Dr. McCollough is married and has 
two children. 

S.U. OPEN LECTURE 
ISRAELI-ARAB RELATIONS 

Israeli-Arab relations will be the topic of a speech by Mr. 
Yusuf Khamis, presented in the Music Room, East Duke 
Building, on Wednesday, February 19th, at 7:30 p.m. The 
lecture is co-sponsored by the Student Union Educative 
Involvement and Major Speaker Committees. 

Born in Nazareth in 1919 of a prominent Christian Arab 
family and educated at American University in Beirut, 
Lebanon, Mr. Khamis has worked primarily for the welfare 
and progress of the Israeli Arabs. He served in the Israel 
Parliament (Knesset) from 1955 to 1966, and was active in 
the Haifa Municipal Council. As a member of the Executive 
Committee of the Histadrut, Israel's Federation of Labor, 
Mr. Khamis headed the pensions and social welfare 
programs in the Department of Arab Affairs and was 
responsible for extending welfare programs to Jerusalem's 
new Arab population. He is currently engaged in bringing 
social welfare and labor programs to the West Bank 
population. 

Mr. Khamis has traveled extensively in the Middle East 
and throughout the world, participating in many 
international conferences on peace, the United Nations, and 
labor problems. His last lecture tour to the United States 
was in April, 1967. 

KAPPA DELTA PI LUNCHEON MEETING 

Kappa Delta Pi, Education Honorary, will hold its 
monthly meeting on Thursday, February 20th, at 12:30 
p.m. in the East Campus Union. Dr. Alan Kerckhoff of the 
Sociology Department will speak on "The Teacher's Role as 
Socializing Agent." 

OPEN LECTURE 
DR. C.C. CLARK 

Dr. C. C. Clark, formerly professor of English Literature 
at Bryn Mawr College, will deliver a lecture on "The 
Influence of the 'Bhagavad-Gita' on American Writers" on 
Thursday, February 20th, at 4:00 p.m. in the Green Room, 



East Duke Building. Dr. Clark was instrumental in 
establishing the Center for the Study of World Religions at 
Harvard, and continues to serve as the representative of the 
trust which made the endowment. This lecture is 
co-sponsored by the Department of Religion and the 
Committee on Comparative Studies on South Asia. 

DEAN'S HOUR 

The Dean's Hour will be held on Thursday. February 
20th, from 5:00 to 6:00 p.m. in the Hospital 
Amphitheater. Dr. Murray D. Rosenberg, Department of 
Genetics and Cell Biology, University of Minnesota. St. 
Paul, Minnesota, will speak on "Cell Membranes and 
Disease." 

S.U. MAJOR SPEAKER 
CZECHOSLOVAKIAN SEMINAR 

The Student Union Major Speakers Committee is 
sponsoring a faculty seminar on the recent political events 
in Czechoslovakia. Participants will include Dr. Vladimir 
Treml, Department of Economics; Dr. Kazimierz 
Grzybowski, World Rule of Law Center; and Dr. Joseph 
Anderli, UNC, Department of History. The moderator will 
be Dr. Thomas Rainey of the Department of History. Each 
panelist will present an analysis of the crisis from his 
academic viewpoint. Afterwards, the floor will be open for 
discussion. The seminar will be held on Thursday, February 
20th, at 8:00 p.m. in the Karl Zener Auditorium, Room 
130 Psychology— Sociology Building. All students and 
faculty are invited to attend. 

ENGINEERING GUEST SPEAKER 

The School of Engineering and the Professional 
Engineers of North Carolina are observing National 
Engineers Week with a guest speaker on Thursday, 
February 20th, at 8:00 p.m. in the Engineering 
Auditorium, Room 125 Engineering Building. Mr. John M. 
Kyle, Jr., P.E., Member of the National Academy of 
Engineering and Chief Engineer of the Port of New York 
Authority will speak on "New Facilities for World Trade 
Center." 

STUDENT UNION LECTURE 
"MYSTICISM" 

Professor Joseph Campbell, Department of Religion at 
Sarah Lawrence College, Bronxville, New York, will speak 
at an open seminar on "Mysticism" in the Music Room, 
East Duke Building, on Thursday, February 20th, at 8:15 
p.m. The Student Union's Special Projects Committee, 
sponsoring group for the session, extends a cordial 
invitation to all members of the community to hear this 
renowned authority on mythology and mysticism. 

Author of "Hero with a Thousand Faces," Professor 
Campbell is a leading authority on Joyce and editor of 
works by C.C. Jung, Heinrich Zinner, and Mircea Eliade. 



PLANT ECOLOGY SEMINAR 

Mr. Brian Chabot, graduate student in Botany, will 
present a seminar on "Ecotype Development on a 
Temperature Gradient in the Sierra Nevada, California" at 
the Plant Ecology Seminar on Friday, February 21st, at 
12:30 p.m. in Room 144 Biological Sciences Building. 






ANGIER B.DUKE 
SCHOLARSHIP WEEKEND 

Some seventy-two finalists for Duke University's most 
prestigious scholarships will assemble on the campus 
Thursday— Friday, February 20th-21st, for a final round of 
interviews. 

Angier B. Duke Scholarship candidates from throughout 
the United States have been invited to the university for 
two days of entertainment and interview sessions. 
Receptions, dinners and a Broadway production are 
included on the schedule. 

The scholarships are worth up to $14,200 for four years 
of study at Duke. The amount given to the individual 
recipient is determined by financial need. As a result of 
recent innovations in the program, regional restrictions have 
been removed. This year the finalists represent every 
section of the nation. A continuing on-campus program also 
has been added for the A.B. Duke scholars. 

Scholarships will be awarded to at least thirty-four 
members of the 1969 freshmen class. The program also has 
been expanded to consider deserving students already 
enrolled in the university for awards. 

CHEMISTRY STAFF SEMINAR 

Professor Grant W. Urry, Chairman, Department of 
Chemistry, Tufts University, will speak at the Chemistry 
Staff Seminar on Friday, February 21st, in Room 130 
Psychology— Sociology Building. The subject of Professor 
Urry's address will be "A Stable Neutral Ammonium 
Radical of D 2d Symmetry." All interested persons are 
cordially invited to attend. 

BROADWAY AT DUKE 
"MAN OF LA MANCHA" 

"Man of La Mancha," currently in its third year on 
Broadway and headed for two performances at Page 
Auditorium on Friday, February 21st, is the only successful 
translation of Don Quixote from the printed page to the 
living stage. Though the novel is one of the most 
entertaining classics of all time, the history of the theatre is 
filled with playwrights who foundered until Dale 
Wasserman had the brilliant audacity to combine both the 
story and the author's (Cervantes) own life. 

Presented on Friday, February 21st, as the final 
performance in this years' "Broadway at Duke" Series, the 
Student Union's Drama Committee has arranged for a 4:00 
p.m. matinee on the same day as the evening performance 
to accomodate the great demand for tickets. The evening 
performance is now a complete sell-out but good tickets are 
available in Page Box Office (telephone 684-4059) for the 
matinee, priced at $5.25, 4.50, and 4.00. 

The prize winning musical hit stars David Atkinson and 
Patricia Marand as Don Quixote and Aldonza, both of 
whom played the leading roles on Broadway. Heading the 
supporting east is Louis Criscuolo as Sancho, Seymour 
Penzner as the Innkeeper, Ponn Carroll as the Padre and 
including Mark Ross, Marise Counsell, Lynn Carroll, 
Norman Riggins and Edmund Varrato. 

"Man of La Mancha" is the only musical in history 
played successfully without an intermission for the authors 
felt it would break the mood of the play. The music is so 
integral a part of the production that the show also carries 
its own complete orchestra of ten men. Song hits from the 
show include "The Impossible Dream," "Little Bird, Little 
Bird," "Dulcinea," "I'm Only Thinking of Him" and the 
title song "Man of La Mancha." 



ANTHROPOLOGY SEMINAR 

Dr. Franklin Southworth, University of Pennsylvania, 
will lecture on "A Case of Creolization and Some 
Sociological Implications," at an Anthropology Seminar 
which will be held at 4:00 p.m. on Friday, February 21st, 
in Room 126 Psychology— Sociology Building. 



CO. COFFEE HOUSE 
"DORIAN MODE" 

Appearing in the Celestial Omnibus Coffeehouse on 
Friday, February 21st, from 8:00 p.m. until 2:00 a.m., 
Duke's own rock and blues group, "Dorian Mode," 
featuring Walt Turyn on rhythm guitar, Winslow Stillman 
playing lead, Steve Kenna on bass, Jason Warren on organ, 
and Phil Hanlin on the drums. 



LUTKERAN STUDENT FOUNDATION 
INSTALLATION SERVICE 

The Lutheran Student Foundation of Durham cordially 
invites the Duke University community to the installation 
service for The Reverend Stan Hall, Lutheran chaplain, at 
4:00 p.m. on Sunday, February 23rd, in Duke Memorial 
Chapel. 

DUKE ARTISTS SERIES 
SAINT PAUL CHAMBER ORCHESTRA 

The Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra with L. Sipe 
conducting will be heard as the initial Duke Artists Series 
performance in Page Auditorium on Sunday, February 23rd 
at 8:15 p.m. Individual tickets, priced at $3.25, 2.75, and 
2.25, are now available in Page Box Office. 

The Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra and its conductor 
Leopold Sipe are a modern ensemble molded from the great 
tradition of assembled virtuosi playing as one, but with a 
spirit of excitement and youthful vigor to make every 
concert experience a challenge. The orchestra of 
twenty-two members includes strings, woodwinds, and a 
harpsichord. Its players have been selected from Europe 
and America for a new kind of combined musicianship. 

The program follows: 

I. Suite in F Telemann 

Lento - Allegro - Lento 
Rondo: Moderato 
Sarabande: Lento 
Menuet: Moderato 
Bouree: Presto 

II. Symphony in B Flat, No. 5 Schubert 

Allegro 

Andante con moto 
Menuet: Allegro molto 
Allegro vivace 

III. Royal Invitation Argento 

Allegro 

Mardh, Polonaise, Presto spiritoso 

Maestoso and Fox-trot 

Allegretto, Allegro barbaro, Maestoso 

Allegro non troppo 

IV. Symphony in G, No. 88 Haydn 

Adagio - Allegro (Sieber print) 

Largo 

Menuet: Allegretto 
Allegro con spirito 
N.B. Patrons: please note change in program. 



CHAPEL CHOIR AUDITIONS 

Auditions for the Duke Chapel Choir are now being held 
for the Spring Semester. Membership is open to students, 
faculty, and townspeople. Highlights of the spring will be 
performances of movements of the Brahms "Requiem" for 
Easter Sunday and the performance of "King David" by 
Arthur Honegger for the Spring Oratorio. Please call 
684-3898 by Wednesday, February 19th, for an audition 
appointment. 

UNIVERSITY FACULTY MEETING 

The University Faculty will meet on Thursday, February 
27th, at 3:30 p.m. in the Engineering Auditorium. 

WEINSTEIN MEMORIAL LECTURE 
DR.YOCHANAN MUFFS 

The B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation at the University of 
North Carolina and Duke University extends a cordial 
invitation to the entire community to attend the «>xth 
annual Rosa B. Weinstein Memorial Lectures on Religion to 
be held on February 23rd, 24th, and 25th. The guest 
lecturer, Dr. Yochanan Muffs, Professor of Biblical Studies, 
Jewish Theological Seminar of America, will speak on the 
subject, "The Humanity of God: Varieties of Religious 
Experience in Ancient Israel" and "The Psychology of 
Prophetic Consciousness." The first topic will be discusseat 
the U.N.C. Hillel House, 210 West Cameron Avenue, at 
8:00 p.m. on Monday, February 24th and the second topic 
on Tuesday, February 25th at 8:30 p.m. at Duke, Room 
208 Flowers Building, West Campus. 

Established by Maurice A. Weinstein of Charlotte, the 
Lectures provide an opportunity to bring noted faculty and 
scholars in the field of religion from other institutions to 
the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and 
Greensboro and to Duke University. 

A graduate of the Rabbinical school of the Jewish 
Theological Seminar of America, a Ph.D. in Oriental Studies 
at the University of Pennsylvania and a fellow of the 
Society for Religion in Higher Education (Kent-Danforth). 
He has taught at Columbia and New York Universities and 
has lecturer widely throughout the country. At present. Dr. 
Muffs is working on a study of biblical anthropomorphism 
— the personality of God — under a grant from the 
American Council of Learned Societies. 

CANADIAN STUDIES FELLOWSHIP 

The Canadian Centennial Fund of New York offers a 
Canadian Studies Graduate fellowship for study in a 
Canadian Graduate School in the social sciences or 
humanities. Applicants must be United States Citizens, 
must be seniors or recent graduates and under thirty years 
of age. The Fellowship will pay $2480.00 in U.S. funds and 
will be tenable at any Canadian university where the 
candidate has been accepted for graduate studies. Some 
universities will supplement the fellowships by remission of 
tuition fees. Applications myst be submitted before March 
1st. Students seeking further information should contact 
Professor Richard Preston, Room 237 Social Science 
Building, Extension 5408, immediately. 

NEW LIBRARY LOCATIONS 

The following offices and departments of the Perkins 
Library have moved into the new Library building: 



Technical Services, Gertrude Merritt, Head, Room 117 
(main floor), telephone 3675. 

Circulation Department, Elvin Strowd, Head, Room 
115F (main floor), telephone 2947. 

Reference Department, Florence Blakely, Head (main 
floor), telephone 2373. 

Current periodicals, main floor to the right of the 
Reference Department, telephone 3730. 

The Flowers Collection, Winston Broadfoot, Director, 
Basement, Room 022, telephone 3160. 

Documents, Wilhelmina Lemen, Head, Basement, Room 
025, telephone 2380. 

Newspapers and Microtext materials, Edwin Hix, Head, 
Basement, Room 015, telephone 3978. 

Photographic Services, Basement, Room 013, telephone 
5075. (Charles Tucker is now in charge of Photographic 
Services, which formerly was a part of Newspapers and 
Microtext). 

Undergraduate and Graduate reserve collections will be 
moved this week to the Reference Room of the old 
building, Room 208, where they will remain during the 
current year. The Graduate Reading Room in the new 
building will be opened this week and will be used as a 
general reading room this year. 



SUMMER 1969 
EUROPEAN GROUP FLIGHTS 

For the eighth consecutive year, the Student Activities 
Office, 202-A Flowers Building, is offering Duke European 
Group Fare Flights to members of the Duke University 
Community (faculty, staff, students, and employees). The 
Activities Office will provide tickets only for economy class 
jet air transportation. All other arrangements are the 
responsibility of the individual. 

All faculty, staff, students, and employees of Duke 
University are eligible who have been associated with Duke 
for six months prior to departure times. 

Dates . . . 

Flight 1 (Wash.) Pan Am June 9 (Paris) Pan Am Aug. 26 
Flight 2 (NYC) Air India June 9 (Lon.) Air India Aug. 28 
Flight 3 (NYC) Air India June 10 (Lon.) Air India July 14 
Flight 4 (NYC) Pan Am July 23 (Lon.) Pan Am Aup ? 7 
Application forms are available at the Flowers Information 
Desk and Room 207 Flowers Building. 



SPECIAL UNIVERSITY ANNOUNCEMENTS 

The following announcement appeared in the 
CALENDAR published January 24, 1969, and is being 
repeated for those who might have missed seeing it the first 
time: "The Faculty Health Clinic, which is designed to 
provide medical care for faculty members and adult 
members of their families, is now open from 8:30 to 10:30 
a.m. Monday through Friday. No appointment is necessary. 
The clinic is located in the PDC Annex in the rear of the 
Statler-Hilton Hotel. Parking space is available just outside 
the entrance. For further information, call Duke Extension 
6448 or visit the clinic in person." 



Duke University 



CALENDAR 




Volume 69 



Published Feb. 21,1969 



Feb. 23-Mar. 2, 1969 

Number S 



Sunday, February 23 



Fellowship Discussion: "The Promised 
' Van Sombeek Residence, 1903 Essex 



10:00 a.m. Baha'i 

Day Is Come. 

Road. 
10:30-10:45 a.m. Carillon Recital. Mr. J. Samuel 

Hammond, University Carillonneur. 
11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship. University 

Chapel. Preacher: The Reverend Dr. Frank Baker, 

Professor of English Church History. Sermon: "Forty 

Days and Forty Nights." Broadcast over Radio Station 

WDNC 
11:25 a.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Challenges in 

Education." WCHL Chapel Hill. Mr. Joseph Burch will 

discuss "Support for Research Projects." 
4:00 p.m. Installation service for The Reverend Stan Hall 

as Lutheran Chaplain. Duke Memorial Chapel. 
4:00—6:00 p.m. International Open House. 2022 Campus 

Drive. 
7:30 p.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Challenges in 

Education." WPTF Raleigh. Dr. Edgar Thompson will 

discuss "Continuity and Change in the Bible Belt." 
8:15 p.m. Artists Series: The Saint Paul Chamber 

Orchestra. Conductor: Leopold Sipe. Page Auditorium. 

Monday, February 24 

4:15 p.m. Zoology Seminar. Room 111 Biological Sciences 
Building. Speaker: Dr. Lawrence Grossman. 

4:15—5:30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. 

5:15 p.m. Faculty Volleyball. Card Gymnasium. 

7:00 p.m. International Folk Dancing. The Ark, East 
Campus. 

8:15 p.m. Student Union Major Speakers Lecture: Dr. J.B. 
Rhine. Baldwin Auditorium. 

8:15 p.m. West Campus Swimming Pool open to faculty 
members and their families. Faculty children will be 
admitted only when accompanied by their parents. 

Tuesday, February 25 

10:00 a.m. Divinity School Chapel Service. University 

Chapel. Speaker: Dr. C.C. Clark of New York City. 
4:15—5:30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 

faculty, staff members, and students. 
7:00-10:00 p.m. Arts and Crafts Workshop in 

Two-Dimensional Media. Room 108 Art Building, East 

Campus. 



7:30—10:00 p.m. Scottish Country Dancing. Presbyterian 

Student Center. 
8:30 p.m. Weinstein Memorial Lecture: Dr. Yochanan 

Muffs. Room 208 Flowers Building. 

Wednesday, February 26 

10:00 a.m. Divinity School Chapel Service. University 

Chapel. Speaker: Dr. C.C. Clark of New York City. 
2:00 p.m. Divinity School Lecture. Moot Courtroom, Law 

School. Speaker: Professor Jurgen Moltmann. 
4:00 p.m. Joint Colloquium: Departments of Psychology, 

Physiology, and Biochemistry. Room 385 Medical 

Sciences I Building. Speaker: Dr. Ian Whitfield. 
4:15—5:30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 

faculty, staff members, and students. 
6:25—8:00 p.m. Chapel Choir Rehearsal. University 

Chapel. 
7:00 p.m. Student Union Pre-Artists Series Seminar — 

"Carmen." Room 208 Flowers Building. Speaker: Mrs. 

Eugenia Saville. 
7:00—9:00 p.m. Open House Badminton for all men and 

women: faculty and students. East Campus 

Gymnasium. 
8:00 p.m. Basketball: Duke vs. North Carolina State 

University. Raleigh, North Carolina. 
8:15 p.m. Artists Series: Goldovsky Grand Opera Theater 

— "Carmen." Page Auditorium. 



Thursday, February 27 



10:00 a.m. Divinity School Chapel Service. University 

Chapel. Speaker: Dr. C.C. Clark of New York City. 
3:30 p.m. University Faculty Meeting. Engineering 

Auditorium. 
4:00 p.m. Academic 

Auditorium. 
5:00-6:00 p.m. Dean's 

Speaker: Dr. Chauncey D. Leake 
5:15 p.m. Faculty Volleyball. Card Gymnasium. 
7:00-10:00 p.m. Arts and Crafts Workshop in 

Two-Dimensional Media. Room 108 Art Building, East 

Campus. 
7:15 p.m. North Carolina Poetry Circuit: Ronald Bates. 

Green Room, East Duke Building. 
8:00 p.m. Fritz London Memorial Lecture. Auditorium, 

Biological Sciences Building. Speaker: Dr. Eugene 

Wigner. 



Council Meeting. Engineering 
Hour. Hospital Amphitheater. 



8:15—9:30 p.m. West Campus Swimming Pool open to 
faculty members and their families. Faculty children 
will be admitted only when accompanied by their 
parents. 

8:15 p.m. Student Union Educative Involvement 
Symposium: "Comics as a Reflection of Contemporary 
Culture." Music Room, East Duke Building. Speakers: 
Stan Lee and Robert Lawrence. 

Friday, February 28 

10:00 a.m. Divinity School Chapel Service. University 
Chapel. Speaker: Dr. C.C. Clark of New York City. 

11:00 a.m. Student Union Educative Involvement 
Symposium: "Comics as a Reflection of Contemporary 
Culture." Room 101 Union Building. Speaker: Mr. 
Stan Lee. 

12:30 p.m. Plant Ecology Seminar. Room 144 Biological 
Sciences Building. Speaker: Mr. David Patterson. 

1:00 p.m. Student Union Educative Involvement 
Symposium: "Comics as a Reflection of Contemporary 
Culture." Room 130 Psychology— Sociology Building. 
Speaker: Mr. Robert Lawrence. 

3:30 p.m. Chemistry Staff Seminar. Room 130 
Psychology— Sociology Building. Speaker: Professor 
Phillip H. Geil. 

7:00—9:00 p.m. Open House Badminton for all men and 
women: faculty and students. East Campus 
Gymnasium. 

8:00 p.m. Annual Nereidian Water Show: "Water 
Wonderland." Woman's College Gymnasium. 

8:00 p.m. Freshman Basketball: Duke vs. University of 
North Carolina. Indoor Stadium. 

8:00 p.m. Student Union Cinematic Arts Committee Film 
Series: "LA VIE A L'ENVERS" ("Life Upside 
Down"). This film, the first by Frenchman Alain 
Jessus, is the story of the gradual mental deterioration 
of a seemingly normal man. "It is a work executed 
without flaw -- spellbinding, and insidiously, it almost 
makes us chuckle with the near-appeal of its central 
terror." "SENSELESS" directed by Ron Rice. 
"Consisting of a poetic stream of razor-sharp images, 
the overt content portrays ecstatic travelers going to 
pot over the pleasures of a trip to Mexico." 
Auditorium, Biological Sciences Building. 

8:15 p.m. Alpha-Omega Players Present "Spoon River 
Anthology." 

Saturday, March 1 

10:55 a.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Challenges in 
Education." WDNC Durham. Mr. Joseph Burch will 
discuss "Support for Research Projects." 

2:00 p.m. Basketball: Duke vs. University of North 
Carolina. Indoor Stadium, (televised). 

7:00 p.m. Student Union Major Attraction: Janis Joplin 
and The James Cotton Blues Band. Indoor Stadium. 

7:00 and 9:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page Auditorium. 
"THE PARTY" with Peter Sellers and Claudine 
Longet. "Directed by Biake Edwards, a man who has 
an understandable affection for the old comic forms 
and who directed Mr. Sellers so successfully in 'A Shot 
in the Dark' and 'The Pink Panther.' The idea is . . . 
how a good-natured . . . Mr. Sellers cast as a woefully 



stupid actor from India turns a stuffily posh 
Hollywood dinner party into a shambles of broken 
dishware and plumbing and shattered egos." Vincent 
Canaby, N.Y. Times. 

Sunday, March 2 



10:30-10:45 a.m. Carillon Recital. Mr. J. Samuel 

Hammond, University Carillonneur. 
11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship. University 

Chapel. Preacher: The Reverend Dr. Howard C. 

Wilkinson, Chaplain to the University. Broadcast over 

Radio Station WDNC. 
11:25 a.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Challenges in 

Education." WCHL Chapel Hill. Mr. Paul Fendt will 

discuss "Employee Training and Development." 
4:00 p.m. Annual Nereidian Water Show: "Water 

Wonderland." Woman's College Gymnasium. 
4:00—6:00 p.m. International Open House. 2022 Campus 

Drive. 
7:00 and 9:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page Auditorium. 

"THE PARTY." 
7:30 p.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Challenges in 

Education." WPTF Raleigh. Dr. Orrin Pilkey will 

discuss "Black Shells: A Key to the Past." 
8:15 p.m. Senior Recital: D. Kern Holoman, Bassoon. 

Music Room, East Duke Building. 



NOTICES for the Duke University Calendar 
should be submitted IN WRITTEN FORM to Room 
207 Flowers Building, not later than 5:00 p.m., 
Tuesday, Ext. 2911. 

Published by Duke University Student Activities 
Department, Box KM, Duke Station, Durham, N. C, 
27706 each week when school if in session. 
Subscriptions: $2.50 per year. Address inquiries to 
Box KM, Duke Station, Durham, N.C. 27706. Second 
class postage paid at Durham, N.C. 



UNIVERSITY SERVICE OF WORSHIP 

The Reverend Dr. Frank Baker, Professor of English 
Church History, will deliver the sermon at the University 
Service of Worship on Sunday, February 23rd, at 11:00 
a.m. in the University Chapel. The sermon topic is "Forty 
Days and Forty Nights." 






LUTHERAN STUDENT FOUNDATION 
INSTALLATION SERVICE 

The Lutheran Student Foundation of Durham cordially 
invites the Duke University Community to the installation 
service for The Reverend Stan Hall, Lutheran Chaplain, at 
4:00 p.m. on Sunday, February 23rd, in Duke Memorial 
Chapel. 






DUKE ARTISTS SERIES 
SAINT PAUL CHAMBER ORCHESTRA 

The Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra with Leopold Sipe 
conducting will be heard as the initial Duke Artists Series 
performance in Page Auditorium on Sunday, February 
23rd, at 8:15 p.m. Individual tickets, priced at $3.25, 2.75, 
and 2.25, are now available in Page Box Office. 

The Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra and its conductor 
Leopold Sipe are a modern ensemble molded from the great 
tradition of assembled virtuosi playing as one, but with a 
spirit of excitement and youthful vigor to make every 
concert experience a challenge. The orchestra of 
twenty-two members includes strings, woodwinds, and a 
harpsichord. Its players have been selected from Europe 
and America for a new kind of combined musicianship. 

The program follows: 

Suite in F Telemann 

Lento - Allegro • Lento 

Rondo: Moderato 

Saraband e: Lento 

Menuet: Moderato 

Bouree : Presto 
Symphony in B Flat, No. 5 Schubert 

Allegro 

Andante con moto 

Menuet: Allegro motto 

Allegro vivace 
Royal Invitation Argento 

Allegro 

March, Polonaise, Presto spiritoso 

Maestoso and Fox-trot 

Allegretto, Allegro barbaro, Maestoso 

Allegro non troppo 
Symphony in G, No. 88 Haydn 

Adagio - Allegro 

Largo 

Menuet: Allegretto 

Allegro con spirito 
N.B. Patrons: please note change in program 

ZOOLOGY SEMINAR 

The Department of Zoology will hold a seminar on 
Monday, February 24th, at 4:15 p.m. in Room 111 
Biological Sciences Building. Dr. Lawrence Grossman, 
Professor of Biochemistry, Brandeis University, will speak 
on "Enzymes Involved in the Early States of Repair of 
Ultraviolet Irradiated DNA." A refreshment period will 
precede the meeting at 4:00 p.m. 

Dr. Grossman has been studying the mechanism of 
mutation for some years and has now turned his attention 
to the way in which ultraviolet damage to the genetic 
material is repaired by the cell. The enzymes he is studying 
are not only of importance in the repair of ultraviolet 
damage but may have significance in the process of genetic 
recombination. 

S.U. MAJOR SPEAKERS SEMINAR 
DR. J.B. RHINE 

On Monday, February 24th, at 8:15 p.m. in Baldwin 
Auditorium, the Student Union Major Speakers Committee 
will present Dr. J.B. Rhine, Director of the Institute of 
Parapsychology. He will speak on early research and recent 
findings in his field. The public is cordially invited. Dr. 



Rhine is known nationally and internationally for his 
exciting work in parapsychology. Born in Juniata County, 
Pennsylvania, Dr. Rhine attended Ohio Northern University 
and the College of Wooster, and received his Ph.D. from the 
University of Chicago. 

From the field of plant physiology, Dr. Rhine and his 
wife Louisa E. Rhine, moved into explorations in the field 
of parapsychology. After a year at Harvard, Dr. Rhine came 
to Duke in 1927 where he began work under Professor 
William McDougall. While at Duke, Dr. Rhine wrote a book 
in which he coined the phrase "extrasensory perception" 
and he began the 'Journal of Parapsychology" in 1937. 
Since then, Dr. Rhine has written a number of books on 
parapsychology, the most recent of which is 
"Parapsychology Today." Dr. Rhine has established the 
Foundation for Research on the Nature of Man (FRNM) 
and is director of the Institute of Parapsychology. 

ARTS AND CRAFTS WORKSHOP 

The spring semester Arts and Crafts Workshop will offer 
instruction and practice in two-dimensional media. The 
Workshop will provide live models and/ or still-life setups. 
The subject matter for each workshop will.be a common 
theme but the student may work in the media of his 
choice: pen, pencil, charcoal, watercolor, acrylics, et cetera. 

The workshop, sponsored by the Mary Duke Biddle 
Foundation, will be held in Room 108 Art Building, East 
Campus from 7:00 to 10:00 p.m. on Tuesday and Thursday 
evenings beginning February 25th and lasting through April 
24th. Formal instruction periods and critiques will be given 
from 7:00 to 8:00 p.m. on Tuesdays. Any member of the 
Duke University Community is encouraged to attend, 
whether they be a beginner or an advanced student. 

WEINSTEIN MEMORIAL LECTURE 
DR. YOCHANAN MUFFS 

A reminder is made to the University Community of the 
final lecture in the sixth annual Rosa B. Weinstein Memorial 
Lectures on Religion. The guest lecturer, Dr. Yochanan 
Muffs. Professor of Biblical Studies, Jewish Theological 
Seminary of America, will speak on the subject, "The 
Psychology of Prophetic Consciousness" at 8:30 p.m. on 
Tuesday, February 25th in Room 208 Flowers Building. 

DIVINITY SCHOOL LECTURE 
PROFESSOR JURGEN MOLTMANN 

A lecture, sponsored by The Divinity School, will be 
delivered on Wednesday, February 26th, at 2:00 p.m. in the 
Moot Court Room, Law Building. Professor Jurgen 
Moltmann, Professor of Systematic Theology at the 
University of Tubingen, will deliver the lecture. 

The public is cordially invited to attend this lecture. 

JOINT DEPARTMENTAL COLLOQUIUM 

A colloquium, sponsored jointly by the Departments of 
Psychology, Physiology, and Biochemistry, will be held in 
Room 385 Medical Sciences I Building, on Wednesday, 
February 26th, at 4:00 p.m. Dr. Ian Whitfield, Visiting 
Professor of Psychology and Director of the 
Neurocommunications Unit at the University of 
Birmingham, England will speak. The title of his talk will be 
"Cochlear Potentials and the Cochlear Transducer." 



S.U. PRE-ARTIST SERIES 

"CARMEN" SEMINAR 
WITH EUGENIA SAVILLE 

Following the practice of many years, the Student 
Union Performing Arts Committee will present a 
pre-concert seminar in conjunction with the Duke Artists 
Series presentation of "Carmen." Mrs. Eugenia Saville, 
Associate Professor in the Department of Music in which 
she is presently Director of Undergraduate Studies, is also 
Director of the Duke Madrigal Singers. She will lead the 
seminar which will deal with opera as an art form and the 
methods of presentations made by Boris Goldovsky. 

The seminar will be held at 7:00 p.m. in Room 208 
Flowers Building immediately prior to the performance on 
Wednesday, February 26th. The public is cordially invited 
to this helpful session. 



DUKE ARTISTS SERIES 
"CARMEN" 

The second performance of the Duke Artists Series will 
be a presentation of Bizet's "Carmen" by the Goldovsky 
Grand Opera Theater on Wednesday, February 26th, at 
8:15 p.m. in Page Auditorium. Single tickets, priced at 
$3.25, $2.75, $2.25 are available in the Page Box Office. 

The performance will be presented in English by a 
company of seventy under the artistic direction of Boris 
Goldovsky. This year's tour of the Goldovsky Grand Opera 
Theater marks the twenty-second year for this phenomenal 
group of vital young talent and the fourteenth 
cross-country tour. Their impressive record lists over 700 
performances of eight different operas in forty-eight states. 



UNIVERSITY FACULTY MEETING 

The University Faculty will meet on Thursday, February 
27th, at 3:30 p.m. in the Engineering Auditorium. 



ACADEMIC COUNCIL MEETING 

The Academic Council will meet on Thursday, February 
27th, at 4:00 p.m. in the Engineering Auditorium following 
the meeting of the University Faculty. 



DEAN'S HOUR 

The Dean's Hour will be held on Thursday, February 
27th, from 5:00 to 6:00 p.m. in the Hospital 
Amphitheater. Dr. Chauncey D. Leake, Department of 
Pharmacology, University of California, San Francisco 
Medical Center, will present the Trent Lecture. The topic of 
his presentation will be "Theories of Ethics in Relation to 
Medical Practice." 



N.C. POETRY CIRCUIT 
RONALD BATES 

The Student Union Performing Arts Committee and the 
English Department, in conjunction with the North 
Carolina Poetry Circuit, will present Roland Bates, 
Canadian poet, in a reading of his poetry on Thursday, 
February 27th at 7:15 p.m. in the Green Room, East Duke 



Building. The program is open to the public without charge. 
A native of Saskatchewan, Canada, Ronald Bates holds 
the B.A., M.A., and Ph.D. degree from the University of 
Toronto. A former associate professor of English in the 
University of Western Ontario, London, Canada, Mr. Bates 
has published articles in The Shakespeare Quarterly, The 
James Joyce Quarterly, Wisconsin Studies in Comparative 
Literature and other scholarly journals. He has published 
poems in numerous journals, including The Times Literary 
Supplement and three volumes of poetry: The Wandering 
World, The Unimaginable Circus and Changes. 



FRITZ LONDON MEMORIAL LECTURE 

Dr. Eugene Wigner, Professor of Physics and 
Mathematics at Princeton University, will give the Twelfth 
Fritz London Memorial Lecture in the Biological Sciences 
Auditorium at 8:00 p.m. on Thursday, February 27th. He 
will speak on the subject "A Science of Consciousness." 

This lecture, sponsored by the Duke Chapter of the 
Society of Sigma Xi, honors Dr. Fritz London, one of the 
world's most distinguished theoretical physicists, who was a 
Professor at Duke from 1939 until his death in 1954. 

Professor Wigner's contributions in many branches of 
physics place him in the exclusive group of the most 
distinguished theorists of our century. He has been many 
times honored, including the award of the Nobel Prize in 
1963. The public is cordially invited. 



STUDENT UNION SYMPOSIUM 
"COMICS REFLECTING CONTEMPORARY CULTURE" 

Stan Lee, editor and head writer at the Marvel Comics 
Group, and Robert Lawrence, animator with 
Gantray-Lawrence Productions, will be the guests of the 
Student Union Educative Involvement Committee in a 
symposium at 8:15 p.m. on Thursday evening, February 
27th in the Music Room, East Duke Building. The 
following day, Mr. Lee will hold a seminar in Room 101 
Union Building at 11:00 a.m., followed at 1:00 p.m. by a 
seminar in Room 130 Psychology— Sociology Building, 
when Mr. Lawrence will show examples of his work in the 
cartoon field and respond to questions on them. 

Mr. Lee has been writing comics for well over twenty 
years, and in 1961 precipitated a revolution in the field 
when he and his co-worker Jack Kirby created the Fantastic 
Four. Since that time, he has created Spider-Man and the 
Hulk, two of the most popular comic book heroes of all 
time, and countless other characters. Mr. Lawrence has 
been animating Mr. Lee's stories for television for nearly 
three years. The Gantray-Lawrence produced cartoons are 
among the most popular on T.V. 

The University Community is invited to hear them 
discuss the concept of "Comics as a Reflection of 
Contemporary Culture." 

PLANT ECOLOGY SEMINAR 

Mr. David Patterson, graduate student in Botany, will 
present a seminar on "Chemical Inhibition and its 
Pertinence to a Study of Stem Flow" at the Plant Ecology 
Seminar on Friday, February 28th, at 12:30 p.m. in Room 
144 Biological Sciences Building, 
family will be charged. 



CHEMISTRY STAFF SEMINAR 

Professor Phillip H. Geil, Division of Polymer Science, 
Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio, will 
speak at the Chemistry Staff Seminar on Friday, February 
28th, at 3:30 p.m. in Room 130 Psychology— Sociology 
Building. The subject of Professor Geil's address will be 
"Relationships Between the Morphology of Polymer Single 
Crystals, Polypeptides and Biological Membranes." All 
interested persons are cordially invited to attend. 



ANNUAL NEREIDIAN SHOW 
"WATER WONDERLAND" 

The annual Nereidian Water Show entitled "Water 
Wonderland" will be presented on Friday, February 28th at 
8:00 p.m. and Sunday, March 2nd at 4:00 p.m. in the 
Woman's College Gymnasium. The public is invited to this 
presentation by the Nereidian Club free of charge. 



ALPHA-OMEGA PLAYERS 
"SPOON RIVER ANTHOLOGY" 

The entire community is invited to an evening of fresh 
humor and lively drama when the Alpha-Omega Players of 
North Hollywood present Edgar Lee Masters' American 
Classic "Spoon River Anthology" on Friday, February 
28th, at 8:15 p.m. in the University Chapel. 

Rich in the humor and dreams of America yesterday and 
today, "Spoon River Anthology" catches the significance 
of the people, their power and pathos, when surrounded by 
love, war and depression. Added to the pageantry and 
poetry are the songs of American such as "Times are 
Gettin' Hard Boys" and "Who Knows Where I'm Going." 

The Alpha-Omega Players, a professional company of 
actors dedicated to bringing outstanding theatre into 
churches, universities and military bases, are being 
sponsored locally by the Duke Episcopal Student Center. 
The public is cordially invited to attend the performance 
free of charge and a reception for the cast at the Student 
Center, Alexander Avenue immediately following the 
performance. 



STUDENT UNION MAJOR ATTRACTION 

JANIS JOPLIN AND THE 

JAMES COTTON BLUES BAND 

The Student Union Major Attractions Committee will 
present Janis Joplin, popular young blues singer, and the 
James Cotton Blues Band, in a concert on Saturday, March 
1st, at 7:00 p.m. in the Indoor Stadium. Tickets priced at 
$2.75 (reserved seats) and $2.25 (general admission) are 
available on the Quadrangle Monday through Friday from 
9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. and on Saturday from 9:00 a.m. to 
1:00 p.m. 



SENIOR RECITAL 
D. KERN HOLOMAN 

The Department of Music will present D. Kern Holoman 
in a bassoon recital on Sunday evening, March 2nd, at 8:15 
p.m. in the Music Room, East Duke Building. The soloist 
will be accompanied by John Newell, pianist, (Class of '71) 



and a chamber orchestra of members of the Duke 
Symphony. James Weber, first flutist of the Duke 
Symphony, will appear as flute soloist. 

A native of Raleigh, Mr. Holoman is a Senior major in 
Music and has studied bassoon with James Henry for five 
years. He is a member of Phi Beta Kappa, Delta Mu Tau 
(Duke music honorary fraternity), and is a Woodrow Wilson 
Fellowship designate. He has appeared as soloist with the 
Duke Symphony Orchestra and Concert Band, in addition 
to appearing as guest conductor of both groups. Currently 
Mr. Holoman is the President of the Duke Concert Band 
and plans graduate work in music. 

The program follows: 

Concerto in F Major Vivaldi 

for Bassoon, Strings, and Cembalo 
A llegro 
Largo 
A llegro 

Bachianas Brasileiras No. 6 Villa-Lobos 

for Flute and Bassoon 
Aria (Choro); Largo 
Fantasia; Allegro 

Solo de Concert, Opus 35 Piernes 

Fantaisie for Bassoon and Piano Bozza 

Lent-Andantino-Scherzando 

Sonata for Bassoon and Piano Etler 

Moderately show 
Fast 
Slow 
Fast 



STUDENT UNION EXHIBITON 
"APPALACHIAN CRAFTS" 

The Student Union Graphic Arts Committee is 
presenting an exhibition of Appalachian Crafts in the West 
Union Lounge until Friday, February 28th. The exhibition 
of crafts by members of the nine-state Southern Highland 
Handicraft Guild will exhibit samplings of pottery, weaving, 
jewelry, woodwork, glass, candles, sculpture, batik, hooked 
rugs, printworking, cornshuck, vegetable dyeing and various 
graphic materials. 

Some of the items may be purchased at the conclusion 
of the show. Information is available in Room 207 Flowers 
Building or by calling extension 2911. 



PHYSICAL FITNESS PROGRAM 
JOGGING ORIENTATION 

The University Community is invited to participate in a 
medically approved physical fitness program, sponsored and 
recommended by the Department of Health and Physical 
Education for Men. An orientation will be held on Monday, 
February 24th, in Classroom 136 of the Indoor Stadium 
(enter through North Lobby). The program is under the 
direction of John Friedrich (extension 2202); Al Buehler 
(4171); and John Riebel (3212) and is open to all 
interested persons — faculty, students, staff and families. A 
fee of $4.00 for adults, $2.00 for children, and $5.00 for a 



Jogging groups will begin on Wednesday, February 26th 
in the Indoor Stadium. Thereafter the groups will meet as 
follows: Monday, Wednesday, and Friday — 7:30—8:00 
a.m. and 5:15—5:45 p.m. The regular Faculty Fitness 
program will continue as scheduled on Tuesdays and 
Thursdays from 12:30-1:30 p.m. 



SUMMER 1969 
EUROPEAN GROUP FLIGHTS 

For the eighth consecutive year, the Student Activities 
Office, 202-A Flowers Building, is offering Duke European 
Group Fare Flights to members of the Duke University 
Community (faculty, staff, students, and employees). The 
Activities Office will provide tickets only for economy class 
jet air transportation. All other arrangements are the 
responsibility of the individual. 

All faculty, staff, students, and employees of Duke 
University are eligible who have been associated with Duke 
for six months prior to departure times. 



Dates . . . 

Flight 1 (Wash.) Pan Am June 9 
Flight 2 (NYC) Air India June 9 
Flight 3 (NYC) Air India June 10 
Flight 4 (NYC) Pan Am July 23 



(Paris) Pan Am Aug. 26 

(Lon.) Air India Aug. 28 

(Lon.) Air India July 14 

(Lon.) Pan Am Aug. 27 



Fares . . . 



Minimum of 25 persons 



NYC to London 

Adult $300.00 

Child (12 & over) 300.00 
Child (2-11) . . . 150.00 
Child (under 2) . . .30.00 



Washington to Paris 

Adult $363.80 

Child (12 & over) 363.80 
Child (2-11) . . . 181.90 
Child (under 2) . . .36.40 



Minimum of 50 persons 



NYC to London 

Adult $245.00 

Child (12 & over) 245.00 
Child (2-11) . . . 122.50 
Child (under 2) . . .24.50 



Washington to Paris 

Adult $297.80 

Child (12 & over) 297.80 
Child (2-11) . . .148.90 
Child (under 2) . . .29.80 



(All fares are effective as of 1 April 1968) 
Child's fare is based on age on date of flight departure. No 
deposit required for children under 12. 

Application forms are available at the Flowers Information 
Desk and Room 207 Flowers Building. 



PAGE BOX OFFICE 
TICKET SALES 

Members of the University Community are alerted to the 
ticket sales for coming events on campus in Page Box 
Office, 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Mondays through Fridays. 

Advance sales to Duke University Community only for 
the Nikolais Dance Company's performance on Tuesday, 
April 29th, in Page Auditorium will continue from Monday, 
February 24th until March 3rd. General sales will begin on 
Tuesday, April 4th. 



SPECIAL UNIVERSITY ANNOUNCEMENTS 

The committee on student concerns was appointed by 
the President upon the recommendation of the Executive 
Committee of the Academic Council prior to the events of 
Thursday, February 13. The committee is charged with 
understanding the manifest concerns of the student body 
and reconciling these to the maximum extent possible with 
the educational mission of the University. It intends to 
achieve this goal through consultation with students, 
faculty, and administrative officers. 

The committee intends to act through the 
decision-making bodies of these groups. Its purpose is to 
facilitate action. Its members are Alan C. Kerckhoff, 
Chairman; Clark C. Havighurst, Martin Lakin, Thomas A. 
Langford, and Richard L. Watson. 



ADDITIONS AND DELETIONS 

Concert of Small Orchestra re-scheduled for 
Friday, March 7th, at 8:15 p.m. in Baldwin 
Auditorium. 

Phi Beta Kappa Meeting at 4:00 p.m. in Room 208 
Flowers Building on Wednesday, March 5th. 



Duke University 

CALENDAR/ 




Mar. 2-9, 1969 



Volume 69 



Published Feb. 28, 1969 



Number 9 



Sunday, March 2 

10:30-10:45 a.m. Carillon Recital. Mr. J. Samuel 
Hammond, University Carillonneur. 

11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship. University 
Chapel. Preacher: The Reverend Dr. Howard C. 
Wilkinson, Chaplain to the University. Sermon: "Plain 
Talk About Our University." Broadcast over Radio 
Station WDNC. 

11:25 a.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Challenges in 
Education." WCHL Chapel Hill. Mr. Paul Fendt will 
discuss "Employee Training and Development." 

2:00 p.m. Rugby: Old Blue (New York) vs. Duke. East 
Campus. 

2:00 p.m. Student Union Arts Festival Seminar: Opera. 
Room 108 Flowers Building. Speaker: Dr. John Clum. 

3:00—5:00 p.m. East Campus Gymnasium: Open to 
students, faculty, and staff for recreation (swimming, 
badminton, volleyball, basketball, table tennis). 

4:00 p.m. Annual Nereidian Water Show: "Water 
Wonderland." Woman's College Gymnasium. 

4:00—6:00 p.m. International Open House. 2022 Campus 
Drive. 

7:00 and 9:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page Auditorium. 
"THE PARTY" with Peter Sellers and Claudine 
Longet. "Directed by Blake Edwards, a man who has 
an understandable affection for the old comic forms 
and who directed Mr. Sellers so successfully in 'A Shot 
in the Dark' and 'The Pink Panther.' The idea is . . . 
how a good-natured . . Mr. Sellers cast as a woefully 
stupid actor from India turns a stuffily posh 
Hollywood dinner party into a shambles of broken 
dishware and plumbing and shattered egos." Vincent 
Canaby, N.Y. Times. 

7:30 p.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Challenges in 
Education." WPTF Raleigh. Dr. Orrin Pilkey will 
discuss "Black Shells: A Key to the Past." 

8:15 p.m. Senior Recital: D. Kern Holoman, Bassoon. 
Music Room, East Duke Building. 

Monday, March 3 

4:15 p.m. Zoology Seminar. Room 111 Biological Sciences 

Building. Speaker: Dr. Ian C. Potter. 
4:15—5:30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 

faculty, staff members, and students. 
7:00 p.m. International Folk Dancing. The Ark, East 

Campus. 



8:00 p.m. Erasmus Club Meeting. Green Room, East Duke 
Building. Speaker: Professor Grover Smith. 

8:00 p.m. Student Union Major Speakers Symposium. 
Emphasis: The South. Topic: "Urbanization and 
Industrialization." 



Tuesday, March 4 



10:00 a.m. Divinity School Chapel Service. University 

Chapel. Alumni Visiting Speaker: The Reverend Al 

Fisher, Centenary Methodist Church, New Bern, N.C. 
4:15—5:30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 

faculty, staff members, and students. 
7:00-10:00 p.m. Arts and Crafts Workshop in 

Two-Dimensional Media. Room 108 Art Building. East 

Campus. 
7:30—10:00 p.m. Scottish Country Dancing. Presbyterian 

Student Center. 
8:15 p.m. AAUP Meeting. Moot Courtroom, Law School. 

Panel Discussion. 



Wednesday, , March 5 

10:00 a.m. Divinity School Chapel Service. University 

Chapel. Alumni Visitor Speaker: The Reverend Al 

Fisher, Centenary Methodist Church, New Bern, N.C. 
4:00 p.m. Phi Beta Kappa Meeting. Room 208 Flowers 

Building. 
4:15—5:30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 

faculty, staff members, and students. 
6:25-8:00 p.m. Chapel Choir Rehearsal. University 

Chapel. 
7:00 p.m. Student Union Pre-Artists Series Seminar: Betty 

Bullock Talbot. Room 208 Flowers Building. 
7:00—9:00 p.m. Open House Badminton for all men and 

women: faculty and students. East Campus 

Gymnasium. 
8:15 p.m. Duke Artists Series: Clifford Curzon, Pianist. 

Page Auditorium. 



Thursday, March 6 

10:00 a.m. Divinity School Chapel Service. University 

Chapel. Alumni Visitor Speaker: The Reverend Al 

Fisher, Centenary Methodist Church, New Bern, N.C. 
2:00 p.m. Wojciech Matuszewski in Chopin-Liszt Concert. 

Music Room, East Duke Building. 
4:00 p.m. Lecture by Visiting Demographer: Family 

Planning in India. Speaker: Dr. Ashish Bose. Room 136 

Social Science Building. 
4:15—5:30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 

faculty, staff members, and students. 
5:00—6:00 p.m. Dean's Hour. Hospital Amphitheater. 

Speaker: Dr. Lewis P. Rowland. 
5:15 p.m. Faculty Volleyball. Card Gymnasium. 
7:00—10:00 p.m. Arts and Crafts Workshop in 

Two-Dimensional Media. Room 108 Art Building, East 

Campus. 
8:15—9:30 p.m. West Campus Swimming Pool open to 

faculty members and their families. Faculty children 

will be admitted only when accompanied by their 

parents. 



Friday, March 7 



10:00 a.m. Divinity School Chapel Service. University 
Chapel. Indian Springs Glee Club from Alabama. 

12:30 p.m. Plant Ecology Seminar. Room 144 Biological 
Sciences Building. Speaker: Miss Susan Week. 

3:30 p.m. The final examination of Mr. Thomas R. Davis, 
Jr. for the Ph.D. degree in Religion. Room 210 
Divinity School. 

3:30 p.m. Chemistry Staff Seminar. Room 130 
Psychology— Sociology Building. Speaker: Professor 
Irwin Fridovich. 

4:00 p.m. Anatomy— Physical Anthropology Seminar. 
Room 2031 Duke Hospital. Speaker: Dr. William 
Montagna. 

4:15—5:30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. Faculty 
daughters, ages 6 to 16, may also swim; those 10 and 
under must be accompanied by their mothers. 

7:00—9:00 p.m. Open House Badminton for all men and 
women: faculty and students. East Campus 
Gymnasium. 

8:00 p.m. Student Union Cinematic Arts Committee Film 
Series. Auditorium, Biological Sciences Building. The 
first of the neo-realist films "Open Cities," is the 
struggle of the Rome resistance against German 
occupation in World War II. "La Strada," neo-realism 
on a new plane, explores the story of everyman's 
loneliness and search for life. 

8:15 p.m. Annual French Play: 'Les Femmes Savantes." 
Music Room, East Duke Building. 

8:15 p.m. Chamber Orchestra Concert. Baldwin 
Auditorium. 



Saturday, March 8 



10:55 a.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Challenges in 
Education." WDNC Durham. 

3:00—5:00 p.m. East Campus Gymnasium: Open to 
students, faculty, and staff for recreation (swimming, 
badminton, volleyball, basketball, table tennis). 

7:00 p.m. Indian Film Showing: "Bandini." Auditorium, 
Biological Sciences Building. 

7:15 and 9:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page Auditorium. 
"RASHOMON." directed by Akira Kurosawa and 
winner of The Grand Prize, Vencie Film Festival and 
the Academy Award for the Best Foreign Film. "Great. 
The International Film Festival passed over the best 
that Europe and America had to offer; to give first 
prize to 'Rashomon.' They had never seen a picture 
quite like it." - Life. 

8:15 p.m. Annual French Play: "Les Femmes Savantes." 
Music Room, East Duke Building. 



Sunday, March 9 

10:30-10:45 a.m. Carillon Recital. Mr. J. Samuel 

Hammond, University Carillonneur. 
11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship. University 

Chapel. Preacher: The Reverend Professor James T. 

Cleland, Dean of the Chapel. Broadcast over Radio 

Station WDNC. 
11:25 a.m.. Duke University Radio Program, "Challenges in 

Education." WCHL Chapel Hill. 
2:00 p.m. Student Union Arts Festival Seminar: Opera. 

Room 108 Flowers Building. Speaker: Dr. John Clum. 
3:00—5:00 p.m. East Campus Gymnasium: Open to 

students, faculty and staff for recreation (swimming, 

badminton, volleyball, basketball, table tennis). 
4:00—6:00 p.m. International Open House. 2022 Campus 

Drive. 
7:15 and 9:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page Auditorium. 

"RASHOMON." 
7:30 p.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Challenges in 

Education." WPTF Raleigh. 
8:15 p.m. Annual French Play: 'Les Femmes Savantes." 

Music Room, East Duke Building. 



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NOTICES for the Duke University Calendar 
should be submitted IN WRITTEN FORM to Room 
207 Flowers Building, not later than 5:00 p.m., 
Tuesday. Ext. 2911. 

Published by Duke University Student Activities 
Department, Box KM, Duke Station, Durham, N.C, 
27706 each week when school is in session. 
Subscriptions: $2.50 per year. Address inquiries to 
Box KM, Duke Station, Durham, N.C. 27706. Second 
class postage paid at Durham, N.C. 



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UNIVERSITY SERVICE OF WORSHIP 

The Reverend Dr. Howard C. Wilkinson, Chaplain to the 
University, will deliver the sermon at the University Service 
of Worship on Sunday, March 2nd, at 11:00 a.m. in the 
University Chapel. The sermon topic is "Plain Talk About 
Our University." 



STUDENT UNION ARTS FESTIVAL 
OPERA FOR THE NON-BELIEVER 

Dr. John Clum of the English Department will present a 
set of two informal discussions on opera to be given in 
Room 108 Flowers Building at 2:00 p.m. on consecutive 
Sundays, March 2nd and 9th. 

The first talk, on Sunday, March 2nd, will cover "Drama 
as Opera." In demonstrating how music affects the mood 
on stage, Dr. Clum will read scenes from Shakespeare, 
Sophocles, and Buchner and play recorded scenes of Verdi's 
"Otello," Strauss' ' Electra," and Berg's "Wozzeck." 

The second talk, on Sunday, March 9th, will be a 
discussion of Wagner's "Tristan and Isolde" as the 
apotheosis of romanticism and its affinity with the music of 
the Doors and other pop music groups. 



ANNUAL NEREIDIAN SHOW 
"WATER WONDERLAND" 

The annual Nereidian Water Show entitled "Water 
Wonderland" will be presented on Sunday, March 2nd, at 
4:00 p.m. in the Woman's College Gymnasium. The public 
is invited to this presentation by the Nereidian Club free of 
charge. 

SENIOR RECITAL 
D. KERN HOLOMAN 

The Department of Music will present D. Kern Holoman 
in a bassoon recital on Sunday evening, March 2nd, at 8:15 
p.m. in the Music Room, East Duke Building. The soloist 
will be accompanied by John Newell, pianist, (Class of '71) 
and a chamber orchestra of members of the Duke 
Symphony. James Weber, first flutist of the Duke 
Symphony, will appear as flute soloist. 

A native of Raleigh, Mr. Holoman is a Senior major in 
Music and has studied bassoon with James Henry for five 
years. He is a member of Phi Beta Kappa, Delta Mu Tau 
(Duke music honorary fraternity), and is a Woodrow Wilson 
Fellowship designate. He has appeared as soloist with the 
Duke Symphony Orchestra and Concert Band, in addition 
to appearing as guest conductor of both groups. Currently 
Mr. Holoman is the President of the Duke Concert Band 
and plans graduate work in music. 

The program follows: 
Concerto in F Major Vivaldi 

for Bassoon, Strings, and Cembalo 
Allegro 
Largo 
Allegro 



Bachianas Brasileiras No. ( 
for Flute and Bassoon 
Aria (Choro); Largo 
Fantasia; Allegro 



Villa-Lobos 



Solo de Concert, Opus 35 Pierness 

Fantaisie for Bassoon and Piano Bozza 

Lent-Andantino-Scherzando 

Sonata for Bassoon and Piano Etler 

Moderately slow 
Fast 
Slow 
Fast 

ZOOLOGY SEMINAR 

The Department of Zoology will hold a seminar on 
Monday, March 3rd, at 4:15 p.m. in Room 111 Biological 
Sciences Building. Dr. Ian C. Potter, Temporary Instructor, 
will speak on "Lampreys Down Under." Dr. Potter was 
born and educated in England, completing his MA at 
Oxford in 1962. He then migrated to Australia where he 
became engaged in a doctoral program at the University of 
New South Wales on the biology of lampreys of the 
Southern Hemisphere. He has published a number of papers 
on the group dealing with a range of subject matter from 
gametogenesis and haemoglobins to life history and 
ecology. 

Coffee and tea will be served at 4:00 p.m. 



ERASMUS CLUB MEETING 

The Erasmus Club will meet on Monday, March 3rd, at 
8:00 p.m. in the Green Room, East Duke Building. Grover 
Smith, Professor of English, will speak on "Aldous Huxley 
as a Letter Writer." The talk is open to faculty, students, 
and interested members of the community. Professor Smith 
is editor of The Letters of Aldous Huxley, to be published 
later this year. He is also author of T.S. Eliot's Poetry and 
Plays and editor of s,Josiah Royce's Seminar, 1913—1914. 



S.U. MAJOR SPEAKERS SYMPOSIUM 
"EMPHASIS: THE SOUTH'" 

"Emphasis: The South" is a symposium program 
designed to focus on the problems and assets of the area of 
the United States generally known at "The South." The 
program is designed to be educative — imparting, through 
the medium of panel and informal discussions with public 
and academic leaders, a more complete picture of Southern 
life than is generally perceived. 

The first session, "Urbanization and Industrialization," 
on the evening of Monday, March 3rd, at 8:00 p.m. in Page 
Auditorium, will explore the difficulties and promises in 
urban and industrial growth in the South. The session is 
open to the public. Participants will be the following: Dr. 
Frank T. DeVyver, Vice-Provost, Duke University, 
Moderator; Mr. William B. Hartsfield, Mayor Emeritus of 
Atlanta, Georgia; Mr. Charles B. Wade, Jr., Vice-President 
of R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company; and Dr. E. William 
Noland, University Distinguished Professor of Sociology, 
University of North Carolina at Greensboro. 

INDIAN FILM SHOWING 

The Duke Indian students will present an Indian film, 
"Bandini" (Prisoner), on Saturday, March 8th, at 7:00 p.m. 
in the Biological Sciences Auditorium. Admission of $1.00 
may be paid at the door. Featuring India's greatest screen 



personalities, Ashok Kumar, Nutan, Dharminder, Raja 
Pranjpe, and directed by Bimal Roy, the film will carry 
English sub-titles. 

"Bandini" is a story of an unusual prisoner, Kalyani, a 
young, innocent-looking, well-behaved and helpful girl. No 
one knew the past of this young criminal, not even the 
handsome jail-doctor Devendra who had fallen in love with 
her. Disregarding the social stigma attached to Kalyani, as 
she was a prisoner, Devendra confessed his love for her and 
proposed marriage. But she would not respond. Kalyani 
kept waiting for Bikash Ghosh, a terrorist leader who had 
declared her to be his wife under dramatic circumstances, 
and had promised to marry her on his release from the jail. 
But there was no news from Bikash. The most agonising 
moment for her came when both Devendra and Bikash 
crossed her path once again, and she stood at the 
cross-roads of her life. 

AAUP PANEL DISCUSSION 

The American Association of University Professors will 
hold a panel discussion on "Aspects of the Academic Crisis: 
Implications for Duke" at 8:15 p.m. on Tuesday, March 
4th, in the Moot Courtroom, Law School. The panelists and 
their topics are: Dean Jane Philpott — "On the question of 
'relevancy' with respect to curriculum at Duke;" Dean 
James L. Meriam — "Perspectives on University Freedom;" 
Professor Jack J. Preiss — "The role of Duke University in 
Durham;" and Professor Thomas B. Rainey — 
"Traditionalism and activism at Duke: On modernizing the 
structure of this University." The purpose of this meeting is 
to generate discussion of these issues by the faculty. All 
members of the faculty are urged to attend. 

PHI BETA KAPPA MEETING 

The annual business meeting of the Duke Chapter of Phi 
Beta Kappa will be held on Wednesday, March 5th, at 4:00 
p.m. in Room 208 Flowers Building. Undergraduate, 
alumnus, and honorary elections will be considered; plans 
for the spring dinner and initiation will be presented; and 
officers for the next academic year will be elected. All 
members presently on campus are urged to be present. 
Inquiries should be directed to the Secretary, Professor 
W.F. Stinespring, 113 Divinity School. 



S.U. PRE-ARTISTS SERIES SEMINAR 
BETTY BULLOCK TALBOT 

The Student Union's Performing Arts Committee will 
present Betty Bullock Talbot in the Pre-Artists Series 
Seminar for Clifford Curzon's concert. Mrs. Talbot will lead 
the seminar from 7:00 until 8:00 p.m. in Room 208 
Flowers Building on the same evening as the concert, 
Wednesday, March 5th. The public is cordially invited 
without charge. 

A recent addition to the Department of Music, Mrs. 
Talbot is a native North Carolinian and a graduate of 
Oberlin College where she won and retained throughout her 
study there the Bezazian Performance Scholarship in Piano. 
After graduation from Oberlin she won the West German 
Government grant for study in Munich where she studied 
with Rosl Schneid. Further study followed with Kurt 
Neumiller in Salzburg at the Mozarteum. Returning to the 



United States she completed her work on a master's degree 
at U.N.C. in Chapel Hill where she held the Sidney Dowd 
Piano Scholarship and was one of the performers with the 
educational television's Beethoven piano recitals. 

DUKE ARTISTS SERIES 
CLIFFORD CURZON,PIANIST 

Distinguished British pianist Clifford Curzon will be 
presented by the Duke Artists Series in a 
Schubert-Schumann Recital on Wednesday, March 5th, at 
8:15 p.m. in Page Auditorium. Remaining single tickets 
priced at $3.25, 2.75, and 2.25 are available in Page Box 
Office (684-4059). 

Recognized as one of Britain's finest pianists and one of 
the truly great artists of our time, Mr. Curzon is one of the 
most welcomed international concert commuters. His 
brilliant career began when he was accepted, at the age of 
twelve, by the Royal Academy in his native London. The 
youngest pupil ever to be accepted by the Academyhe won 
not only scholarships but all the prizes open to a pianist. 
His early studies were with Tobias Matthay and Katharine 
Goodson followed by work with Arthur Schnabel in were 
with Tobias Matthay and Katharine Goodson followed by 
work with Arthur Schnabel in Berlin, Wanda Landowska, 
and Nadia Boulanger in Paris, symphony orchestra of the 
world. In the United States, his frequent television 
symphony orchestras of the world. In the United States, his 
frequent television earned him a large and appreciative 
following. His program follows: 
Sonata in B flat major (Op. post.) Schubert 

Molto moderato 

Andante sostenuto 

Scherzo 

Allegro ma non troppo 



Six Moments Musicaux, Op. 94 
C major (moderato) 
A flat major (andantino) 
F minor (allegro moderato 
F minor (allegro moderato) 
F minor (allegro vivace) 
A flat major (allegretto) 

Fantasia in C major. Op. 1 7 



Schubert 



Schumann 



WOJCIECH MATUSZEWSKI 
CHOPIN-LISZT CONCERT 

Wojciech Matuszewski, a rising young Polish pianist and 
interpreter of Chopin, will be heard in a free public concert 
at 2:00 p.m. on Thursday, March 6th, in the Music Room, 
East Duke Building. The program is made up of 19th 
century virtuoso piano music relevant to the course content 
of two music history classes that will form the nucleus of 
the audience. 

Matuszewski has chosen the following works of Chopin: 
Ballade in F Minor, Op. 52; Nocturne in F Sharp Major, Op. 
15; Scherzo in B Minor, Op. 20; Andante spianato e Grande 
Polonaise, Op. 22. From the writings of Franz Liszt he has 
chosen two of the Transcendental Etudes — Evening 
Harmonies, No. 12, and Will-o-the-wisps, No. 5; the 
Mephisto Waltz, the concert etude "La Leggierezza" and 
the Liszt transcription of Wagner's Liebestod from Tristan 
and Isolde. 



Matuszewski made his professional debut at age 14, 
when he played the Beethoven Piano Concerto No. 3 with 
the Lodz Philharmonic. In 1955 he was named Best 
Performer in a piano competition held in Lodz for the 
interpretation of Polish music; he was the youngest 
contestant. In 1962 he was awarded the Silver Medal with 
distinction at the Geneva International Piano Competitions, 
and in 1964 he received the Prix Special at the Queen 
Elizabeth of Belgium Inte' lational Piano Competition in 
Brussels. In 1966 he was named winner of the Baltimore 
Music Competitions, and in August, 1968, he won the 
Vianna da Motta, an international competition in Lisbon, 
Portugal. The 28-year old pianist has played three concert 
tours- 52 performances in the United States and Canada 
during the fall of 1967, and shortly after his Duke 
appearance he will leave for a 40-concert tour of Austrialia. 

Matuszewski has appeared with the Polish National 
Symphony and all major orchestras in Poland, with the 
Leningrad Symphony, the Orchestre de la Suisse Romande, 
the National Orchestra of Portugal and others. As one of 
Poland's outstanding musicians, he was chosen by the 
Polish Ministry of Culture to perform for Soviet officials 
Leonid Breezhnev and Alexsai Kosygin when they paid a 
visit to Poland. In mid-February, he made a Rockefeller 
Fund appearance in Town Hall, New York City. 

INDIAN SPRINGS GLEE CLUB 
IN OPEN CONCERT 

The Indian Springs School Glee Club will appear in an 
open concert at the Duke University Chapel on Friday, 
March 7th, at 10:00 a.m. This group, composed of eighty 
boys from Indian Springs School, is regarded by many as 
the finest high school choral group in the Southeast. Now 
on spring tour, this concert marks their first appearance 
since returning from a European tour last summer when the 
boys visited France, Belgium, Germany, England, and 
Switzerland, and presented a special concert before the 
International Society for Music Education meeting in 
Dijon, France. 

The Glee Club, which is directed by John Jennings, 
represents Indian Springs School, a private preparatory 
school for boys located near Birmingham, Alabama. With 
almost half of the student body participating, it is the 
largest student organization on campus. The group's 
program consists of many different styles of music, ranging 
from Renaissance church pieces to new "experimental" 
compositions. This competence and diversification insures a 
memorable experience of vocal entertainment. The public is 
cordially invited . 

PLANT ECOLOGY SEMINAR 

Miss Susan Week, graduate student in Botany, will 
present a seminar on "A Proposed Study of Succession on 
an Induced Scrub Savanna in Jamaica" at the Plant Ecology 
Seminar on Friday, March 7th, at 12:30 p.m. in Room 144 
Biological Sciences Building. 

CHEMISTRY STAFF SEMINAR 

Professor Irwin Fridovich, Department of Biochemistry, 
will speak at the Chemistry Staff Seminar on Friday, March 
7th, at 3:30 p.m. in Room 130 Psychology— Sociology 
Building. The subject of Dr. Fridovich's address will be 
"The Enzymatic Reduction of Oxygen." All interested 
persons are cordially invited to attend. 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. Thomas R. Davis, Jr. for 
the Ph.D. degree in Religion will be held on Friday, March 
7th, at 3:30 p.m. in Room 210 Divinity School. The 
subject of Mr. Davis's dissertation is "Integrity and 
Compromise in the Public Thought and Policy Positions of 
Adlai Stevenson." The committee to conduct the 
examination consists of Professors Waldo Beach, Hans 
Hillerbrand, Creighton Lacy, Herbert Sullivan, and John 
Hallowell. Professor Waldo Beach will preside. 

LECTURE BY VISITING DEMOGRAPHER 
FAMILY PLANNING IN INDIA 

A lecture on "Family Planning in India: Facts and 
Fancies" will be given by Dr. Ashish Bose, visiting 
demographer in the Program in Comparative Studies on 
Southern Asia from the School of Economic Growth, Delhi 
University. The lecture will be held in Room 136 Social 
Science Building on Thursday, March 6th, at 4:00 p.m. The 
public is cordially invited to attend. 

ANATOMY-PHYSICAL ANTHROPOLOGY SEMINAR 

Dr. William Montagna, Director, Oregon Regional 
Primate Research Center, and Professor, University of 
Oregon, will speak on "Baldness in Man and Nonhuman 
Primates" at the Anatomy— Physical Anthropology Seminar 
on Friday, March 7th, at 4:00 p.m. in Room 2031, Duke 
Hospital. 

DEAN'S HOUR 

The Dean's Hour will be held on Thursday, March 6th, 
from 5:00 to 6:00 p.m. in the Hospital Amphitheater. Dr. 
Lewis P. Rowland, Professor and Chairman of the 
Department of Neurology, Hospital of the University of 
Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, will speak on "Glycogen 
Storage Diseases of Muscle: Biochemical Genetics Is Not 
All." 



ANNUAL FRENCH PLAY 
"LES FEMMES SAV ANTES" 

The performance of "Les Femmes Savantes" by Moliere 
marks the thirty-third anniversary for the Department of 
Romance Language's yearly presentation of full-scale 
French drama. Except for a few years during World War II, 
the University Community has had the opportunity to 
attend these productions performed in French, all of which 
have been directed, produced, and costumed by Mrs. Neal 
Dow of the Romance Language Department. 

There will be three performances in the Music Room, 
East Duke Building on Friday, Saturday, and Sunday 
evenings, March 7th, 8th and 9th at 8:15 p.m. All 
performances are open to the public without charge. 

"Les Femmes Savantes" satirizes the blue-stockinged 
"lady intellectual" and her pretense of great knowledge. 
The cast of multiple female leads includes Vivian Klutz as 
Philaminte; Betty Rock as Belise; Julie Field as Armande: 
Sue Hamilton as Henriette; and Carol Knotts as Marline. 
The male roles will be played by Clive Wilson as Chrysale; 
George Yearling as Trissotin; Sam Wickers as Clitandre; Ken 
Slocum as Vadius; and William Chappell as Ariste. 



CHAMBER ORCHESTRA CONCERT 
RE-SCHEDULED PERFORMANCE 

The Chamber Orchestra Concert, originally scheduled 
for February 14th, will be given on Friday evening, March 
7th, at 8:15 p.m. in Baldwin Auditorium. The forty piece 
Chamber Orchestra will feature several outstanding soloists 
from the Department of Music and featuring Mr. and Mrs. 
Bunyan Webb, guitarist and harpsichordist respectively. 
James Weber, a graduate student in the Department of 
Mathematics, is flute soloist in the Bach Brandenburg 
Concerto. The public is cordially invited to attend. There 
will be no admission charge. 

The program follows: 

Symphony No. 8 Boyce 



Brandenburg Concerto No. 5 
Giorgio Ciompi, violin 
James Weber, flute 
Susan Webb, harpsichord 

Recitative and Rondo 
"Ch'io mi scordi di te?" 

Mary Burgess, soprano 

Betty Talbot, piano 
Concerto for Guitar and Orchestra 

Bunyan Webb, guitar 

Music for Strings 



Bach 



Mozart 



Bresgen 



Porter 



STUDENT UNION ART EXHIBITION 
PICASSO: CERAMICS AND GRAPHICS 

Two examples of Picasso's excursions into the diverse 
minor arts — ceramics and graphics — are on view in the 
Gallery area of the West Union Building from March 
2nd— 23rd through the exhibition program of the Student 
Union's Graphic Arts Committee. Picasso Arts, Inc., New 
York City, has lent twenty-seven ceramics and twelve 
graphics for the exhibition entitled, "Picasso: Ceramics and 
Graphics," which is circulating throughout the United 
States and Canada under the auspices of The American 
Federation of Arts. 

Picasso began to work in the ceramic medium after 
moving to the south of France in 1946. In the little town of 
Vallauris, a dying earthenware manufacturing center, he 
begahis work, collaborating with Suzanne and Georges 
Ramie who operated the Madoura studio there. He was 
attracted to the medium because he could combine both 
the sculptural qualities of clay and the illusory aspects of 
overpainting; and also, since the ceramic ware was always 
fired, the colors would not fade, and the original intent of 
the artist would remain to the viewer. 

These ceramics fall into two categories: Empreinte 
Original de Picasso and Edition Picasso. In the first, Picasso 
works in the negative with a wet mold, carving the design 
into the surface; the cast reproduces the object in reverse. 
In the Edition, the artist works in the positive, creating the 
design exactly as it will be viewed. From this a mold is 
made, the incisions following the original and indicating 
where the color is to be applied. All the editions are limited 
and, though Picasso does not cast or paint the editions, he 
examines and approves each finished piece. 

Picasso learned the technique of lithography in Fernand 
Mourlot's studio in Paris. After moving to the south of 
France he continued to make lithographs with zinc plates 
and stones sent him by Mourlot. He also made linoleum 
cuts and estampes. Impressions are made by printers in 
Vallauris under the direction of M. Arnera. Picasso 
supervises. 



COMPUTATION CENTER COURSES 

The Computation Center will offer short courses this 
spring in both PL/I and FORTRAN. The courses are 
designed for persons with no previous experience in 
computer programming. The PL/I course will meet from 
4:00 to 5:00 p.m. on Mondays and Wednesdays. The 
FORTRAN course will meet at the same time on Tuesdays 
and Thursdays. Both courses start the week of March 10th 
and last eight weeks. Both will meet in Room 311 Social 
Sciences Building. To sign up for either course, call the 
Computation Center secretary at Extension 4009. 

DUKE PLAYERS PERFORMANCE 

' DARK OF THE MOON" 

ADVANCE TICKET SALES 

Tickets for the next Duke Players major production, 
"Dark of the Moon," will go on sale on Monday, March 
3rd, in the Page Box Office. The play is a highly theatrical 
treatment of the "Barbara Allen" legend about a witch-boy 
who wishes to be human for love of a mortal girl. Set in the 
Smokey Mountains of North Carolina, the play tells how 
the witch-boy makes a compact with a "conjur-woman" by 
which he will attain mortality, and the tragedy which 
ultimately befalls the girl he loves. 

"Dark of the Moon" will be presented in Page 
Auditorium on Friday and Saturday, March 14th and 15th 
at 8:15 p.m. and will involve the talents of thirty actors, 
singers, dancers and musicians under the direction of 
Richard Parks, Director of Duke Players. Mrs. Lyn Clark 
will choreograph the dances and Edgar Warren Williams will 
serve as composer and musical director. Duke Players 
Technical Director, Hitoshi Sato, has designed a large and 
intricate setting which provides an exciting environment for 
the play. 

Ticket prices for "Dark of the Moon" are scaled as 
follows: $2.00 - General Public, $1.75 - Faculty and 
Staff, $1.50 — Students. All seats are reserved. For 
reservations or further information, call 684-3181 or 
684-4059. 

E.I.T. LECTURE SERIES 

The Duke Chapter of Pi Tau Sigma will present a series 
of lectures in preparation for the Engineer-in-Training 
examination. All lectures will be held in the Auditorium of 
the Engineering Building and are open to the public 
without charge. The examination will be given on Saturday, 
May 3rd, from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. in the Engineering 
Building. 

The series follows: 

1. Mathematics March 10 7:00 p.m. 

2. Chemistry March 18 7:00 p.m. 

3. Electricity April 2 7:00 p.m. 
(Circuits) 

4. Statics and April 10 7:00 p.m. 
Strength 

5. Kinematics and April 14 7:00 p.m. 
Dynamics 

6. Thermodynamics April 22 7:00 p.m. 

7. Fluid Mechanics April 30 6:15 p.m. 

SPECIAL UNIVERSITY ANNOUNCEMENTS 

The newly constituted Personnel Policy Committee of 
the University is as follows: Charles B. Huestis, Chairman; 
John C. McKinney, Stuart M. Sessoms, E.C. Bryson, and 
William R. Linke. 

The Duke University Employee Relations Advisory 
Committee has the following members: Professors John 
Buettner-Janusch, Robert Carson, Allan Romberg, Juanita 
Kreps, and Jack Preiss. 



Duke University 

CALENDAR. 




Mar. 9-16, 1969 



Volume 69 



Published Mar. 7, 1969 



Number 10 



Sunday, March 9 



10:30-10:45 a.m. Carillon Recital. Mr. J. Samuel 
Hammond, University Carillonneur. 

11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship. University 
Chapel. Preacher: The Reverend Professor James T. 
Cleland, Dean of the Chapel. Sermon: "Saints in Allen 
Building." Broadcast over Radio Station WDNC. 

11:25 a.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Challenges in 
Education." WCHL Chapel Hill. Mr. Dick Parks will 
discuss "The Makings of a University Theatre." 

2:00 p.m. Student Union Arts Festival Seminar: Opera. 
Speaker: Dr. John Clum. Room 108 Flowers Building. 

3:00—5:00 p.m. East Campus Gymnasium: Open to 
students, faculty, and staff for recreation (swimming, 
badminton, volleyball, basketball, table tennis). 

4:00—5:30 p.m. Gallery Reception: Philip Jamison 
Exhibition. Duke University Art Museum. 

4:00—6:00 p.m. International Open House. 2022 Campus 
Drive. 

7:15 and 9:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page Auditorium. 
"RASHOMON" directed by Akira Kurosawa and 
winner of The Grand Prize, Venice Film Festival and 
the Academy Award for the Best Foreign Film. "Great. 
The International Film Festival passed over the best 
that Europe and America had to offer; to give first 
prize to 'Rashomon.' They had never seen a picture 
quite like it." -- Life. 

7:30 p.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Challenges in 
Education." WPTF Raleigh. Mr. Joseph Burch will 
discuss "Support for Research Projects." 

8:15 p.m. Annual French Play: "Les Femmes Savantes." 
Music Room, East Duke Building. 



Monday, March 10 

4:15 p.m. Zoology Seminar. Room 111 Biological Sciences 

Building. Speaker: Mr. Joel Cohen. 
4:15—5:30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 

faculty, staff members, and students. 
5:15 p.m. Faculty Volleyball. Card Gymnasium. 
6:15 p.m. AAUW Meeting. YWCA, Chapel Hill Street. 
7:00 p.m. International Folk Dancing. The Ark, East 

Campus. 
7:00 p.m. E.I.T. Lecture Series in Mathematics. 

Auditorium, Engineering Building. 



8:15 p.m. Student Union Major Speakers Symposium. 

Emphasis: The South. Topic: "Southern Politics." 

Music Room, East Duke Building. 
8:15—9:30 p.m. West Campus Swimming Pool open to 

faculty members and their families. Faculty children 

will be admitted only when accompanied by their 

parents. 



Tuesday, March 11 

10:00 a.m. Divinity School Chapel Service. University 

Chapel. Speaker: Dr. W.D. Davies. Reader: Mr. Bob 

Grigsby. 
10:00 a.m. Duke Law Forum: Judge Tim Murphy. Law 

School Courtroom. 
1:00 p.m. Botany Seminar. Auditorium, Biological 

Sciences Building. Speaker: Dr. John E. Cantlon. 
4:15—5:30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 

faculty, staff members, and students. 
7:00-10:00 p.m. Arts and Crafts Workshop in 

Two-Dimensional Media. Room 108 Art Building. 
7:30—10:00 p.m. Scottish Country Dancing. Presbyterian 

Student Center. 
8:15 p.m. Tocqueville Society Meeting. Room 208 Flowers 

Building. Speaker: Professor Bertel M. Sparks. 



Wednesday, March 12 

10:00 a.m. Divinity School Chapel Service. University 

Chapel. Speaker: Dr. W.D. Davies. Reader: Mr. Bob 

Moore. 
10:00 a.m.-12:00 noon Campus Club Coffee. Dining 

Room, Third Floor, Duke Hospital. Speaker: Dr. W.G. 

Anlyan. 
4:15—5:30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 

faculty, staff members, and students. 
6:25—8:00 p.m. Chapel Choir Rehearsal. University 

Chapel. 
7:30 p.m. Duke-UNC National Security Policy Seminar. 

Room 130 Social Science Building. Speaker: General 

Minoru Genda. 
7:00—9:00 p.m. Open House Badminton for all men and 

women: faculty and students. East Campus 

Gymnasium. 
8:15 p.m. Arts Festival Lecture: Mr. Jay Broad. Music 

Room, East Duke Building. 



Thursday, March 13 



10:00 a.m. Divinity School Chapel Service. University 

Chapel. Speaker: Dr. Kenneth Clark. Reader: Mr. Will 

Finnin. 
4:00 p.m. Undergraduate Faculty Council Meeting. Room 

208 Flowers Building. 
4:15—5:30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 

faculty, staff members, and students. 
5:00—6:00 p.m. Dean's Hour. Hospital Amphitheater. 

Speaker: Dr. Robert B. Livingston. 
5:15 p.m. Faculty Volleyball. Card Gymnasium. 
7:00-10:00 p.m. Arts and Crafts Workshop in 

Two-Dimensional Media. Room 108 Art Building. 
8:15—9:30 p.m. West Campus Swimming Pool open to 

faculty members and their families. Faculty children 

will be admitted only when accompanied by their 

parents. 



Friday, March 14 



10:00 a.m. Divinity School Chapel Service. University 
Chapel. Special Service. 

11:00 a.m. Duke Law Forum: Senator Lee Metcalf. Law 
School Courtroom. 

12:30 p.m. Plant Ecology Seminar. Room 144 Biological 
Sciences Building. Speaker: Mr. Phil Rundel. 

3:30 p.m. Chemistry Staff Seminar. Room 130 
Psychology— Sociology Building. Speaker: Dr. William 
E. Hatfield. 

4:00 p.m. Anthropology Seminar. Room 130 Social 
Science Building. Speaker: Professor Michael D. Coe. 

4:15—5:30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. Faculty- 
daughters, ages 6 to 16, may also swim; those 10 and 
under must be accompanied by their mothers. 

7:00—9:00 p.m., Open House Badminton for all men and 
women: faculty and students. East Campus 
Gymnasium. 

8:00 p.m. Student Union Cinematic Arts Committee Film 
Series. Auditorium, Biological Sciences Building. "Easy 
Street" directed by and starring Charlie Chaplin. ' Riot 
at Columbia." The on-the-scene account of last spring's 
Columbia situation filmed by students. "Le Sang D'un 
Poete." This avant-garde 'documentary' tells of a poet 
who passes through a series of symbolic actions and 
metaphoric tableaux. 

8:15 p.m. Duke Players Performance: "Dark of the 
Moon." Page Auditorium. 

8:15 p.m. Music Recital: Duke University String Quintet. 
Music Room. East Duke Building. 



Saturday, March 15 

10:55 a.m. Duke University Radio Program "Challenges in 
Education." WDNC Durham. Mr. Dick Parks will 
discuss "The Makings of a University Theatre." 



3:00—5:00 p.m. East Campus Gymnasium: Open to 
students, faculty, and staff for recreation (swimming, 
badminton, volleyball, basketball, table tennis). 

7:00 p.m. Student Union Performing Arts Concert: 
Gordon Lightfoot, Canadian Folksinger. Baldwin 
Auditorium. 

8:15 p.m. Dul:3 Players Performance: "Dark of the 
Moon." Page Auditorium. 

8:15 p.m. Music Department Lecture: Gordon Myers. 
Music Room, East Duke Building. 

Sunday, March 16 

10:30-10:45 a.m. Carillon Recital. Mr. J. Samuel 
Hammond, University Carillonneur. 

11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship. University 
Chapel. Preacher: The Reverend Dr. Edmund A. 
Steimle, Professor of Homiletics, Union Theological 
Seminary, New York. Broadcast over Radio Station 
WDNC. 

11:25 a.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Challenges in 
Education." WCHL Chapel Hill. Dr. Joseph C. Johnson 
II will discuss "Let's Teach It Like It Is." 

4:00—6:00 p.m. International Open House. 2022 Campus 
Drive. 

7:00 and 9:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page Auditorium. 
"BEDAZZLED" with Peter Cook, Dudley Moore, 
Eleanor Bron, and Racquel Welch. "Faust story with a 
fresh, mod look in witty, crusty, comedy about fumbly 
London restaurant worker who sells soul to devil in 
exchange for becoming man of the world. But the 
bargain is comically loaded. Inventive acting, irreverent 
humor, stylish direction." - Cue. 

7:30 p.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Challenges in 
Education." WPTF Raleigh. Mr. Paul Fendt will discuss 
"Employee Training and Development." 

8:15 p.m. Senior Recital: D. Kern Holoman, Bassoon. 
Music Room, East Duke Building. 



NOTICES for the Duke University Calendar | 
should be submitted IN WRITTEN FORM to Room | 
207 Flowers Building, not later than 5:00 p.m., § 
Tuesday. Ext. 2911. | 

Published by Duke University Student Activities ¥: 
Department, Box KM, Duke Station, Durham, N.C., xj 
27706 each week when school is in session. S 
Subscriptions: $2.50 per year. Address inquiries to % 
Box KM, Duke Station, Durham, N.C. 27706. Second | 
class postage paid at Durham, N.C. 



UNIVERSITY SERVICE OF WORSHIP 

The Reverend Professor James T. Cleland, Dean of the 
Chapel, will deliver the sermon at the University Service of 
Worship on Sunday, March 9th, at 11:00 a.m. in the 
University Chapel. The sermon topic is "Saints in Allen 
Building." 



STUDENT UNION ARTS FESTIVAL 
OPERA FOR THE NON-BELIEVER 
Dr. John Clum of the English Department will present 
an informal discussion of opera Sunday, March 9th, in 
Room 108 Flowers Building at 2:00 p.m. This will be a 
discussion of Wagner's "Tristan and Isolde" as the 
apotheosis of romanticism and its affinity with the music of 
the Doors and other pop music groups. 



PHILIP JAMISON ART EXHIBITION 
DUKE UNIVERSITY ART MUSEUM 

A one man show of works by Philip Jamison, 
distinguished artist of West Chester, Pennsylvania will be 
opened to the public on Sunday afternoon, March 9th, in 
the recently completed Duke University Art Museum on 
East Campus. A gallery-reception from four until five-thirty 
in the afternoon will honor the artist and Mrs. Jamison as 
well as Mr. and Mrs. Harry L. Dalton of Charlotte, North 
Carolina whose collection of Jamison paintings comprise 
the initial nucleus of works to be shown. 

A graduate of the Philadelphia Museum of Art, Mr. 
Jamison's works are represented in major galleries, private 
collections and the White House and his list of awards and 
honors, particularly in the field of watercolor, are 
impressive. Although he works chiefly in watercolor, Mr. 
Jamison is also expert in oil painting techniques. His works 
are characterized by simplicity of composition and sincerity 
of presentation often using as subject matter his beloved 
countrysides in West Chester, Pennsylvania and Vinalhaven, 
Maine. His pictures reveal his constant search for the truths 
of nature, flowers, snowswept landscapes, calm seas and 
clear air. 

The University is particularly grateful for this fifth 
showing of works from Mr. and Mrs. Dalton's collection of 
paintings and to Mr. Jamison for augmenting the exhibition 
with a number of his privately owned works. The exhibit 
will remain on display through the month of March. 



ANNUAL FRENCH PLAY 
•'LES FEMMES SAV ANTES" 

The performance of "Les Femmes Savantes" by Moliere 
marks the thirty-third anniversary for the Department of 
Romance Language's yearly presentation for full-scale 
French drama. Except for a few years during World War II, 
the University Community has had the opportunity to 
attend these productions performed in French, all of which 
have been directed, produced and costumed by Mrs. Neal 
Dow of the Romance Language Department. The final 
performance will be held in the Music Room, East Duke 
Building at 8:15 p.m. on Sunday, March 9th. It is open to 
the public without charge. 

"Les Femmes Savantes" satirizes the blue-stockinged 
"lady intellectual" and her pretense of great knowledge. 
The cast of multiple female leads includes Vivian Klutz as 
Philaminte, Betty Rock as Belise; Julie Field as Armande; 
Sue Hamilton as Henriette; and Carol Knotts as Martine. 
The male roles will be played by Clive Wilson as Chrysale; 
George Yearling as Trissotin; Sam Wickers z&Clitandre; Ken 
Slocum as Vadius; and William Chappell asAriste. 



ZOOLOGY SEMINAR 

The Department of Zoology will hold a seminar on 
Monday, March 10th, at 4:15 p.m. in Room 111 Biological 
Sciences Building. Mr. Joel Cohen, Research Fellow, 
Harvard University, will speak on "The Structure of Food 
Webs." 

Mr. Cohen was trained as a mathematician, but he 
retains a strong interest in biological theory. His book, A 
Model of Simple Competition, is a comparative study of 
biological and economic concepts of competition and their 
mathematical models. 

Coffee and tea will be served at 4:00 p.m. 



AAUW MEETING 

The American Association of University Women, 
Durham Branch, will meet on Monday, March 10th, at the 
YWCA on Chapel Hill Street for the annual business 
meeting and election of new officers. Present officers and 
members will discuss plans for 1969-70 including the use of 
new study topics in this Branch. Dinner will be at 6: 15 p.m. 
by advance reservation only. The program will begin at 
7:00 p.m. and all members and prospective members in the 
area are encouraged to attend. 

S.U. MAJOR SPEAKERS SYMPOSIUM 
"EMPHASIS: THE SOUTH" 

"Emphasis: The South" is a symposium program 
designed to focus on the problems and assets of the area of 
the United States generally known as "The South." The 
program is designed to be educative — imparting, through 
the medium of panel and informal discussions with public 
and academic leaders, a more complete picture of Southern 
life than is generally perceived. 

The second session of "Emphasis: The South," which is 
sponsored by the Student Union Major Speakers 
Committee, will focus on Southern Politics. Designed to 
give a historical sketch of recent Southern politics and 
explore the myth of the "Solid South" and the "Southern 
Conservative," the program will also attempt to examine 
the state of political flux now present in the South and 
hypothesize on the future of Southern politics. The 
participants in the panel and informal discussions will be 
Mr. Voit Gilmore, former North Carolina State Senator and 
a principal political figure in the Sanford Administration 
and Mr. Maynard Jackson, candidate in April, 1968 for the 
democratic nomincation for the United States Senate from 
Georgia. Dr. Robert Durden, Director of Graduate Studies 
in History, will serve as moderator. The session is open to 
the public. 



DUKE LAW FORUM 

The Duke Law Forum will present two speakers in the 
Law School Courtroom during the week of March 9th. 
Judge Tim Murphy, D.C. Court of General Sessions, will 
speak on "Judicial Functioning in Urban Disorders" on 
Tuesday, March 11th, at 10:00 a.m. On Friday, March 
14th, at 11:00 a.m., Senator Lee Metcalf (D-Montana), will 
speak on "Public Utilities: The Public-Private Dispute." The 
public is invited to both lectures. 



BOTANY SEMINAR 

The Department of Botany will hold a seminar at 1:00 
p.m. on Tuesday, March 11th, in the Biological Sciences 
Auditorium. Dr. John E. Cantlon, Michigan State 
University, will speak on "Population Studies of 
Melampyrum lineare. " Dr. Cantlon is a plant ecologist with 
wide research interests. He received the doctoral degree 
from Rutgers University, and has served as Program 
Director of Environmental Biology, National Science 
Foundation. Dr. Cantlon is the President of the Ecological 
Society of America. 

TOCQUEVILLE SOCIETY MEETING 

Professor Bertel M. Sparks of the Law School will 
address the Tocqueville Society on Tuesday, March 11th, at 
8:15 p.m. in Room 208 Flowers Building. Professor Sparks' 
topic will be "The Role of a Conservative." The Tocqueville 
Society is an educational organization which endeavors to 
examine conservative philosophy as it relates to current 
discussions within all the disciplines of the liberal arts. 

CAMPUS CLUB COFFEE 

The Campus Club of Duke University will have a coffee 
on Wednesday, March 12th, from 10:00 a.m. until 12:00 
noon in the third floor dining room of Duke Hospital. Free 
parking for members of the Campus Club will be available 
that morning in the main parking lot. Hostesses from 
Alumni Affairs, Immunology and Microbiology will meet 
members at the door of the new main lobby and take them 
to the third floor dining room. 

At 10:30 a.m. Dean W.G. Anlyan will speak on "An 
Overview of the Duke University Medical Program." A 
guided tour of the Medical Center will follow. Chairmen for 
the meeting are Mrs. Roger Marshall, Mrs. Norman F. 
Conant, and Mrs. Wolfgang Joklik 

DUKE-UNC SEMINAR 
NATIONAL SECURITY POLICY 

The Duke-UNC National Security Policy Seminar 
announces a public lecture by General Minoru Genda, 
Japanese Air Self-Defense Force, on "Recovery and 
Defense Problems of Postwar Japan" in Room 139 Social 
Science Building at 7:30 p.m. on Wednesday, March 12th. 
A wartime naval aviator, General Genda was Chief of Staff 
of the Air Self-Defense Force, 1959—1962, and is now a 
member of the House of Counsellors. 

ARTS FESTIVAL LECTURE 
JAY BROAD 

The Arts Festival Committee invites the University 
Community and the general public to an o en lecture by 
Mr. Jay Broad on Wednesday, March 12th, at 8:15 p.m. in 
the Music Room, East Duke Building. Mr. Broad, co-author 
and director of "Red, White, and Maddox," will talk about 
the modern theater. He began Theatre Atlanta's 
professional company four years ago and directed 
twenty-five productions there. Mr. Broad came to Atlanta 
from off-Broadway, where he was director for Claderon's 
"Life Is a Dream" and Harry Granick's "Witches' Sabbath." 
In Atlanta he has directed "MacBird" and he has recently 
taken his latest production, "Red, White, and Maddox" to 
Broadway. 



UNDERGRADUATE FACULTY COUNCIL MEETING 

The Undergraduate Faculty Council will meet on 
Thursday, March 13th, at 4:00 p.m. in Room 208 Flowers 
Building. 

DEAN'S HOUR 

The Dean's Hour will be held on Thursday, March 13th, 
from 5:00 to 6:00 p.m. in the Hospital Amphitheater. Dr. 
Robert B. Livingston, Department of Neurosciences, 
University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, will 
speak on "Perception and Commitment." 

PLANT ECOLOGY SEMINAR 

Mr. Phil Rundel, graduate student in Botany, will 
present a seminar on "Aestival Cycles in the Water 
Relations of the Giant Sequoia Ecosystem" at the Plant 
Ecology Seminar on Friday, March 14th, at 12:30 p.m. in 
Room 144 Biological Sciences Building. 

CHEMISTRY STAFF SEMINAR 

Dr. William E. Hatfield, Department of Chemistry, 
University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, will speak at the 
Chemistry Staff Seminar on Friday, March 14th, at 3:30 
p.m. in Room 130 Psychology— Sociology Building. The 
subject of Dr. Hatfield's address will be "Magnetically 
Condensed Copper Complexes." All interested persons are 
cordially invited to attend. 

ANTHROPOLOGY SEMINAR 

Professor Michael D. Coe, Chairman, Department of 
Anthropology, Yale University, will talk on "Human 
Ecology and the Olmec Civilization" at the Anthropology 
Seminar on Friday, March 14th, at 4:00 p.m. in Room 139 
Social Science Building. 

DUKE PLAYERS PERFORMANCE 
"DARK OF THE MOON" 

The music of the North Carolina mountains and the 
supernatural "music of the spheres" will be heard in Page 
Auditorium on Friday and Saturday evenings, March 14th 
and 15th, at 8:15 p.m. when the Duke Players present 
Howard Richardson and William Berney's "Dark of the 
Moon." The play is a colorful dramatic treatment of the 
legend of "Barbara Allen," featuring a cast of 30 actors, 
singers, dancers and musicians. It tells the story of a 
witch-boy who falls in love with a mortal girl, and enters 
into a bargain with a "conjur-woman" whereby he will 
attain mortality. The fears of the local townspeople and the 
intervention of the witch-boy's former supernatural 
companions combine to bring ultimate doom to the couple. 

Described by the director, Richard Parks, as 'an exciting 
and highly theatrical evening of entertainment,' "Dark of 
the Moon" is in many respects the major Duke Players 
production of the year. It is the only play this year which is 
planned for proscenium production in Page Auditorium. In 
the design and staging of "Dark of the Moon," full 
advantage has been taken of the possibilities for visual 
spectacle which the proscenium stage offers. Designer, 
Hitoshi Sato, has created complex and imaginative settings 
which, combined with costumer, Betty Martin's designs, 
will give the production the color and flavor of the North 



Carolina mountains and their people. Original music has 
been composed by Edgar Warren Williams, and the dances 
choreographed by Lyn Clark. 

Tickets for "Dark of the Moon" are now available in the 
Page Auditorium box office at $1.50 for students, $1.75 
for members of the faculty and staff, and $2.00 for the 
general public. All seats are reserved. Reservations and 
information may be obtained by calli"" 684-4059 or 
684-3181. 

MUSIC RECITAL 
DUKE UNIVERSITY STRING QUINTET 

On Friday, March 14th, the Duke University String 
Quintet will present a recital of music for string quintet, in 
the Music Room, East Duke Building. Their varied program 
consists of music by Tomaso Albinoni, Johannes Brahms 
and Wolfgang Mozart. 

The string quintet, as an ensemble, is greatly 
overshadowed by the string quartet, and perhaps unjustly. 
There have been some imcomparable masterpieces written 
for quintet, especially those of Mozart, which are just not 
heard enough because of the scarcity of string quintets to 
play them. Duke University is indeed fortunate to have 
such an ensemble. They have recently played in Raleigh at 
the Governor's Mansion. 

The members are Patricia Cranford and Helen 
Fruitstone, violins; Phillip Magnuson and Elizabeth Schulta, 
viola; and Gary Hardie, 'cello. The program follows: 

Sonata a cinque in G Minor Albinoni 

Opus 2, No. 6 
Adagio 
Allegro 
Grave 
A llegro 

Chorale Prelude Brahms 

"Es istein Ros'entsprungen" 

String Quintet in C Minor, K. 406 Mozart 

A llegro 
Andante 
Menuetto 
Allegro 

String Quintet in G Minor, K. 516 Mozart 

Allegro 

Menuetto (Allegretto) 
Adagio, ma non troppo 
Adagio - Allegro 

AMERICAN MUSICOLOGICAL SOCIETY 
GUEST LECTURERS 

The American Musicological Society, Southeastern 
Chapter, will meet on Saturday, March 15th, at Hill Hall, 
University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. Two prominent 
guest speakers will present lectures which are sponsored 
jointly by the Music Departments of Duke University and 
the University of North Carolina. Eva Badura-Skoda will 
speak on "Musica Bernesca, The Viennese Singspiel, and 
Joseph Haydn" at 11:00 a.m. At 2:00 p.m., Paul Henry 
Lang will speak on "Opera and Revolution." 

Eva Badura-Skoda, a native of Austria, is presently 
Professor of Music at the University of Wisconsin and has 
published extensively on performance practices of the 



Haydn-Mozart period. Her editions of cadenzas for a 
number of Mozart's piano concertos and her book 
Mozart-Interpretation (Vienna, 1957) were written in 
collaboration with her husband, the well-known concert 
pianist Paul Badura-Skoda. 

Paul Henry Lang, since 1933 Professor of Musicology at 
Columbia University, was for decades a feared and much 
acclaimed arbiter as the first music critic of the New York 
Herald Tribune. He was editor of and frequent contributor 
to the Musical Quarterly; from 1955 to 1958 Professor 
Lang was President of the International Musicological 
Society. He is known to a broad international public 
through his Music in Western Civilization (New York, 
1941), a book which is credited to have done more thann 
any other to establish music as a humanistic discipline at 
American universities and was translated into many 
languages, including Czech and Japanese. His recent, 
monumental George Frideric Handel (New York, 1966) 
revolutionized our traditional knowledge of Handel the 
"churchman" in favor of the dramatist. 

STUDENT UNION FOLK CONCERT 
GORDON LIGHTFOOT 

Canada's Gordon Lightfoot will be presented in a 
program of folk music at 7:00 p.m. in Baldwin Auditorium 
on Saturday evening, March 15th. This popular young 
singer is Canada's top-selling male singer and is presently 
being "discovered" in the United States. The Performing 
Arts Committee of the Student Union announces ticket 
sales for this concert in Page Box Office; for Duke students 
$2.00 and for all others $2.50. 

Mr. Lightfoot is an exciting performer and a first-rate 
music composer. His songs are performed by such singers as 
Harry Belafonte and Peter, Paul and Mary. His assured 
straightforward delivery shows him to be that rarity in the 
folk field, a well-schooled singer. As he puts it, "Musically 
I'm the product of a sophisticated background, yet my 
songs are basic and simple. I hope to be known as a 
cosmopolitan hick." 

GORDON MYERS MUSILOGUE 

Gordon Myers, Baritone, will present a Musilogue of his 
experiences as a "singer on tour" while a member of the 
New York Pro Musica, Randolph Singers, and during four 
years of service in World War II. Dr. Myers interestingly 
combines comments, slides, and musical illustrations with 
colorful individuality and the insights of a keenly observant 
professional. 

This event is sponsored by the Department of Music and 
will be held in the Music Room, East Duke Building on 
Saturday, March 15th, at 8:15 p.m. The public is cordially 
invited to attend and there is no admission charge. 

Dr. Myers is presently Associate Professor of Music at 
Trenton State College in Trenton, New Jersey. During his 
visit he will also appear as soloist with the Durham Civic 
Choral Society. 

SENIOR RECITAL 
D. KERN HOLOMAN 

The Department of Music will present D. Kern Holoman 
in a bassoon recital on Sunday evening, March 16th, at 8: 15 
p.m. in the Music Room, East Duke Building. The soloist 



will be accompanied by John Newell, pianist, (class of '71) 
and a chamber orchestra of members of the Duke 
Symphony. James Weber, first flutist of the Duke 
Symphony, will appear as flute soloist. 

A native of Raleigh, Mr. Holoman is a Senior major in 
Music and has studied bassoon with James Henry for five 
years. He is a member of Phi Beta Kappa, Delta Mu Tau 
(Duke music honorary fraternity), and is a Woodrow Wilson 
Fellowship designate. He has appeared as soloist with the 
Duke Symphony Orchestra and Concert Band, in addition 
to appearing as guest conductor of both groups. Currently 
Mr. Holoman is the President of the Duke Concert Band 
and plans graduate work in music. 

The program follows: 

Concerto in F Major Vivaldi 

for Bassoon, Strings, and Cembalo 
Allegro 
Largo 
A llegro 

Bachianas Brasileiras No. 6 Villa-Lobos 

for Flute and Bassoon 
Aria (Choro); Largo 
Fantasia; Allegro 

Solo de Concert, Opus 35 Pierness 

Fantaisie for Bassoon and Piano Bozza 

Lent-Andantino-Scherzando 

Sonata for Bassoon and Piano Etler 

Moderately slow 
Fast 
Slow 
Fast 

YM-YWCA CONFERENCE 
THE DRAFT: SENTENCE OR SERVICE? 

David Harris, Joan Baez, and Father Canane, a member 
of the "Milwaulkee 14," along with other guest speakers, 
will head a three-day conference on the Draft. The purpose 
of this conference is to inform students and faculty about 
the Selective Service System and the opposition it has 
created in the United States today. Discussion in formal 
addresses and seminars will range from individual moral 
responses to the Draft, to women's response to the Draft, 
Draft counselling, deferments, and conscientious 
participation. Specific times and places will be publicized a 
few days in advance of the opening of the conference. It is 
being sponsored by the Duke YM— YWCA. 



STUDENT UNION ART EXHIBITION 
PICASSO: CERAMICS AND GRAPHICS 

Two examples of Picasso's excursions into the diverse 
minor arts — ceramics and graphics — are on view in the 
Gallery area of the West Union Building from March 
2nd— 23rd through the exhibition program of the Student 
Union's Graphic Arts Committee. Picasso Arts, Inc., New 
York City, has lent twenty-seven ceramics and twelve 
graphics for the exhibition entitled, "Picasso: Ceramics and 
Graphics," which is circulating throughout the United 



States and Canada under the auspices of The American 
Federation of Arts. 

Picasso began to work in the ceramic medium after 
moving to the south of France in 1946. In the little town of 
Vallauris, a dying earthenware manufacturing center, he 
began his work, collaborating with Suzanne and Georges 
Ramie who operated the Madoura studio there. He was 
attracted to the medium because he could combine both 
the sculptural qualities of clay and the illusory aspects of 
overpainting; and also, since the ceramic ware was always 
fired, the colors would not fade, and the original intent of 
the artist would remain to the viewer. 

These ceramics fall into two categories: Empreinte 
Original de Picasso and Editions Picasso. In the first, Picasso 
works in the negative with a wet mold, carving the design 
into the surface; the cast reproduces the object in reverse. 
In the Edition, the artist works in the positive, creating the 
design exactly as it will be viewed. From this a mold is 
made, the incisions following the original and indicating 
where the color is to be applied. All the editions are limited 
and, though Picasso does not cast or paint the editions, he 
examines and approves each finished piece. 

Picasso learned the technique of lithography in Fernand 
Mourlot's studio in Paris. After moving to the south of 
France he continued to make lithographs with zinc plates 
and stones sent him by Mourlot. He also made linoleum 
cuts and estampes. Impressions are made by printers in 
Vallauris under the direction of M. Arnera. Picasso 
supervises. 

ANNE FLEXNER AWARD 
FOR CREATIVE WRITING 

The Anne Flexner Memorial Award is offered annually 
for the best piece of creative writing submitted by an 
undergraduate student at Duke University. The First Prize 
is $150.00 and Second Prize is $75.00. The conditions are 
as follows: (1) The prize is open to all undergraduates, both 
men and women. (2) Only short stories (7500-word limit), 
one-act plays (7500-word limit), poems (200-line limit), 
and informal essays (5000-word limit) are eligible. (3) Only 
one manuscript may be submitted by any contestant. (4) 
All manuscripts must be typed double spaced and must be 
delivered to the English Office (325 Allen Building) by 
April 15. The author's name and address must appear 
nowhere except on a separate sheet placed before the 
manuscript. (5) At the judges' discretion, the prize may be 
split equally between a winning prose and a winning poetry 
entry. 

•x DUKE ARTISTS SERIES 

% CLIFFORD CURZON RECITAL 

% The Committee of the Duke Artists Series 
:•:• expresses regret at the postponement of the Clifford 
& Curzon recital on Wednesday, March 5th because of 
:£ .llness. It is hoped that an alternate date will be 
S: available. Announcement of this date will be carried 
::•:• in the Calendar and the daily papers. 
&:W:?xW:*:*:*ffi^ 






Duke University 

CALENDAR- 




Mar. 16-23, 1969 



Volume 69 



Published Mar. 14, 1969 



Number 11 



Sunday, March 16 



10 



11 



11 



30—10:45 a.m. Carillon Recital. Mr. J. Samuel 
Hammond, University Carillonneur. 
00 a.m. University Service of Worship. University 
Chapel. Preacher: The Reverend. Dr. Thomas 
Langford, Chairman, Department of Religion. 
Broadcast over Radio Station WDNC. 
25 a.m. Duke University Radio Program, ' Challenges in 
Education." WCHL Chapel Hill. Dr. Joseph C. Johnson 
II will discuss "Let's Teach It Like It Is." 

3:00—5:00 p.m. East Campus Gymnasium: Open to 
students, faculty, and staff for recreation (swimming, 
badminton, volleyball, basketball, table tennis). 

4:00—6:00 p.m. International Open House. 2022 Campus 
Drive. 

4:00—6:30 p.m. U.C.M. Supper Meeting. Westminster 
House. 

5:30 p.m. U.C.M. Meeting. Richard Jackson Residence. 
2634 Pickett Road. 

7:00 and 9:15 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page Auditorium. 
"HENRY V" (British) with Laurence Olivier, Leslie 
Banks, and Max Adrian. "Stunningly brilliant and 
intriguing screen spectacle, rich in theatrical invention, 
in heroic imagery, and also gracully regardful of the 
conventions of the Elizabethan stage." -- Crowther, 
N. Y. Times. Voted "Best Film" of its year. In color. 

7:30 p.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Challenges in 
Education." WPTF Raleigh. Mr. Paul Fendt will discuss 
"Employee Training and Development." 

8:15 p.m. Senior Recital: D. Kern Holoman, Bassoon. 
Music Room, East Duke Building. 

Monday, March 17 

9:00 am. The final examination of Mr. Charles Floyd 

Ward for the Ph.D. degree in Education. Room 08A 

West Duke Building. 
3:00 p.m. Chemistry Staff Seminar. Room 147 Medical 

Sciences Building. Speaker: Dr. Harry Rosenberg. 
4:00 p.m. Anthropology Seminar. Room 130 

Psychology— Sociology Building. Speaker: Dr. Terence 

Turner. 
4:15 p.m. Zoology Seminar. Room 111 Biological Sciences 

Building. Speaker: Professor Rheinhold R. Hofmann. 
4:15—5:30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 

faculty, staff members, and students. 
5:15 p.m. Faculty Volleyball. Card Gymnasium. 



7:00 p.m. International Folk Dancing. The Ark, East 
Campus. 

8:00 p.m. Student Union Major Speakers Symposium. 
Emphasis: The South. Topic: "Social and Cultural 
Institutions." Union Ballroom, West Campus. 

8:15—9:30 p.m. West Campus Swimming Pool open to 
faculty members and their families. Faculty children 
will be admitted only when accompanied by their 
parents. 

Tuesday, March 18 

10:00 a.m. Divinity School Chapel Service. University 

Chapel. Speaker: Dean O. Kelly Ingram. Reader: Mr. 

Rutledge Sheridan. 
4:00 p.m. Gerontology Seminar. Room 1504 Gerontology 

Building, Duke Hospital. Speaker: Dr. Barnes 

Woodhall. 
4:15—5:30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 

faculty, staff members, and students. 
7:00 p.m. E.I.T. Lecture Series in Chemistry. Auditorium, 

Engineering Building. 
7:00-10:00 p.m. Arts and Crafts Workshop in 

Two-Dimensional Media. Room 108 Art Building. 
7:30—10:00 p.m. Scottish Country Dancing. Presbyterian 

Student Center. 
8:15 p.m. Durham Civic Choral Society Spring Concert. 

Page Auditorium. 



Wednesday, March 19 

10:00 a.m. Divinity School Chapel Service. University 

Chapel. Speaker: Dr. Donald Shriver. Reader: Mr. Russ 

Martin. 
4:00 p.m. Psychology Colloquium. Karl Zener Auditorium, 

Room 130 Psychology— Sociology Building. Speaker: 

Dr. Saul Steinberg. 
4:15—5:30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 

faculty, staff members, and students. 
6:25—8:00 p.m. Chapel Choir Rehearsal. University 

Chapel. 
7:00—9:00 p.m. Open House Badminton for all men and 

women: faculty and students. East Campus 

Gymnasium. 
8:15 p.m. Duke Artists Series Presents "The Harkness 

Ballet." Page Auditorium. 



Thursday, March 20 

10:00 a.m. Divinity School Chapel Service. University 

Chapel. Special Service. 
12:30 p.m. Kappa Delta Pi Luncheon Meeting. East 

Campus Union. Speaker: Dr. Michael Wallach. 
3:00 p.m. Lacrosse: Duke vs. Ohio Wesleyan. Lacrosse 

Field near Indoor Stadium. 
4:00 p.m. Academic Council Meeting. Room 208 Flowers 

Building. 
4:15—5:30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 

faculty, staff members, and students. 
5:00—6:00 p.m. Dean's Hour. Hospital Amphitheater. 

Speaker: Mr. Tom Wicker. 
5:15 p.m. Faculty Volleyball. Card Gymnasium. 
7:00-10:00 p.m. Arts and Crafts Workshop in 

Two-Dimensional Media. Room 108 Art Building. 
8:00 p.m. Graduate English Club Lecture. Room 130 

Psychology— Sociology Building. Speaker: Professor 

W.K. Wimsatt, Jr. 
8:00 p.m. Duke— UNC East Asia Colloquium Alumni 

Room, East Duke Building. Speaker: Professor Franz 

Schurmann. 
8:00 p.m. Newcomers Club Meeting. Dining Room, 

Gilbert- A ddoms Dormitory. Speaker: Mr. Frank 

Ashmore. 
8:15—9:30 p.m. West Campus Swimming Pool open to 

faculty members and their families. Faculty children 

will be admitted only when accompanied by their 

parents. 

Friday, March 21 

10:00 a.m. Divinity School Chapel Service. University 

Chapel. Speaker: Mr. John Walker. 
1:00 p.m. The final examination of Mr. Edward Bleakley 

King for the Ph.D. degree in History. Room 325 

Perkins Library. 
2:00 p.m. The final examination of Mr. Herbert Edward 

Spivey for the Ph.D. degree in English. Room 328 

Allen Building. 
3:30 p.m. The final examination of Mr. George Chester 

Bedell for the Ph.D. degree in Religion. Room 210 

Divinity School. 
4:15—5:30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 

faculty, staff members, and students. Faculty 

daughters, ages 6 to 16, may also swim; those 10 and 

under must be accompanied by their mothers. 
5:45 p.m. U.C.M. Meeting. Westminster House. 
7:00—9:00 p.m. Open House Badminton for all men and 

women: faculty and students. East Campus 

Gymnasium 



Saturday, March 22 

10:55 a.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Challenges in 
Education." WDNC Durham. Dr. Joseph C. Johnson II 
will discuss "Let's Teach It Like It Is." 

12:30 p.m. Spring Recess Begins. (Classes resume Monday, 
March 31 at 8:10 a.m) 



3:00—5:00 p.m. East Campus Gymnasium: Open to 
students, faculty, and staff for recreation (swimming, 
badminton, volleyball, basketball, table tennis). 

8:15 p.m. The Chamber Arts Society Presents The Fine 
Arts String Quartet. Music Room, East Duke Building. 

N.B. No Quadrangle Pictures. Next showing April 5 & 6. 

Sunday, March 23 

10:30-10:45 a.m. Carillon Recital. Mr. J. Samuel 

Hammond, University Carillonneur. 
11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship. University 

Chapel. Preacher: The Reverend R. Wesley Aitken, 

Chaplain to the Medical Center. Broadcast over Radio 

Station WDNC. 
11:25 a.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Challenges in 

Education." WCHL Chapel Hill. Dr. Ben Younger will 

discuss "Pregnancy and the Immunity Response 

Puzzle." 
3:00—5:00 p.m. East Campus Gymnasium: Open to 

students, faculty, and staff for recreation (swimming, 

badminton, volleyball, basketball, table tennis. 
4:00—6:00 p.m. International Open House. 2022 Campus 

Drive. 
7:30 p.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Challenges in 

Education." WPTF Raleigh. Mr. Dick Parks will discuss 

"The Makings of a University Theater." 



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NOTICES for the Duke University Calendar 1 
| should be submitted IN WRITTEN FORM to Room 

1 207 Flowers Building, not later than 5:00 p.m.. I 
| Tuesday. Ext. 2911. 

Published by Duke University Student Activities 1 
| Department, Box KM, Duke Station, Durham, N.C., 

27706 each week when school is in session. § 

| Subscriptions: $2.50 per year. Address inquiries to 1 

| Box KM, Duke Station, Durham, N.C. 27706. Second | 

| class postage paid at Durham, N.C. I 



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UNIVERSITY SERVICE OF WORSHIP 

The Reverend Dr. Thomas Langford, Chairman, 
Department of Religion, will deliver the sermon at the 
University Service of Worship on Sunday, March 16th, at 
11:00 a.m. in the University Chapel. 



UCM MEETINGS 

The Westminster Fellowship and the United Campus 
Christian Fellowship, nurture groups of the University 
Christian Movement, will meet Sunday evening, March 16th 
with a group from NCC to discuss "Black 
Identity— Christian Identity: Are They Exclusive?" Rides 
will leave from the East Campus circle at 5:30 p.m. for the 
home of the Richard Jackson's, 2634 Pickett Road. 






The Westminster Fellowship and the United Campus 
Christian Fellowship will meet for dinner, worship and 
discussion at 5:45 p.m. on Friday, March 21st, in the 
Westminster House on Alexander Avenue. 

A gathering of the total UCM community will be held 
Sunday, March 16th, from 4:00—6:00 p.m. at Westminster 
House on Alexander Avenue. Supper will be served. 

SENIOR RECITAL 
D. KERN HOLOMAN 

The Department of Music will present D. Kern Holoman 
in a bassoon recital on Sunday evening, March 16th, at 8: 15 
p.m. in the Music Room, East Duke Building. The soloist 
will be accompanied by John Newell, pianist, (class of '71) 
and a chamber orchestra of members of the Duke 
Symphony. James Weber, first flutist of the Duke 
Symphony, will appear as flute soloist. 

A native of Raleigh, Mr. Holoman is a Senior major in 
Music and has studied bassoon with James Henry for five 
years. He is a member of Phi Beta Kappa, Delta Mu Tau 
(Duke music honorary fraternity), and is a Woodrow Wilson 
Fellowship designate. He has appeared as soloist with the 
Duke Symphony Orchestra and Concert Band, in addition 
to appearing as guest conductor of both groups. Currently 
Mr. Holoman is the President of the Duke Concert Band 
and plans graduate work in music. 

The program follows: 

Concerto in F Major Vivaldi 

for Bassoon, Strings, and Cembalo 
Allegro 
Largo 
Allegro 

Bachianas Brasileiras No. 6 Villa-Lobos 

for Flute and Bassoon 
Aria (Choro); Largo 
Fantasia; Allegro 

Solo de Concert, Opus 35 Pierness 

Fantaisie for Bassoon and Piano Bozza 

Lent-Andantino-Scherzando 

Sonata for Bassoon and Piano Etler 

Moderately slow 
Fast 
Slow 
Fast 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. Charles Floyd Ward for the 
Ph.D. degree in Education will be held on Monday, March 
17th, at 9:00 a.m. in Room 08A West Duke Building. The 
subject of Mr. Ward's dissertation is "An Analysis of 
Selected Legal and Operational Differences Among Public 
Two-Year College Systems." The committee to conduct the 
examination consists of Professors Allan S. Hurlburt, 
Joseph Di Bona, William G. Katzenmeyer, David V. Martin, 
and Hugh M. Hall. Professor Hurlburt will preside. 



CHEMISTRY STAFF SEMINAR 

Dr. Harry Rosenberg, Department of Biochemistry, The 
John Curtin School of Medical Research, The Australian 
National University, Canberra City, Australia, will speak at 
the Chemistry Staff Seminar on Monday, March 17 th, at 
3:00 p.m. in Room 147 Medical Sciences BuUding. The 
subject of Dr. Rosenberg's address will be "Phosphonate 
Metabolism in Microorganisms." All interested persons are 
cordially invited to attend. 



ANTHROPOLOGY SEMINAR 

Dr. Terence Turner, Department of Anthropology, 
University of Chicago, will speak on "The Structuralist 
Approach to Ritual and Myth: A Critique and 
Reformulation of Problems and Concepts" at the 
Anthropology Seminar. The seminar will be held at 4:00 
p.m. on Monday, March 17th, in Room 130 
Psychology— Sociology Building. 



ZOOLOGY SEMINAR 

The Department of Zoology will hold a seminar on 
Monday, March 17th, at 4:15 p.m. in Room 111 Biological 
Sciences Building. Coffee and tea will be served at 4:00 
p.m. Professor Rheinhold R. Hofmann, Professor of 
Veterinary Anatomy, University College, Nairobi, Kenya, 
and a Visiting Scholar, Department of Anatomy, Harvard 
University Medical School, will speak on the "Structure and 
Function of the Ruminant Stomach in Relation to Feeding 
Habits." 

More than 30 species of ruminants live in East Africa. 
The stomachs of these beasts differ widely; from simple 
sacs with relatively smooth walls to complex structures 
lined with various types of papillae which form intricate 
geometric designs. During the past six years, Professor 
Hofmann has spent much of his time trying to make 
functional sense out of these structural differences. 



S.U. MAJOR SPEAKERS SYMPOSIUM 
"EMPHASIS: THE SOUTH" 

"Emphasis: The South" is a symposium program 
designed to focus on the problems and assets of the area of 
the United States generally known as "The South." The 
program is designed to be educative — imparting, through 
the medium of panel and informal discussions with public 
and academic leaders, a more complete picture of Southern 
life than is generally perceived. 

The third and final session of "Emphasis: The South," 
which is sponsored by the Student Union Major Speakers 
Committee, will focus on the cultural and social institutions 
of the South. The past, present, and future roles of race 
relations, the plantation system, the Church, Appalachia, 
etc. in the cultural existence of the South will be the 
principal areas to be examined. The participants in the 
panel and informal discussions will be Dr. Edgar T. 
Thompson, Department of Sociology, and Director of the 
Center for Southern Studies; Mr. Finley Campbell, formerly 
an instructor of English at Morehouse College, Atlanta, 
Georgia, now engaged in establishing a Black Studies 



Program at Wabash College; and Mr. John Hampton, the 
State Planning Task Force Officer and former Director of 
the Appalachian Regional Commission. Dr. Robert S. 
Rankin of the Political Science Department and member of 
the United States Civil Rights Commission will serve as 
moderator. The session will be at 8:00 p.m. on Monday, 
March 17th, in the Union Ballroom, West Campus and is 
open to the public. 



GERONTOLOGY SEMINAR 
DR. BARNES WOODHALL 

The Duke University Council on Aging and Human 
Development will present Barnes Woodhall, M.D., Professor 
of Neurosurgery and recently appointed Chancellor Pro-tem 
at a seminar on Tuesday, March 18th, at 4:00 p.m. in 
Room 1504 Gerontology Building, Duke Hospital. 

Formerly Dean of the Medical School and Associate 
Provost for Medical Affairs, Dr. Woodhall will speak on 
"What Price Longevity: For Society? For the Individual?" 
The public is invited to attend this open seminar. 



DURHAM CIVIC CHORAL SOCIETY 
ANNUAL SPRING CONCERT 

The annual spring concert of the Durham Civic Choral 
Society will be given on Tuesday evening, March 18th, at 
8:15 p.m. in Page Auditorium. Featuring a choral ensemble 
of 95 voices, accompanied by 60 members of the Duke 
Symphony, under the direction of Allan Bone, the program 
will be the Mass in G by Franz Schubert, and the famous 
"secular cantata," Carmina Burana, by the contemporary 
Carl Orff. The concert is open to the public without charge. 
A reception for choral members, orchestra, and friends will 
be held in Flowers Lounge after the concert. 

Soloists will be Mrs. Joan Schultz of Chapel Hill, Mr. 
Michael Best, former Duke student, and graduate of the 
Juilliard School in New York, and Mr. Gordon Myers, 
formerly soloist with the New York Pro Musica, and 
currently Associate Professor of Music, Trenton State 
College. 



PSYCHOLOGY COLLOQUIUM 

The Department of Psychology will hold a colloquium 
on Wednesday, March 19th, at 4:00 p.m. in the Karl Zener 
Memorial Auditorium, Room 130 Psychology— Sociology 
Building. Dr. Saul Steinberg, Department of Psychology, 
Bell Laboratories, will speak on "On Scanning One's 
Memory." 



DUKE ARTISTS SERIES 
"HARKNESS BALLET" 

The Duke Artists Series will present a performance by 
the vibrantly young Harkness Ballet on Wednesday, March 
19th, at 8:15 p.m. in Page Auditorium. A few tickets priced 
at $2.75 and $2.25 remain available for this program in 
Page Box Office. 



The Rebekah Harkness Foundation was established in 
1961 to encourage and promote the great traditions of 
classical ballet and press forward into new frontiers of 
dance sponsoring fresh approaches to dance techniques, 
choreography, musical composition and design. 

The brilliant young company is under almost entirely 
new management with the remarkable Lawrence Rhodes, 
one of the principal dancers, as artistic director replacing 
George Skibine. One of the most amazing aspects of the 
Harkness Ballet is that it has mounted over fifty ballets 
since its first public performances in Cannes nearly four 
years ago — a record probably no dance company in the 
world can match. Under Rhodes' pruning eighteen works 
were shown in the recent New York three-week season at 
the Music Box. 

The Duke performance will open with the recently 
premiered Benjamin Harkavy's Madrigalesco created by the 
Netherlands Dance Theater followed by Monument for a 
Dead Boy, choreographed by Rudi Van Dantzig to the 
electronic music of Jan Boerman and scenery and costumes 
by Toer Van Schuyk. Next comes the Sylvia Pas de Deux, a 
revival staged by Andre Eglevsky set to music from the 
19th-century Delibes ballet which gives opportunity for 
show-stopping virtuosity of classical brilliance. The final 
number will be Time Out of Mind, choreographed by Brian 
MacDonald to the music of Paul Creston and scenery and 
costume design by Touben Ter-Arutunian. Mr. MacDonald 
has sought to combine the reckless pace of contemporary 
times with the primitive, almost ritualistic movements that 
characterize ancient dance. 

Duke is privileged to see these amazing young dancers 
who have received extravagent accolades from critics and 
audiences alike. Clive Barnes asserts that the company has 
"marvelous dancers — among the most beautiful and 
elegant around- charmers no less." 



KAPPA DELTA PI LUNCHEON MEETING 

On Thursday, March 20th, at 12:30 p.m. Kappa Delta 
Pi, Education Honorary, will hold its monthly meeting in 
the East Campus Union. Dr. Michael Wallach, Department 
of Psychology, will speak on "Creativity in Education." 

ACADEMIC COUNCIL MEETING 

The Academic Council will meet at 4:00 p.m. on 
Thursday, March 20th, in Room 208 Flowers Building. 



DEAN'S HOUR 

The Dean's Hour will be held on Thursday, March 20th, 
from 5:00 to 6:00 p.m. in the Hospital Amphitheater. Mr. 
Tom Wicker, Associate Editor, The New York Times, 
Washington, D.C., will speak on "A New Generation." 

GRADUATE ENGLISH CLUB LECTURE 

W.K. Wimsatt, Jr., Frederick Clifford Ford Professor of 
English at Yale University, will lecture on "Imitation as 
Freedom: 1717-1798" at the Graduate English Club 
Meeting on Thursday, March 20th, at 8:00 p.m. in Room 
130 Psychology— Sociology Building. The author of 



t 



Philosophic Words, The Prose Style of Samuel Johnson, and 
The Verbal Icon, Professor Wimsatt is a distinguished 
scholar of Eighteenth Century English literature. The public 
is cordially invited to attend. 



DUKE-UNC EAST ASIA COLLOQUIUM 

Dr. Franz Schurmann, Professor of Sociology and 
History at the University of California at Berkeley, and a 
leading authority on Communist China, will give a talk on 
"The United States and the Soviet Union in Communist 
China's Domestic and Foreign Policy Decision." The talk 
will be held at 8:00 p.m., Thursday evening, March 20th, in 
the Alumni Room, East Duke Building. All interested 
persons are invited. 



NEWCOMERS CLUB MEETING 

Newcomers Club will meet in the dining room of 
Gilbert-Addoms Dormitory on Thursday, March 20th, at 
8:00 p.m. to hear Mr. Frank Ashmore, Vice President, 
Institutional Advancement, speak on "The University and 
Its Publics." Campus Club members, husbands, and guests 
are invited to attend. Mrs. Dallas Finnell is in charge of this 
program. 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. Edward Bleakley King for 
the Ph.D. degree in History will be held on Friday, March 
21st, at 1:00 p.m. in Room 325 Perkins Library. The 
subject of Mr. King's dissertation is "Robert Grosseteste 
and the Pastoral Office." The committee to conduct the 
examination consists of Professors Hans Hillerbrand, Harold 
Parker, Ray Petry, and Charles Young. Professor Young will 
preside. 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. Herbert Edward Spivey for 
the Ph.D. degree in English will be held on Friday, March 
21st at 2:00 p.m. in Room 328 Allen Building. The subject 
of Mr. Spivey's dissertation is "Carlyle and Mill on the 
Individual in Society." The committee to conduct the 
examination consists of Professors C. Richard Sanders, 
Lionel Stevenson, Lewis Patton, and Paul Welsh. Professor 
Sanders will preside. 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. George Chester Bedell for 
the Ph.D. degree in Religion will be held on Friday, March 
21st, at 3:30 p.m. in Room 210 Divinity School. The 
subject of Mr. Bedell's dissertation is "Kierkegaard and 
Faulkner: Modalities of Existence." The committee to 
conduct the examination consists of Professors William 
Poteat, Waldo Beach, Stuart Henry, and Weldon Thornton. 
Professor Poteat will preside. 



CHAMBER ARTS SOCIETY 
FINE ARTS STRING QUARTET 

The final concert of the Chamber Arts Society series will 
be given by the Fine Arts String Quartet on Saturday, 
March 22nd, at 8:15 p.m. in the Music Room, East Duke 
Building. There will be a limited number of tickets priced at 
$2.50 available at the door beginning at 7:30 p.m. The 
Quartet is composed of Leonard Sorkin, violin; Bernard 
Zaslav, viola; Abram Loft, violin; and George Sopkin, cello. 
The program follows: 

Quartet in G major, Opus 76, No. 1 Hadyn 

Third Quartet (1 927) Bartok 

Quartet in A minor, Opus 51, No. 2 Brahms 



N.C. SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
CHILDRENS' CONCERTS 



Duke Indoor Stadium will fill twice on Monday, March 
17th, as approximately ten thousand Durham City and 
County elementary students gather to hear the North 
Carolina Symphony give its annual educational matinee 
concerts, the last concerts to be given by the full 
Symphony this season. 

Given admission-free, the concerts are being sponsored 
by the more than 600 members of the Durham Chapter of 
the N.C. Symphony Society, Inc. through the purchase of 
season membership tickets. Grades three— six from the 
county schools will attend the morning concert, and grades 
four— six from the city schools will attend in the afternoon. 
As usual the Symphony Director, Benjamin Swalin, will 
conduct, and Mrs. Swalin, coordinator of the state-wide 
educational program, will serve as narrator. 

The concerts are part of a statewide experiment in music 
education begun by Dr. Swalin in 1943. Several other 
symphony orchestra offer equally sophisticated educational 
programs; however, none, according to records readily 
available, offers a program with as great a geographic range 
as that of the North Carolina Symphony. Last year, in the 
67 communities where these special live concerts were 
given, the Symphony engaged the attention of over 
160,000 children at admission-free educational matinees. 

The concerts are carefully planned using short selections 
which vary in mood, and at least one piece which calls for 
audience participation. At the Monday concerts, students 
will participate by singing, as the orchestra plays, Woody 
Guthrie's Roll On, Columbia and an old Russian tune, 
Vesper Hymn. Four other selections will also be heard: 
Haydn's Symphony No. 88 in G Major; Mississippi Suite by 
Ferde Grofe; LeRoy Anderson's Sandpaper Ballet; and 
excerpts from The Firebird Suite by Stravinsky. 

For the past several weeks, students have been preparing 
for the Symphony's arrival with classroom studies. To aid 
the teachers with this preparation, records, booklets, and 
other materials are made available through the Symphony 
offices in Chapel Hill. In addition, workshops are 
conducted annually across the state to help teachers plan 
their pre-concert instruction. 



MATHEMATICS FILM SERIES 

The Department of Mathematics is sponsoring a film 
series this spring. The films will be shown at 2:00 p.m. in 
Room 114 Physics Building. A schedule of the films is as 
follows: 



Date 


Title 


Lecturer 


Mar. 11 


Who Killed Determinants? 


K.O. May 


Mar. 18 


Measure and Set Theory 


S. Ulam 


Apr. 8 


Nim and Other Oriented 
Graph Games 


A.M. Gleason 


Apr. 15 


John von Neumann 




Apr. 22 


to be announced 




Apr. 29 


Challenging Conjectures 


R.H. Bing 



ANNE FLEXNER MEMORIAL AWARD 
FOR CREATIVE WRITING 

The Anne Flexner Memorial Award is offered annually 
for the best piece of creative writing submitted by an 
undergraduate student at Duke University. The First Prize 
is $150.00 and Second Prize is $75.00. The conditions are 
as follows: (1) The prize is open to all undergraduates, both 
men and women. (2) Only short stories (7500-word limit), 
one-act plays (7500-word limit), poems (200-line limit), 
and informal essays (5000-word limit) are eligible. (3) Only 
one manuscript may be submitted by any contestant. (4) 
All manuscripts must be typed double spaced and must be 
delivered to the English Office (325 ^ Hen Building) by 
April 15. The author's name and address must appear 
nowhere except on a separate sheet placed before the 
manuscript. (5) At the judges' discretion, the prize may be 
split equally between a winning prose and a winning poetry 
entry. 



DUKE UNIVERSITY LIBRARY SCHEDULE 
SPRING VACATION MARCH 22-31 



Perkins Library 



Saturday, March 22 
Sunday, March 23 
Mon., Mar. 24-Fri., Mar. 28 
Saturday, March 29 
Sunday, March 30 
Monday, March 31 



8:00 a.m.-l:00 p.m. 

Closed 
8:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. 
8:00 a.m.-l:00 p.m. 

Closed 
Resume regular schedule 



Woman's College Library 



Saturday, March 22 
Sunday, March 23 
Mon., Mar. 24— Fri., Mar. 28 
Saturday, March 29 
Sunday, March 30 
Monday, March 31 



8:00 a.m.-l:00 p.m. 

Closed 
8:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. 
8:00 a.m.-l:00 p.m. 

Closed 
Resume regular schedule 



DINING HALL SCHEDULE 
SPRING VACATION 

The University Room will close after lunch and the Oak 
Room after dinner on Friday, March 21st, and will reopen 
for lunch on Monday, March 31st. 

The Cambridge Inn will close after Friday evening, 
March 21st, and will reopen on Sunday evening, March 
30th at 8:00 p.m. 

The schedule for the Blue and White Room follows: 
Breakfast 



Schedules for other campus libraries will be posted. 



Mon.— Sat. 




7:30-9:30 


Sunday 


Snack Bar 


8:30-11:00 


Mon.— Sat. 




9:00-11:00 


Sunday 


Lunch 




Mon.— Sat. 




11:30-2:00 


Sunday 


Dinner 


11:30-2:00 


Mon. -Sat. 
Sunday 


SUMMER 1969 


5:00-6:30 
5:00-6:00 


EUROPEAN GROUP FLIGHTS 



For the eighth consecutive year, the Student Activities 
Office, 202-A Flowers Building, is offering Duke European 
Group Fare Flights to members of the Duke University 
Community (faculty, staff, students, and employees). The 
Activities Office will provide tickets only for economy class 
jet air transportation. All other arrangements are the 
responsibility of the individual. 

All faculty, staff, students, and employees of Duke 
University are eligible who have been associated with Duke 
for six months prior to departure times. 



Dates . . . 

Flight 1 (Wash.) Pan Am June 9 
Flight 2 (NYC) Air India June 9 
Flight 3 (NYC) Air India June 10 
Flight 4 (NYC) Pan Am July 23 



(Paris) Pan Am Aug. 26 

(Lon.) Air India Aug. 28 

(Lon.) Air India July 14 

(Lon.) Pan Am Aug. 27 



Fares . 



Minimum of 25 persons 



NYC to London 

Adult $300.00 

Child (12 & over) 300.00 
Child (2-11) . . . 150.00 
Child (under 2) . . .30.00 



Washington to Paris 

Adult $363.80 

Child (12 & over) 363.80 
Child (2-11) . . . 181.90 
Child (under 2) . . .36.40 



Minimum of 50 persons 



NYC to London 

Adult $245.00 

Child ( 12 & over) 245.00 
Child (2-11) . . . 122.50 
Child (under 2) . . .24.50 



Washington to Paris 

Adult $297.80 

Child (12 & over) 297.80 
Child (2-11) . . . 148.90 
Child (under 2) . . .29.80 



(All fares are effective as of 1 April 1968) 
Child's fare is based on age on date of flight departure. No 
deposit required for children under 12. 

Application forms are available at the Flowers Information 
Desk and Room 207 Flowers Building. 



PHILIP JAMISON ART EXHIBITION 
DUKE UNIVERSITY ART MUSEUM 

A one man show of works by Philip Jamison, 
distinguished artist of West Chester, Pennsylvania is now on 
display and open to the public in the recently completed 
Duke University Art Museum on East Campus. 

A graduate of the Philadelphia Museum of Art, Mr. 
Jamison's works are represented in major galleries, private 
collections and the White House and his list of awards and 
honors, particularly in the field of watercolor, are 
impressive. Although he works chiefly in watercolor, Mr. 
Jamison is also expert in oil painting techniques. His works 
are characterized by simplicity of composition and sincerity 
of presentation often using as subject matter his beloved 
countrysides in West Chester, Pennsylvania and Vinalhaven, 
Maine. His pictures reveal his constant search for the truths 
of nature, flowers, snowswept landscapes, calm seas and 
clear air. 

The University is particularly grateful for this fifth 
showing of works from Mr. and Mrs. Harry L. Dalton's 
collection of paintings and to Mr. Jamison for augmenting 
the exhibition with a number of his privately owned works. 
The exhibit, sponsored by the Department of Art and the 
Graphic Arts Committee of the Duke University Student 
Union, will remain on display through the month of March. 
Temporary visiting hours in the Museum are as follows: 
Monday, 2:00-5:00 p.m.; Tuesday-Friday, 10:00 
a.m. -12:00 noon and 1:00-4:00 p.m. 



STUDENT UNION ART EXHIBITION 
PICASSO: CERAMICS AND GRAPHICS 

Two examples of Picasso's excursions into the diverse 
minor arts — ceramics and graphics — are on view in the 
Gallery area of the West Union Building Mfrom March 
2—23 through the exhibition program of the Student 
Union's Graphic Arts Committee. Picasso Arts, Inc., New 
York City, has lent twenty-seven ceramics and twelve 
graphics for the exhibition entitled, "Picasso: Ceramics and 
Graphics," which is circulating throughout the United 
States and Canada under the auspices of The American 
Federation of Arts. 

Picasso began to work in the ceramic medium after 
moving to the south of France in 1946. In the little town of 
Vallauris, a dying earthenware manufacturing center, he 
began his work, collaborating with Suzanne and Georges 
Ramie who operated the Madoura studio there. He was 
attracted to the medium because he could combine both 
the sculptural qualities of clay and the illusory aspects of 
overpainting; and also, since the ceramic ware was always 
fired, the colors would not fade, and the original intent of 
the artist would remain to the viewer. 

These ceramics fall into two categories: Empreinte 
Original de Picasso and Edition Picasso. In the first, Picasso 
works in the negative with a wet mold, carving the design 
into the surface; the cast reproduces the object in reverse. 
In the Edition the artist works in the positive, creating the 
design exactly as it will be viewed. From this a mold is 
made, the incisions following the original and indicating 
where the color is to be applied. All the editions are limited 
and, though Picasso does not cast or paint the editions, he 
examines and approves each finished piece. 



Picasso learned the technique of lithography in Fernand 
Mourlot's studio in Paris. After moving to the south of 
France he continued to make lithographs with zinc plates 
and stones sent him by Mourlot. He also made linoleum 
cuts and estampes. Impressions are made by printers in 
Vallauris under the direction of M. Arnera. Picasso 
supervises. 

DUKE ARTISTS SERIES 
GARY GRAFFMAN REPLACES CURZON 

Announcement of Gary Graff man, brilliant concert 
pianist, as the replacement for Clifford Curzon whose 
recital was postponed because of illness and now is 
cancelled because of scheduling conflicts, is announced by 
the Duke Artists Series. The date will be announced in the 
next University Calendar. 



SPECIAL UNIVERSITY ANNOUNCEMENTS 

Dr. Barnes Woodhall has been appointed Chancellor pro 
tern of the University, effective immediately. 



Dr. Richard L. Tuthill has resigned as University 
Registrar, effective September 1, 1969. Dr. Clark R. Cahow 
will become University Registrar on that date. 



Dean Harold W. Lewis, as Chairman of the 
Undergraduate Faculty Council, has appointed a 
Supervisory Committee to consider an African and 
Afro-American studies program for undergraduates. 
Professor Louis Budd is Chairman, and the members are 
John W. Cell, Samuel D. Cook, Joel Smith, and John J. 
TePaske. 



Professor Louis D. Volpp has been appointed Dean of 
the Graduate School of Business Administration, effective 
March 1, 1969. 



UlUIIIIIIIlMIIMtlllllllMIIHirilllHIIItllHItlllllllMIIIIIIMIIIIIIItllllllllllllMMIIIIUIIIIIHllllllllllllllllltrillllllllllHMHIIIIIItltlllll 

UNIVERSITY CALENDAR 

ANNOUNCEMENT 

There will be no Calendar during the Spring Recess \ 

1 (March 22-30, 1969). Deadline for the publication | 

I of the next University Calendar (March 30— April 6, I 

| 1969) will be Tuesday, March 25th at 1:00 p.m. All j 

| notices should be submitted to the Calendar Office, | 
1 Room 207 Flowers Building, extension 2911. 

It HI n i ■IIIIIIHtllllllllMllllllllllllllirillllMIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIinilllllllllllinilfllfllllllllllllliniHtllllllllllllllmiTf 



Duke University 

CALENDAR J 




Mar. 30 - Apr. 6, 1969 



Volume 69 



Published Mar. 28, 1969 



Number 12 



Sunday, March 30 

10:30—10:45 a.m. Carillon Recital. Mr. J. Samuel 

Hammond, University Carillonneur. 
„1:00 a.m. University Service of Worship. University 

Chapel. Preacher: The Reverend Dr. Richard A. 

Goodling, Professor of Pastoral Care. Sermon: "More 

Than A King?" Broadcast over Radio Station WDNC. 
11:25 a.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Challenges in 

Education." WCHL Chapel Hill. Dr. Orrin Pilkey will 

discuss "Exploring the Hatteras Canyon." 
4:00—6:00 p.m. International Open House. 2022 Campus 

Drive. 
7:30 p.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Challenges in 

Education." WPTF Raleigh. Dr. Joseph E. Johnson, II 

will discuss "Let's Teach It Like It Is." 

Monday, March 31 

8: 10 a.m. Classes are resumed. 

4:15 p.m. Zoology Seminar. Room 111 Biological Sciences 

Building. Speaker: Dr. Richard C. Bruce. 
4:15—5:30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 

faculty, staff members, and students. 
5:15 p.m. Faculty Volleyball. Card Gymnasium. 
8:15—9:30 p.m. West Campus Swimming Pool open to 

faculty members and their families. Faculty children 

will be admitted only when accompanied by their 

parents. 



Tuesday, April 1 

10:00 a.m. Divinity School Chapel Service. University 

Chapel. Speaker: Dr. Kenneth Clark. Reader: Mr. Barry 

Herndon. 
3:00 p.m. Lacrosse: Duke vs. Oberlin. Lacrosse Field near 

Indoor Stadium. 
4:15—5:30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 

faculty, staff members, and students. 
7:00-10:00 p.m. Arts and Crafts Workshop in 

Two-Dimensional Media. Room 108 Art Building. 
7:30—10:00 p.m. Scottish Country Dancing. Presbyterian 

Student Center. 
8:00 p.m. Student Union Cinematic Arts Committee Film 

Series. Auditorium, Biological Sciences Building. "A 

FILM OF LENNY BRUCE." Admission by series 

ticket or $.75 at the door. 



Wednesday, April 2 

10:00 a.m. Divinity School Chapel Service. University 

Chapel. Speaker: Dr. McMurry Richey. Reader: Miss 

Nettie Peery. 
4:15—5:30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 

faculty, staff members, and students. 
6:25—8:00 p.m. Chapel Choir Rehearsal. University 

Chapel. 
7:00 p.m. E.I.T. Lecture Series in Electricity. Auditorium, 

Engineering Building. 
7:00—9:00 p.m. Open House Badminton for all men and 

women: faculty and students. East Campus 

Gymnasium. 
7:30 p.m. Graduate Student Association Meeting. Room 

136 Social Science Building. 
8:00 p.m. Slavic Colloquium. Green Room, East Duke 

Building. Speaker: Professor Thomas J. Hegarty. 
8:00 p.m. Woman's College Visiting Scholar-in-Residence 

Lecture: President Fernando Belaunde-Terry. Music 

Room, East Duke Building. 



Thursday, April 3 

Maundy Thursday 
10:00 a.m. Divinity School Chapel Service. University 

Chapel. Maundy Thursday Service of Holy 

Communion. Celebrant: Dr. John J. Rudin. 
4:00 p.m. Department of Romance Languages Lecture. 

Room 217 Languages Building. Speaker: Professor 

Elias L. Rivers. 
4:15—5:30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 

faculty, staff members, and students 
5:00—6:00 p.m. Dean's Hour. Hospital Amphitheater. 

Speaker: Dr. Eugene A. Stead, Jr. 
7:00-10:00 p.m. Arts and Crafts Workshop in 

Two-Dimensional Media. Room 108 Art Building. 
8:00 p.m. Josiah C. Trent Society Meeting. Teer House, 

4019 North Roxboro Road. Speaker: Dr. W.D.A. 

Smith. 
8:00 p.m. Student Union Open House. Room 208 Flowers 

Building. (See Special Notice). 
8:15—9:30 p.m. West Campus Swimming Pool open to 

faculty members and their families. Faculty children 

will be admitted only when accompanied by their 

parents. 
8:30 p.m. Faculty Apartments— York House Poetry 

Seminar. Faculty Apartments. Speaker: Professor 

Wallace Fowlie. 



Friday, April 4 



Good Friday 

9:00 a.m. The final examination of Mr. William Watts 
Williams for the Ed.D. degree in Education. Room 08A 
West Duke Building. 

10:00 a.m. Divinity School Chapel Service. University 
Chapel. Good Friday Services. Divinity School Choir 
Special Service of Music. 

12:00 noon-3:00 p.m. Good Friday Service: The Seven 
Last Words from the Cross. University Chapel. 

12:30 p.m. Plant Ecology Seminar. Room 144 Biological 
Sciences Building. Speaker: Mr. Jack Amundson. 

2:00 p.m. Canadian Studies Lecture. Room 139 Social 
Science Building. Speaker: Professor Ramsay Cook. 

3:30 p.m. Chemistry Staff Seminar. Room 130 
Psychology— Sociology Building. Speaker: Dr. John 
CD. Brand. 

4:00 p.m. Anthropology Seminar. Room 139 Social 
Science Building. Speaker: Dr. Roger M. Keesing. 

4:15—5:30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 
faculty, staff members, and students. Faculty 
daughters, ages 6 to 16, may also swim; those 10 and 
under must be accompanied by their mothers. 

6:00 p.m. Phi Beta Kappa Initiation and Dinner. D Room 
and Ballroom, West Campus Union. 

7:00—9:00 p.m. Open House Badminton for all men and 
women: faculty and students. East Campus 
Gymnasium. 

7:45 p.m. Phi Beta Kappa Lecture. Union Ballroom, West 
Campus. Speaker: Dr. Julia Henderson. 

8:00 p.m. Student Union Cinematic Arts Committee Film 
Series. Auditorium, Biological Sciences Building. "THE 
SILENCE" directed by Ingmar Bergman. The third 
film of Bergman's incredible religious trilogy, "The 
Silence" depicts a world of despair in which God is 
silent and human relations are grotesquely egocentric 
and perversely sexual. "CONFESSIONS OF A BLACK 
MOTHER SUCCUBA" directed by Robert Nelson. As 
the catalogue states, "violence, sex, and TV 
commercials are the recurrent themes of this 
disconcerting movie. There is humor, but it is black 
and hip and not for timid souls." 



Saturday, April 5 



10:55 a.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Challenges in 
Education." WDNC Durham. Dr. Orrin Pilkey will 
discuss "Exploring the Hatteras Canyon." 

2:00 p.m. Lacrosse: Duke vs. Towson State. Lacrosse Field 
near Indoor Stadium. 

3:00—5:00 p.m. East Campus Gymnasium: Open to 
students, faculty, and staff for recreation (swimming, 
badminton, volleyball, basketball, table tennis). 

7:00 and 9:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page Auditorium. 
"BEDAZZLED" with Peter Cook, Dudley Moore, 
Eleanor Bron, and Racquel Welch. "Faust story with a 
fresh, mod look in witty, crusty, comedy about fumbly 
London restaurant worker who sells soul to devil in 



exchange for becoming man of the world. But the 
bargain is comically loaded. Inventive acting, irreverent 
humor, stylish direction." ~ Cue. 
8: 15 p.m. Ciompi Quartet Recital. Music Room, East Duke 
Building. 



Sunday, April 6 



Easter Sunday 
7:00 a.m. Sunrise Service. Sarah P. Duke Memorial 

Gardens. Preacher: The Reverend Stanford R. Hall, 

Chaplain to Lutheran Students. 
9:00 and 11:00 a.m. , University Service of Worship. 

University Chapel. Preacher: The Reverend Professor 

James T. Cleland, Dean of the Chapel. Broadcast over 

Radio Station WDNC. 
10:30—10:45 a.m. Carillon Recital. Mr. J. Samuel 

Hammond, University Carillonneur. 
3:00—5:00 p.m. East Campus Gymnasium: Open to 

students, faculty, and staff for recreation (swimming, 

badminton, volleyball, basketball, table tennis). 
4:00—6:00 p.m. International Open House. 2022 Campus 

Drive. 
7:00 and 9:00 p.m., Quadrangle Pictures. Page Auditorium. 

"BEDAZZLED." 
7:30 p.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Challenges in 

Education." WPTF Raleigh. Dr. Ben Younger will 

discuss "Pregnancy and the Immunity Response 

Puzzle." 



NOTICES for the Duke University Calendar 
should be submitted IN WRITTEN FORM to Room 
207 Flowers Building, not later than 5:00 p.m. 
Tuesday. Ext. 2911. 

Published by Duke University Student Activities 
Department, Box KM, Duke Station, Durham, N.C., 
27706 each week when school is in session. 
Subscriptions: $2.50 per year. Address inquiries to 
Box KM, Duke Station, Durham, N.C. 27706. Second 
class postage paid at Durham, N.C. 



UNIVERSITY SERVICE OF WORSHIP 

The Reverend Dr. Richard A. Goodling, Professor of 
Pastoral Care, will deliver the sermon at the University 
Service of Worship on Sunday, March 30th, at 11:00 a.m. 
in the University Chapel. The sermon topic is "More Than a 
King?" 

ZOOLOGY SEMINAR 

The Department of Zoology will hold a seminar on 
Monday, March 31st, at 4:15 p.m. in Room 111 Biological 
Sciences Building. Dr. Richard C. Bruce, Associate 
Professor of Zoology, Western Carolina University, will 
speak on the "Evolution of Life History Patterns in 
Primitive Plethodontid Salamanders." Coffee and tea will 
be served at 4:00 p.m. 



Richard Bruce took his undergraduate work at Tufts 
University, his MA in 1961 and last spring his Ph.D. at 
Duke. During his graduate career, he has taught at Converse 
College and at Western Carolina University where he is now 
Associate Professor of Zoology. His several publications 
deal with Physiology, systematics and distribution of 
amphibians and reptiles of the Carolinas. 

GRADUATE STUDENTS ASSOCIATION MEETING 

The monthly meeting of the Graduate Student 
Association will be held at 7:30 p.m. on Wednesday, April 
2nd, in Room 136 Social Science Building. All graduate 
students and other interested members of the University 
Community are invited to attend. 

SLAVIC COLLOQUIUM 

The April Colloquium of the Duke— UNC Cooperative 
Program in Russian and East European Studies will present 
Professor Thomas J. Hegarty, Associate of the Russian 
Research Center at Harvard University. Professor Hegarty 
will talk on "The Russian Student Movement in Late 
Nineteenth and Early Twentieth Century" in the Green 
Room, East Duke Building at 8:00 p.m. on Wednesday, 
April 2nd. A discussion will follow his presentation. 

PRESIDENT FERNANDO BELAUNDE-TERRY 
WOMAN'S COLLEGE SCHOLAR-IN-RESIDENCE 

President Fernando Belaunde-Terry of Peru will be a 
Visiting Scholar-in- Residence of the Woman's College from 
March 31st to April 4th. He will meet with several groups 
of students during his stay and will give a public lecture on 
Wednesday, April 2nd at 8:00 p.m. in the Music Room, 
East Duke Building. 

President Belaunde-Terry was born October 7, 1912 in 
Lima, Peru. He was educated in Paris, received a B.S. degree 
in architecture from the University of Texas, and became 
one of his country's leading architects, founding, in 1937, 
the publication El Arquitecto Peruana, one of the best 
magazines in its field. He was one of the founders of the 
Institute of Urbanism in Peru, now the Planning Institute, 
and was founding director of the Peruvian Society of 
Architects. Helping to establish the Department of 
Architecture in the National University of Engineering in 
Peru, he was its Dean from 1948 to 1960. He was a pioneer 
in planning housing developments and establishing popular 
recreation programs in Peru. 

In 1956 he formed his own party called Popular Action 
(Accion Popular) and was elected President in 1963. His 
government was concerned with what he called a peaceful 
revolution and the conquest of Peru by the Peruvians. His 
favorite project as President involved the building of a super 
highway on the eastern slopes of the Andes in order to 
open the Amazon Valley to settlers. He is at present visiting 
professor at the Department of City and Regional Planning 
at Harvard University. 

DEPARTMENT OF ROMANCE LANGUAGES LECTURE 

Professor Elias L. Rivers, of the Johns Hopkins 
University, will speak on "Cervantes' Journey to Parnassus" 
at the Department of Romance Languages Lecture which 



will be given in Room 217 Languages Building at 4:00 p.m. 
on Thursday, April 3rd. Members of the University 
Community and the general public are cordially invited. 

A native of Charleston, South Carolina, Professor Rivers 
studied at Yale. Before going to the Hopkins in 1964, he 
taught at Yale, Dartmouth, and Ohio State. One of the 
most distinguished American Hispanists, he has served as 
secretary general of the International Association of 
Hispanists since its foundation in 1962. Professor Rivers' 
main scholarly interest is in Spanish Renaissance poetry. He 
is the author of several books and many articles. His 
magnum opus, a critical edition of the poetry of Garcilaso 
de la Vega, first published in 1964, is destined to become a 
classic of Hispanic scholarship. 



DEAN'S HOUR 

The Dean's Hour will be held on Thursday, April 3rd. 
from 5:00 to 6:00 p.m. in the Hospital Amphitheater. Dr. 
Eugene A. Stead, Jr., Professor of Medicine, will speak on 
"Medical Education and Practice." 



HOLY WEEK SERVICES 

Maundy Thursday, April 3 

At 7:30 p.m., the traditional Command (Maundy) 
Communion Service will be celebrated in the University 
Chapel. The celebrant is to be the Reverend Dr. James T. 
Cleland, Dean of the Chapel, and the communion 
meditation will be delivered by the Reverend Dr. Franklin 
Young, Professor of New Testament and Patristic Studies. 

Good Fnday, April 4 

The three-hour Crucifixion Service will be held in the 
University Chapel, beginning at 12:00 o'clock noon. "The 
Seven Last Words from the Cross" will be interpreted by 
seven members of the Duke University faculty. 

Easter Sunrise Service, April 6 

At 7.00 o'clock in the Sarah P. Duke Memorial Gardens, 
an Easter Sunrise service will be conducted under the 
auspices of the Special Observances Committee of the Duke 
University Religious Council. The preacher will be the 
Reverend Stanford R. Hall, Chaplain to Lutheran students. 
Music will be furnished by student groups. 

Easter Chapel Services, April 6 

Two identical University Services of Worship will be 
conducted in the University Chapel, the first one beginning 
at 9:00 a.m. and the second one at 11:00 a.m. The preacher 
at both services is the Reverend Professor James T. Cleland, 
Dean of the Chapel. Special music will be furnished under 
the direction of Mr. Ben Smith, Choir Director and Dr. 
Rudolph Kremer, Organist. 



JOSIAH C. TRENT SOCIETY MEETING 

The Josiah C. Trent Society, an informal group 
interested in the history of medicine, invites the University 
Community to a meeting to be held on Thursday, April 



3rd, at 8:00 p.m. at the Teer House, 4019 North Roxboro 
Road. Dr. W.D.A. Smith, Department of Anaesthesia, 
University of Leeds, Leeds, England, will speak on "Henry 
Hill Hickman, A Pioneer in Anesthesia" Please advise the 
Library Secretary, Ext. 3505, if you plan to attend. 



STUDENT UNION OPEN HOUSE 

The Student Union will sponsor an informal meeting and 
open house on Thursday, April 3rd, at 8:00 p.m. in Room 
208 Flowers Building. As the result of much thought and 
planning, the Duke Student Union has decided to institute 
a radically new concept in campus organization. After years 
of serving and being governed primarily by the 
undergraduate population at Duke, the Student Union has 
revamped its purpose and structure to include graduate and 
professional students, faculty, administration, and local 
residents as well as undergraduates. This new 
university-wide organization will be known simply as the 
Duke University Union. The purpose of the Thursday 
meeting will be to discuss the new structure of the Union 
Board with all interested members of the Duke 
Community. This meeting is open to the public. 



FACULTY APARTMENTS-YORK HOUSE 
POETRY SEMINAR 

Dr. Wallace Fowlie, James B. Duke Professor of 
Romance Languages, will present readings from Rimbaud 
(in French and English) at the Faculty Apartments— York 
House Poetry Seminar on Thursday, April 3rd at 8:30 p.m. 
in Faculty Apartments. French texts will be provided and 
the University Community is invited to attend. 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE ED.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. William Watts Williams for 
the Ed.D. degree in Education will be held on Friday, April 
4th, at 9:00 a.m. in Room 08A West Duke Building. The 
subject of Mr. Williams' dissertation is "An Experimental 
Investigation of Individualized Instruction in the Teaching 
of Quantitative Physical Science." The committee to 
conduct the examination consists of Professors Sherwood 
Githens, Jr., W.H. Cartwright, Lloyd J. Borstelmann, Scott 
Gehman and Henry Sublett. Professor Githens will preside. 



DIVINITY SCHOOL LENTEN SERVICE 

The Divinity School choir under the direction of Mr. 
Charles Alexander will present a special Lenten Service at 
10:00 a.m. on Friday, April 4th, in the University Chapel. 
The choir will sing The Passion According to St. Matthew 
by Thomas L. DeVictoria. Divinity School choir members 
will take solo parts and the evangelist will be narrated by 
one of the faculty members. Miss Helen Kendall is organist 
for the Divinity School choir. The University Community 
and the general public are cordially invited to attend. 



PLANT ECOLOGY SEMINAR 

Mr. Jack Amundson, Graduate Student in Botany, will 
present a seminar on "Why is the Elephant Tree, 
Pachycormus discolor, confined to Baja Califomia?'at the 
Plant Ecology Seminar on Friday, April 4th, at 12:30 p.m. 
in Room 144 Biological Sciences Building. 



CANADIAN STUDIES LECTURE 

The University Community is invited to hear Ramsay 
Cook of the University of Toronto and presently Mackenzie 
King Visiting Professor of Canadian Studies at Harvard 
University speak on "Nationalism in Canada." The lecture 
will be hheld on Friday, April 4th, at 2:00 p.m. in Room 
139 Social Science Building. 



CHEMISTRY STAFF SEMINAR 

Dr. John CD. Brand, Department of Chemistry, 
Vanderbilt University, will speak at the Chemistry Staff 
Seminar on Friday, April 4th at 3:30 p.m. in Room 130 
Psychology— Sociology Building. The subject of Dr. Brand's 
address will be "Ultraviolet Spectroscopy, and Structure of 
the Excited States of Larger Molecules." All interested 
persons are cordially invited to attend. 



ANTHROPOLOGY SEMINAR 

Dr. Roger M. Keesing of the University of California at 
Santa Cruz will speak on "Descent, Residence, and Cultural 
Codes" at the Anthropology Seminar at 4:00 p.m. on 
Friday, April 4th, in Room 139 Social Science Building. 



PHI BETA KAPPA DINNER AND LECTURE 

The annual spring initiation, dinner, and public lecture 
of Phi Beta Kappa will take place on Friday, April 4th. The 
initiation will begin at 6:00 p.m. in the D Room, West 
Campus Union. The dinner will begin at 6:30 p.m. in the 
Union Ballroom. The lecture, also in the Union Ballroom, 
will be delivered by Dr. Julia Henderson, Associate for 
Technical Co-operation, United Nations. This lecture, 
beginning about 7:45 p.m., will be open to the public. 
Members must make or cancel reservations for the dinner 
with Professor W.F. Stinespring (113 Divinity School of 
4795 Duke Station). This year's initiates and all retired 
members will be guests of the Chapter at the dinner. 



CIOMPI QUARTET RECITAL 

The Ciompi String Quartet will be assisted in an April 
5th recital by three guest artists. Appearing with the 
quartet in an all-Schubert program will be Bruno Di Cecco, 
cellist with the New England String Quartet and Associate 
Professor of Music at the University of Connecticut; Lynn 
Peters, string bass virtuoso now at the University of 
Indiana; and Betty Bullock Talbot, pianist and a member of 
the Department of Music. 



The program will be presented on Saturday, April 5th, at 
8:15 p.m. in the Music Room, East Duke Building. No 
admission will be charged and the public is cordially invited 
to attend. The program follows: 



Ciompi String Quartet 



Julia Mueller, viola 
Luca Di Cecco, cello 

Franz Schubert 



Franz Schubert 



Franz Schubert 



Giorgio Ciompi, violin 
Arlene Di Cecco, violin 

Quartet Satz 

Allegro assai 

Quintet in C Major, op. 163 
Allegro ma non troppo 
Adagio 

Scherzo and trio 
Allegretto 

Quintet in A Major, op. 114 
Allegro vivace 
Andante 
Scherzo 

Andantino; A llegre t to 
Allegro giusto 



DUKE UNIVERSITY ARTISTS SERIES 
SHIRLEY VERRETT, MEZZO-SOPRANO 

Shirley Verrett, brilliant young mezzo-soprano, will be 
presented on Friday, April 11th, as the third offering of the 
Duke Artists Series. Single tickets, priced at $3.25, $2.75, 
and $2.25, are available at Page Box Office; reservations 
may be called in to 684-4059. Miss Verrett's concert will 
begin at 8:15 p.m. in Page Auditorium; she is a recent 
addition to the Hurok roster of stars. 

In the space of some five seasons the American 
mezzo-soprano has become firmly established as an 
international singing star of the first magnitude. This season 
alone she sings Carmen in Florence, Rossini's Stabat Mater 
in Rome, and Amneris, Eboli and Brangaene at Covent 
Garden. Her performance as Queen Elizabeth in the 
American Opera Society's Maria Stuarda this December 
brought from the New York Times the comment, "Her 
voice has blossomed into a big, brilliant instrument," and 
the New Yorker reported, "Shirley Verrett, a 
mezzo-soprano of striking appearance, sang the role 
majestically." This season she made her debut at the 
Metropolitan Opera as Carmen. 

Her program follows: 



Two Arias from "Alcina" 

Mi lusinga il dolce affetto 
E gelosia 

Vier ernste Gesange, Opus 121 

Denn es gehet dem Menschen 
Ich wandte mich 
O Tod, wie bitter 
Wenn ich mit Menschen 

Aria d'Orpheer 

Amour, viens rendre a mon ame 



Handel 



Brahms 



Gluck 



Trois Chansons de Negresse, Opus 148b Milhaud 

Mon Histoire 
Abandonnee 
Sans Feu ni lieu 

Zigeuner Melodien, Opus 55 Dvorak 

Mein Lied ertont 
Ei, wie mein Triangel 
Rings ist der Wald 
Als die alte Mutter 
Reingestimmt die saiten 

In dem weiten, breiten Luft'gen Leinenkleide 
Darf des Falken Schwinge 



ADVANCE NOTICE 
NIKOLAIS DANCE COMPANY 

Tickets are now available in Page Box Office for the 
Tuesday, April 29th performance of the Nikolais Dance 
Company. Priced at $3.50, $3.00, and $2.50, tickets may 
be ordered by sending a check made payable to Duke 
University and sent to Box KM Duke Station and enclosing 
a stamped, self-addressed envelope for ticket return. 

"There is classic ballet, there is modern dance and there 
is Alwin Nikolais.. .Obviously he is one of the most 
important men ever to hit theater dance... No one 
interested in the arts of the theater can afford to ignore Mr. 
Nikolais, who combines the roles of poet and showman in a 
strangely meaningful way. ..this is the new theater and 
Alwin Nikolais its prophet." New York Times. 



DUKE UNIVERSITY ARTISTS SERIES 

GARY GRAFFMAN, PIANIST 

REPLACES CLIFFORD CURZON 

Gary Graffman, considered by many to be the top 
American pianist, will perform in Page Auditorium at 8:15 
p.m. on Wednesday, May 7th. The Artists Series Committee 
is pleased to present Mr. Graffman as replacement for 
Clifford Curzon who was unable to fill his engagement 
because of illness and, finally, because of scheduling 
conflicts. Season ticket holders are asked to use their 
Curzon tickets for this event. 

Those wishing tickets for the concert by Shirley Verrett, 
soprano, on Friday, April 11th and the Graffman recital on 
Wednesday, May 7th, may secure them at Page Box Office 
from 9:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m. on Mondays through 
Fridays. Tickets are priced at $3.25, $2.75, and $2.25. 
Reservations may be made by calling 684-4059. 



SUMMER 1969 
EUROPEAN GROUP FLIGHTS 

For the eighth consecutive year, the Student Activities 
Office, 202-A Flowers Building, is offering Duke European 
Group Fare Flights to members of the Duke University 
Community (faculty, staff, students, and employees). The 
Activities Office will provide tickets only for economy class 
jet air transportation. All other arrangements are the 
responsibility of the individual. 



All faculty, staff, students, and employees of Duke 
University are eligible who have been associated with Duke 
for six months prior to departure times. 



Dates . . . 

Flight 1 (Wash.) Pan Am June 9 
Flight 2 (NYC) Air India June 9 
Flight 3 (NYC) Air India June 10 
Flight 4 (NYC) Pan Am July 23 



(Paris) Pan Am Aug. 26 

(Lon.) Air India Aug. 28 

(Lon.) Air India July 14 

(Lon.) Pan Am Aug. 27 



Fares . 



Minimum of 25 persons 



NYC to London 

Adult $300.00 

Child (12 & over) 300.00 
Child (2-11) . . . 150.00 
Child (under 2) . . .30.00 



Washington to Paris 

Adult $363.80 

Child ( 12 & over) 363.80 
Child (2-11) . . . 181.90 
Child (under 2) . . .36.40 



Minimum of 50 persons 



NYC to London 

Adult $245.00 

Child (12 & over) 245.00 
Child (2-11) . . . 122.50 
Child (under 2) . . .24.50 



Washington to Paris 

Adult $297.80 

Child ( 12 & over) 297.80 
Child (2-11) . . . 148.90 
Child (under 2) . . .29.80 



(All fares are effective as of 1 April 1968) 
Child's fare is based on age on date of flight departure. No 
deposit required for children under 12. 

Application forms are available at the Flowers Information 
Desk and Room 207 Flowers Building. 



SPECIAL UNIVERSITY ANNOUNCEMENTS 

Mr. Alex Gibson, an employee in the Special Functions 
Department of the Dining Halls, is available when off duty 
to help faculty and staff members with private or 
University entertainment off campus. He can be reached 
through the Dining Halls, Extension 3621, or his residence, 
telephone 286-3682. 



Duke University 

CALENDAR. 




Apr. 6-13, 1969 



Volume 69 



Published April 4, 1969 



Number 13 



Sunday, April 6 

Easter Sunday 
7:00 a.m. Sunrise Service. Sarah P. Duke Memorial 

Gardens. Preacher: The Reverend Stanford R. Hall, 

Chaplain to Lutheran Students. 
9:00 and 11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship. 

University Chapel. Preacher: The Reverend Professor 

James T. Cleland, Dean of the Chapel. Sermon: "An 

Easter Meditation." Broadcast over Radio Station 

WDNC. 
10:30-10:45 a.m. Carillon Recital. Mr. J. Samuel 

Hammond, University Carillonneur. 
11:25 a.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Challenges in 

Education." WCHL Chapel Hill. Mrs. Barbara Singleton 

will discuss "Pre-School for the Hearing Impaired 

Child." 
3:00—5:00 p.m. East Campus Gymnasium: Open to 

students, faculty, and staff for recreation (swimming, 

badminton, volleyball, basketball, table tennis). 
4:00—6:00 p.m. International Open House. 2022 Campus 

Drive. 
7:00 and 9:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page Auditorium. 

"BEDAZZLED." 
7:30 p.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Challenges in 

Education." WPTF Raleigh. Dr. Ben Younger will 

discuss "Pregnancy and the Immunity Response 

Puzzle." 

Monday, April 7 

4:00 p.m. Duke— UNC Cooperative Program in the 

Humanities Lecture: Sir Herbert Butterfield. Room 

208 Flowers Building. 
4:00 p.m. The final examination of Mr. Graddon Richard 

Rowlands for the Ph.D. degree in Political Science. 

2114 Campus Drive. 
4:15 p.m. Zoology Seminar. Room 111 Biological Sciences 

Building. Speaker: Dr. Clarence D. Cone. 
4:15—5:30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 

faculty, staff members, and students. 
5:15 p.m. Faculty Volleyball. Card Gymnasium. 
7:30 p.m. Graduate English Club Meeting. Room 208 

Flowers Building. 
8:00 p.m. Student Union Cinematic Arts Committee Film 

Re-Scheduled. Auditorium, Biological Sciences 

Building. "A FILM OF LENNY BRUCE." Admission 

by series ticket or $.75 at the door. 



8:15 p.m. Erasmus Club Meeting. Green Room, East Duke 
Building. Speaker: Professor Lewis Leary. 

8:15—9:30 p.m. West Campus Swimming Pool open to 
faculty members and their families. Faculty children 
will be admitted only when accompanied by their 
parents. 



Tuesday, April 8 

10:00 a.m. Divinity School Chapel Service. University 

Chapel. Worship: Choral reading with musical 

background. 
2:00 p.m. Mathematics Film Series: "Nim and Other 

Oriented Graph Games." Room 114 Physics Building. 
4:00 p.m. Gerontology Seminar. Room 1504 Gerontology 

Building, Duke Hospital. Speaker: Dr. Morton D. 

Bogdonoff. 
4:15—5:30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 

faculty, staff members, and students. 
7:00 p.m. Tocqueville Society Meeting. Room 101 Union 

Building. 
7:00-10:00 p.m. Arts and Crafts Workshop in 

Two-Dimensional Media. Room 108 Art Building. 
7:30—10:00 p.m. Scottish Country Dancing. Presbyterian 

Student Center. 



Wednesday, April 9 

10:00 a.m. Divinity School Chapel Service. University 

Chapel. Speaker: Dr. Charles Rice. 
11:00 a.m.— 4:30 p.m. Red Cross Bloodmobile at the 

Indoor Stadium. (See Special Notice). 
12:15 p.m. Campus Club Luncheon and Business Meeting. 

Blair House. Speaker: Dr. Juanita M. Kreps. 
4:15—5:30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 

faculty, staff members, and students. 
6:25—8:00 p.m. Chapel Choir Rehearsal. University 

Chapel. 
7:00—9:00 p.m. Open House Badminton for all men and 

women: faculty and students. East Campus 

Gymnasium. 
7:30 p.m. Duke— UNC National Security Policy Seminar. 

Faculty Lounge, Room 278 Phillips Hall, UNC-CH. 

Speaker: Dean Raymond Dawson. 
8:00 p.m. Divinity School Chapel Service. 017 Divinity 

School. Gospel Music from the Black Church. 



Thursday, April 10 



ALUMNAE WEEKEND 
10:00 a.m. Divinity School Chapel Service. Jazz Liturgy in 

the Celestial Omnibus. 
4:00 p.m. Institution of the Harriet Cook Carter 

Lectureship. Baldwin Auditorium. 
4:15—5:30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 

faculty, staff members, and students. 
5:00—6:00 p.m. Dean's Hour. Hospital Amphitheater. 

Speaker: Dr. Jonathan E. Rhoads. 
5:15 p.m. Faculty Volleyball. Card Gymnasium. 
7:00 p.m. E.I.T. Lecture in Kinematics and Dynamics. 

Auditorium, Engineering Building. 
7:00—10:00 p.m. Arts and Crafts Workshop in 

Two-Dimensional Media. Room 108 Art Building. 
8:00 p.m. Trinity College Historical Society Meeting. Moot 

Courtroom, Law School. Speaker: Sir Herbert 

Butterfield. 
8:15 p.m. Harriet Cook Carter Lecture. Auditorium, 

Biological Sciences Building. Speaker: Muriel R. 

Carbery. 
8:15 p.m. Duke University Concert Band Spring Concert. 

Page Auditorium. > 

8:15—9:30 p.m. West Campus Swimming Pool open to 

faculty members and their families. Faculty children 

will be admitted only when accompanied by their 

parents. 



Friday, April 11 



ALUMNAE WEEKEND 

10:00 a.m. Divinity School Chapel Service. University 

Chapel. Contemporary Poetry and the Bible. Reader: 

Mr. Blaine Hudson. 
12:30 p.m. Plant Ecology Seminar. Room 144 Biological 

Sciences Building. Speaker: Mr. William Gregg. 
12:30 p.m. Inter- Varsity Christian Fellowship Forum. 

Main Quad. 
3:00 p.m. The final examination of Mr. John Robert 

Rosenwald for the Ph.D. degree in English. Room 328 

Allen Building. 
3:30 p.m. Chemistry Staff Seminar. Room 130 

Psychology— Sociology Building. Speaker: Dr. D. 

Stanley Tarbell. 
4:15—5:30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 

faculty, staff members, and students. Faculty 

daughters, ages 6 to 16, may also swim; those 10 and 

under must be accompanied by their mothers. 
5:45 p.m. Westminster Fellowship and UCCF. Dinner, 

worship and discussion. Westminster House, Alexander 

Avenue. 
7:00—9:00 p.m. Open House Badminton for all men and 

women: faculty and students. East Campus 

Gymnasium. 
7:30 p.m. Inter- Varsity Christian Fellowship Symposium. 

Baldwin Auditorium. (See Special Notice). 
8:15 p.m. Duke University Artists Series presents Shirley 

Verrett, Mezzo-Soprano. Page Auditorium. 



Saturday, April 12 

ALUMNAE WEEKEND 

10:55 a.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Challenges in 

Education." WDNC Durham. Mrs. Barbara Singleton 

will discuss "Pre-School for the Hearing Impaired 

Child." 
2:00 p.m. Lacrosse: Duke vs. Fairleigh Dickinson. Lacrosse 

Field near Indoor Stadium. 
2:00 p.m. Inter- Varsity Christian Fellowship Seminars. 

East Duke Building. 
3:00—5:00 p.m. East Campus Gymnasium: Open to 

students, faculty, and staff for recreation (swimming, 

badminton, volleyball, basketball, table tennis). 
5:00 p.m. Inter- Varsity Christian Fellowship Dinner. East 

Union. (See Special Notice). 
7:00 and 9:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page Auditorium. 

"GUESS WHO'S COMING TO DINNER" with Spencer 

Tracy, Sidney Poitier, Cecil Kellaway, Beah Richards. 

"Irrepressible, entertaining helping of comedy-drama 

on liberals and interracial marriages faced head-on. 

Liberal parents face test of conscience when daughter 

comes home with Negro doctor she wants to marry. 

Definitely worth seeing." - Cue. In color. 
8:30 p.m. The Celestial Omnibus Presents The Jazz 

Quartet. Coffeehouse, Flowers Building. 

Sunday, April 13 

10:30-10:45 a.m. Carillon Recital. Mr. J. Samuel 

Hammond, University Carillonneur. 
11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship. University 

Chapel. Preacher: The Reverend Dr. Waldo Beach. 

Broadcast over Radio Station WDNC. 
11:25 a.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Challenges in 

Education." WCHL Chapel Hill. Dr. Ian Macintyre will 

discuss "Animals That Don't Belong." 
3:00 p.m. Inter- Varsity Christian Fellowship Symposium. 

Baldwin Auditorium. (See Special Notice). 
3:00—5:00 p.m. East Campus Gymnasium: Open to 

students, faculty, and staff for recreation (swimming, 

badminton, volleyball, basketball, table teenis). 
4:00 p.m. Senior Organ Recital: Mary Etta Eyler. 

University Chapel. 
4:00—6:00 p.m. International Open House. 2022 Campus 

Drive. 
7:00 and 9:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page Auditorium. 

"GUESS WHO'S COMING TO DINNER." 
7:30 p.m. Inter- Varsity Christian Fellowship Symposium. 

Baldwon Auditorium. (See Special Notice). 
7:30 p.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Challenges in 

Education." WPTF Raleigh. Dr. Orrin Pilkey will 

discuss "Exploring the Hatteras Canyon." 



Published by Duke University Student Activities *: 
Department, Box KM, Duke Station, Durham, N.C., *: 
27706 each week when school is in session. :•:• 
Subscriptions: $2.50 per year. Address inquiries to & 
Box KM, Duke Station, Durham, N.C. 27706. Second | 
class postage paid at Durham, N.C. ij: 



EASTER SUNRISE SERVICE 

At 7:00 o'clock in the Sarah P. Duke Memorial Gardens, 
an Easter Sunrise service will be conducted under the 
auspices of the Special Observances Committee of the Duke 
University Religious Council. The preacher will be the 
Reverend Stanford R. Hall, Chaplain to Lutheran students. 
Music will be furnished by student groups. 

UNIVERSITY SERVICE OF WORSHIP 

There will be two University Services of Worship on 
Easter Sunday with The Reverend Professor James T. 
Cleland, Dean of the Chapel, preaching on "An Easter 
Meditation" at 9:00 a.m. and 11:00 a.m. in the University 
Chapel. 

Special Easter music as announced by Choir Director G 
Benjamin Smith will be Easter Chorale by Barber, Here on 
Earth We Have No Continuing Place from Requiem by 
Brahms, and Hallelujah Chorus from The Messiah by 
Handel. 

VISITING PROFESSOR 
SIR HERBERT BUTTERFIELD 

Sir Herbert Butterfield, the distinguished English 
historian, will be on the Duke campus for the month of 
April as a Visiting Professor in the Department of Religion. 
His visit is being sponsored by the Cooperative Program in 
the Humanities of Duke and the University of North 
Carolina. Sir Herbert has held many significant positions at 
Cambridge University including Master of Peterhouse 
College, V ice-Chancellor of the University anRegius 
Professor of Modern History. His publications include The 
Origins of Modern Science, Christianity and History, 
George III and the Historians, and The University and 
Education Today. He has been awarded honorary 
doctorates by prominent universities in Europe, Asia and 
the United States as well as in Scotland, Ireland and 
England. 

While at Duke Professor Butterfield will deliver a series 
of four public lectures entitled "Relations of Christianity 
and History." These will be presented each Monday 
afternoon during the month, the 7th, 14th, 21st, and 28th, 
at 4:00 p.m. in Room 208 Flowers Building. The public is 
invited to these lectures. 

FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. Graddon Richard 
Rowlands for the Ph.D. degree in Political Science will be 
held on Monday, April 7th, at 4:00 p.m. at 2114 Campus 
Drive. The subject of Mr. Rowlands' dissertation is 
"Political Development and the British Foreign Aid 
Program." The committee to conduct the examination 
consists of Professors Ralph Braibanti, John H. Hallowell, 
Robert R. Wilson, Allan Romberg and Robert M. Colver. 
Professor Braibanti will preside. 

ZOOLOGY SEMINAR 

The Department of Zoology will hold a seminar on 
Monday, April 7th, at 4:15 p.m. in Room 111 Biological 
Sciences Building. Dr. Clarence D. Cone, Head, Molecular 
Biophysics Laboratory, Langley Research Center, NASA, 
will speak on "Aeromechanics of Bird Flight." 



Dr. Cone's research interests span a wide range that 
includes both physics and biology. His formal training is in 
biophysics, and chemical and areonautical engineering. He 
has made important contributions to the theory of avian 
flight. He presently is interested in the molecular 
mechanisms that control cell division. 

Coffee and tea will be served at 4:00 p.m. 

GRADUATE ENGLISH CLUB MEETING 

The Graduate Seminar of the Graduate English Club will 
present an interdisciplinary discussion of contemporary 
poetry in America, France, and Italy. Panel members will 
be Professor Stephen Salchenberger, Jim McNab, and John 
Rosenwald. The 'discussion will be held on Monday, April 
7th, at 7:30 p.m. in Room 208 Flowers Building. All 
interested members of the University Community are 
invited to attend. 

ERASMUS CLUB MEETING 

The Erasmus Club will meet on Monday, April 7th, at 
8:15 p.m. in the Green Room, East Duke Building. The 
Philological Club of the University of North Carolina will 
be guests for the joint meeting. The guest speaker will be 
Professor Lewis Leary, Kenan Professor of English at the 
University of North Carolina. Formerly Professor and 
Chairman of the English Department at Columbia 
University, Professor Leary taught at Duke from 
1941—1952. He has published several books and articles on 
nineteenth-century American literature. Professor Leary 
will speak on "The Bankruptcy of Mark Twain." Interested 
members of the University Community are cordially invited 
to attend. 

GERONTOLOGY SEMINAR 

Dr. Morton D. Bogdonoff, Professor of Medicine, will 
speak on "The Super-Specialist Internist as a Geriatrician" 
at the Duke University Council on Aging and Human 
Development. The seminar will be held on Tuesday, April 
8th, at 4:00 p.m. in Room 1504 Gerontology Building, 
Duke Hospital. The University Community is invited to 
attend. 



TOCQUEVILLE SOCIETY MEETING 

There will be an important meeting of the Tocqueville 
Society to discuss the spring membership drive and 
nomination for next year's officers on Tuesday, April 8th, 
at 7:00 p.m. in Room 101 Union Building. The Tocqueville 
Society is an educational organization which focuses 
attention on conservative philosophy and its relation to 
current discussions within all of the disciplines of the liberal 
arts. 

RED CROSS BLOODMOBILE 

The Red Cross Bloodmobile will be at the Indoor 
Stadium on Wednesday, April 9th, from 11:00 a.m. to 4:30 
p.m. Students, faculty and employees of the university are 
invited to participate. Donation of one pint of blood will 
insure that the donor and his immediate family will be 
provided all the blood they need, without being asked for 
replacement, for one year after the date of donation. 



CAMPUS CLUB MEETING 

The Campus Club of Duke University will hold its 
annual luncheon and business meeting at Blair House on 
Wednesday, April 9th, at 12:15 p.m. Dr. JuanitaM. Kreps, 
Professor of Economics and Director of Undergraduate 
Studies, will be the speaker. Her topic is "Double Jeopardy: 
Old Age and Low Incomes." Professor Kreps will describe 
the financial status of the aged in general, and also 
comment on the retirement income situation that applies to 
members of the Duke faculty. 

Mrs. Bruce Corrie is chairman for the luncheon. The 
hostess department is Physical Education, West. Tickets for 
eligible Campus Club members are available through Mrs. O. 
Kelly Ingram, 2728 Sevier Street, telephone 489-9468. 

DUKE-UNC SEMINAR 
NATIONAL SECURITY POLICY 

The Duke— UNC National Security Policy Seminar will 
meet in the Faculty Lounge, Room 278 Phillips Hall, at the 
University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, at 7:30 p.m. on 
Wednesday, April 9th. Dean Raymond Dawson, Professor 
of Political Science at the University of North Carolina will 
speak on "The McNamara Era." 

ALUMNAE WEEKEND SCHEDULE 

Thursday, April 10 
4:00 p.m. Institution of Harriet Cook Carter Lectureship. 

Baldwin Auditorium. 
8:15 p.m. Harriet Cook Carter Lecture. Biological Sciences 

Auditorium Speaker: Muriel R. Carbery. 

Friday, April 11 
2:00 p.m. Tour of New Art Museum. Gallery Talk: Robert 

Moeller, Director. 
3:00 p.m. Bus Tour of Campus. Leaving from East Duke 

Building. 
4:00 p.m. Tour of Perkins Library. 
6:00 p.m. Alumnae Dinner. Graduate Center. Speakers: 

Dean Myrtle Brown, Dean Jane Philpott, Mr. Roger 

Marshall. Topic: "Where We Are— Where We Are 

Going." 

Saturday, April 12 
10:00 a.m. Annual Meeting of Woman's College Alumnae 

Association. Music Room, East Duke Building. 
11:00-11:30 a.m. Coffee Hour. East Duke Parlor. 
11:30 a.m. Addresses: Dr. Barnes Woodhall on "Medicine 

in the Year 2000." Dr. Theo Pilkington on "Women in 

Technology." East Duke Parlor. 
1:00 p.m. Alumnae Luncheon. East Union Building. 

Speaker: Mrs. Fannie Gray Patton. 

HARRIET COOK CARTER LECTURE 

Muriel R. Carbery, Professor of Nursing, Dean of Cornell 
University School of Nursing and Director of Nursing 
Service at New York Hospital, will present the first Harriet 
Cook Carter Lecture on Thursday, April 10th. The lecture, 
which is open to the public, will be held at 8:15 p.m. in the 
Biological Sciences Auditorium. The title of the lecture will 
be "Newer Dimensions in Nursing." The Institution of the 
Harriet Cook Carter Lectureship will be held at 4:00 p.m. 
in Baldwin Auditorium and is open to the public. 



DEAN'S HOUR 

The Dean's Hour will be held on Thursday, April 10th, 
from 5:00—6:00 p.m. in the Hospital Amphitheater. Dr. 
Jonathan E. Rhoads, John Rhea Barton Professor of 
Surgery, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, will 
present the Deryl Hart Lecture. The topic of his 
presentation will be "The Impact of Intravenous 
Hyperalimentation Upon Certain Surgical Problems." 



SPRING CONCERT 
DUKE UNIVERSITY CONCERT BAND 

Featured guest artist, John Marcellus, co-principal 
trombone with the National Symphony of Washington, will 
join the Duke Concert Band as soloist on Thursday, April 
10th, at 8:15 p.m. in Page Auditorium. He will perform 
with the Band the Wagenseil Concerto for Trombone which 
Paul Bryan, conductor, found while doing research in 
Czechoslovakia last year and transcribed himself for wind 
ensemble. Other works on this program which is open to 
the public without charge are as follows: 

Overture to Anacreon Cherubini 

Toccata for Symphonic Band Maves 

Morceau Symphonique for Trombone Guilmant 

John Marcellus, trombone 

Symphony in B Flat for Concert Band Hindemith 

March Rakoczy Berlioz 

Student Conductor, Kern Holoman 



UNDERGRADUATE FACULTY COUNCIL MEETING 

The meeting of the Undergraduate Faculty Council 
scheduled for Thursday, April 10th, has been cancelled. 



PLANT ECOLOGY SEMINAR 

Mr. William Gregg, graduate student in Botany, will 
speak on "Observations on Vegetation and Land Use on the 
Island of Guadeloupe, French West Indies" at the Plant 
Ecology Seminar on Friday, April 11th, at 12:30 p.m. in 
Room 144 Biological Sciences Building. 



CHRISTIAN SYMPOSIUM 
"THE CHURCH, WHY?" 

In our post-Christian generation the nature and function 
of the Church sound like irrelevant topics. But the Church 
is still with us, and to dismiss the whole matter by saying 
"Let the Church be the Church" is just an empty cliche. 
Believing that what the church does is an important 
consequence of what the church believes itself to be, the 
Duke Inter- Varsity Christian Fellowship has invited four 
speakers to probe these aspects on April 11th, 12th, and 
13th. The speakers will be: Dr. Stuart Barton Babbage, 
President, Cornwell School of Theology, Philadelphia, Pa., 
Mr. Tom Skinner, President, Tom Skinner Crusades, 
Brooklyn, N.Y., Dr. Grady Spires, Associate Professor of 
Philosophy, Gordon College, Wenham, Mass., and Mr. 
Edward Ellis, Student, Shaw University, Raleigh, N.C. 



The schedule follows: 

Friday, April 11 
12: 30 p.m. Forum on Main Quad. 
7:30 p.m. Addresses. Baldwin Auditorium. 

Dr. Stuart Barton Babbage, "The Biblical View of the 

Church and Its Mission." 

Mr. Tom Skinner, "Jesus Christ and the Black 

Revolution." 

Panel discussion followed by reception. 

Saturday, April 12 
2:00 p.m. Seminars. East Duke Building. 

Dr. Babbage — Christians and the Trade Union 

Movement. 

Mr. Skinner — The White Christian's Response to 

Revolution. 

Dr. Spires — The Church and the Kingdon, Some 

Pertinent Thoughts. 
5:00 p.m. Dinner with Participants. Upstairs, East Union. 

Open to all. 

Sunday, April 13 
3:00 p.m. Dr. Grady Spires, "The Evangelical Churches 

and the Inner City." Panel Discussion. Baldwin 

Auditorium. 
7: 30 p.m. "Is Christianity Credible?" 

Grady Spires, Elward Ellis, and others from Shaw 

University "Do Their Own Thing!" Baldwin Auditorium. 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. John Robert Rosenwald 
for the Ph.D. degree in English will be held on Friday, April 
11th, at 3:00 p.m. in Room 328 Allen Building. The 
subject of Mr. Rosenwald's dissertation is "A Theory of 
Prosody and Rhythm." The committee to conduct the 
examination consists of Professors Lionel Stevenson, 
Bernard Duffey, Edmund Reiss and Herman Salinger. 
Professor Stevenson will preside. 



CHEMISTRY STAFF SEMINAR 

Dr. D. Stanley Tarbell, Department of Chemistry, 
Vanderbilt University, will speak at the Chemistry Staff 
Seminar on Friday, April 11th, at 3:30 p.m. in Room 130 
Psychology— Sociology Building. The subject of Dr. 
Tarbell's address will be "Studies on Methoxonium Ions." 
All interested persons are cordially invited to attend. 



UCCF AND WESTMINSTER FELLOWSHIP 

The Westminster Fellowship and the United Campus 
Christian Fellowship, nurture groups of the University 
Christian Movement, will meet on Tuesday, April 8th, at 
North Carolina College to see and discuss a film entitled 
"Martin Luther King: The Man and the March." 

The Westminster Fellowship and the United Campus 
Christian Fellowship will meet for dinner, worship and 
discussion at 5:45 p.m. on Friday, April 11th, in the 
Westminster House on Alexander Avenue. 



DUKE UNIVERSITY ARTISTS SERIES 
SHIRLEY VERRETT, MEZZO-SOPRANO 

Shirley Verrett, brilliant young mezzo-soprano, will be 
presented on Friday, April 11th, as the third offering of the 
Duke Artists Series. Single tickets, priced at $3.25, $2.75, 
and $3.25, are available at Page Box Office; reservations 
may be called in to 684-4059. Miss Verrett's concert will 
begin at 8:15 p.m. in Page Auditorium; she is a recent 
addition to the Hurok roster of stars. 

In the space of some five seasons the American 
mezD-soprano has become firmly established as an 
international singing star of the first magnitude. This season 
alone she sings Carmen in Florence, Rossini's Stabat Mater 
in Rome, and Amneris, Eboli and Brangaene at Covent 
Garden. Her performance as Queen Elizabeth in the 
American Opera Society's Maris Stuarda this December 
brought from the New York Times the comment, "Her 
voice has blossomed into a big, brilliant instrument," and 
the New Yorker reported, "Shirley Verrett, a 
mezzo-soprano of striking appearance sang the role 
majestically." This season she made her debut at the 
Metropolitan Opera as Carmen. 

Her program follows: 

Two Arias from "Alcina" Handel 

Mi lusinga il dolce affetto 
E gelosia 

Vier ernste Gesange, Opus 121 Brahms 

Denn es genet dem Menschen 
Ich wandte mich 
O Tod, wie bitter 
Wenn ich mit Menschen 

Aria d'Orpheer Gluck 

A mour, viens rendre a mon ame 

Trois Chansons de Negresse, Opus 148b Milhaud 

Mon Histoire 
Abandonnee 
Sans Feu ni lieu 

Zigeuner Melodien, Opus 55 Dvorak 

Mein Lied ertont 
Ei, wie mein Triangel 
Rings istder Wald 
Alsdie alte Mutter 
Reingestimmt die saiten 
In dem weiten, breiten Luftgen Leinenkleide 
Darf des Falken Schwinge 



JAZZ AT THE COFFEEHOUSE 

The Jazz Quartet will perform at the Celestial Omnibus 
beginning at 8:30 p.m. on Saturday, April 12th. The 
Quartet was formed around Vernon Pratt of the Art 
Department, making its first appearance at Duke at a 
Windsor House function last winter. Tastes of the group are 
fairly progressive, tending expecially to Miles Davis and 
John Coltrane. Of the members of the group, two, Vemon 
Pratt, tenor and Freeman Ledbetter, bass are from Duke 
and have performed in the coffeehouse before as well as 
regionally at the "Frog and Nightgown." Messrs. Bright, 



piano and Corbett, drums perform throughout the state. 
They will be making tneir second appearance at Duke. A 
special menu will be offered. There will be a cover charge of 
$1.00. 



SENIOR ORGAN RECITAL 
MARY ETTA EYLER 

The Department of Music will present a senior organ 
recital by Mary Etta Eyler on Sunday, April 13th, at 4:00 
p.m. in the University Chapel. Miss Eyler is a student of 
Mrs. Mildred L. Hendrix, Assistant Professor of Music. The 
University Community and general public are cordially 
invited to attend. 

The program will be as follows: 

Chorale: Da Jesus an dem Kreuze standt Scheldt 

Prelude, Fugue, and Chaconne Buxtehude 

Chorale Prelude: Herzlich tut mich uerlangen Brahms 

Prelude and Fugue in G Major J.S. Bach 

La Nativite from Poemes Evangeliques Langlais 

Concerto No. 5 in F Major Handel 

Larghetto 
Allegro 
Alia siciliana 
Presto 

Chorale in A Minor from Trois Chorals 

pour Grand Orgue Franck 



ADVANCE NOTICE 
NIKOLAIS DANCE COMPANY 

Tickets are now available in Page Box Office for the 
Tuesday, April 29th performance of the Nikolais Dance 
Company. Priced at $3.50, $3.00, and $2.50, tickets may 
be ordered by sending a check made payable to Duke 
University and sent to Box KM Duke Station and enclosing 
a stamped, self-addressed envelope for ticket return. 

"There is classic ballet, there is modern dance and there 
is Alwin MNikolais... Obviously he is one of the most 
important men ever to hit theater dance. No one interested 
in the arts of the theater can affort to ignore Mr. Nikolais, 
who combines the roles of poet and showman in a strangley 
meaningful way.. .this is the new theater and Alwin Nikolais 
its prophet." 



DUKE UNIVERSITY ARTISTS SERIES 

GARY GRAFFMAN, PIANIST 

REPLACES CLIFFORD CURZON 

Gary Graffman, considered by many to be the top 
American pianist, will perform in Page Auditorium at 8:15 
p.m. on Wednesday, May 7th. The Artists Series Committee 
is pleased to present Mr. Graffman as replacemdnt for 
Clifford Curzon who was unable to fill his engagement 
because of illness and, finally, because of scheduling 
conflicts. Season ticket holders are asked to use their 
Curzon tickets for this event. 



Those wishing tickets for the concert by Shirley Verrett, 
soprano, on Friday, April 11th, and the Graffman recital on 
Wednesday, May 7th, may secure them at Page Box Office 
from 9:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m. on Mondays through 
Fridays. Tickets are priced at $3.25, $2.75, and $2.25. 
Reservations may be made by calling 684-4059. 



STUDENT UNION ART EXHIBITION 
ED CONNELLY 

A one-man show by Newport artist Ed Connelly may 
now be seen in the Gallery of the Woman's College Library. 
The exhibition is presented by the Student Union Graphic 
Arts Committee and will remain hanging through May 1st. 
The collection of fifty-four works includes paintings in oil, 
watercolor and acrylic as well as pen and ink drawings and 
scissor drawings. The public is cordially invited to visit this 
beautiful exhibit during regular library hours. 

Mr. Connelly is a native of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 
and his academic and professional studies were done at the 
Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, The Barnes 
Foundation, the University of Pennsylvania, the Academie 
De La Grande Chaumiere in Paris and extensive study in 
European museums and galleries. His work is represented in 
major museums and private collections and besides his 
connection with Bythesea Studio and Gallery in Newport, 
Rhode Island, he teaches at the Newport School for Girls 
and Bumham-By-The-Sea Summer School in Newport. 



STUDENT UNION ART EXHIBITION 
CONTEMPORARY PRINTS FROM FRANCE 

The Student Union Graphic Arts Committee announces 
the showing in the Gallery area of West Union Building of a 
collection of Contemporary Prints from France, an 
International Exchange Exhibit. The exhibit may be visited 
through April 21st. 

For the third time Oregon State University has 
assembled a major collection of original Contemporary 
Prints from France for exhibition throughout the United 
States. Two hundred prints by more than a hundred French 
artists have already been shown to the American public 
during the last ten years. Now fifty new names appear in 
"France III." 

The selection of prints from the present exhibit, made in 
Paris by Dr. Gordon W. Gilkey, is very revealing. Not only 
do French and foreign artists living in France, working in a 
variety of aesthetic directions, share equal attention but 
more than half of the artists are age thirty to forty. Strong 
in a five centuries old tradition, Paris continues to affirm 
herself as one of the most active centers of printmaking. 

In Paris today there exists a very special climate of 
fervor in printmaking. Whether in black and white or color; 
in intaglio, relief or planographic form; prints displayed in 
studios, on gallery walls or stacked in portfolios or print 
cases; original printmaking— practiced more and more 
today— draws upon and borrows from tradition but also 
presents a new audacity. Printmaking is incontestably one 
of the great glories of the School of Paris and of France. 






SPECIAL UNIVERSITY ANNOUNCEMENTS 

Professor Charles W. Ralston, Acting Dean, has been 
appointed Dean of the School of Forestry, effective April 
1, 1969. 



The office for the Cooperative Program in the 
Humanities (Professor Hans Hillerbrand, co-chairman) and 
the Southeastern Institute of Medieval and Renaissance 
Studies (Professor Dale B.J. Randall, co-chairman) is now 
located in Room 341 Perkins Library, extension 5637. 



Professor John C. McKinney, Department of Sociology 
and Anthropology, has been appointed Vice Provost, and 
Dean of the Graduate School, effective July 1, 1969. 



NOTICES for the Duke University Calendar 
should be submitted IN WRITTEN FORM to Room 
207 Flowers Building, not later than 5:00 p.m., 
Tuesday. Ext. 2911. 



EUROPEAN GROUP FLIGHTS: SUMMER 1969 



For the eighth consecutive year, the Student Activities 
: Office, 202-A Flowers Building, is offering Duke European 
: Group Fare Flights to members of the Duke University 
i Community (faculty, staff, students, and employees). The 
I Activities Office will provide tickets only for economy class 
ijet air transportation. All other arrangements are the 
: responsibility of the individual. 

All faculty, staff, students, and employees of Duke 

University are eligible who have been associated with Duke 

for six months prior to departure times. 

Dates . . . 

Flight 1 (Wash.) Pan Am June 9 (Paris) Pan Am Aug. 26 
Flight 2 (NYC) Air India June 9 (Lon.) Air India Aug. 28 
i Flight 3 (NYC) Air India June 10 (Lon.) Air India July 14 
j Flight 4 (NYC) Pan Am July 23 (Lon.) Pan Am Aug. 27 
| Application forms are available at the Flowers Information 
: Desk and Room 207 Flowers Building. 



Fares . 



Minimum of 25 persons 



NYC to London 

Adult $300.00 

Child (12 & over) 300.00 
Child (2-11) . . . 150.00 
Child (under 2) . . .30.00 



Washington to Paris i 

Adult $363.80:; 

Child (12 & over) 363.80: 
Child (2-11) . . . 181.90; 
Child (under 2) . . .36.40:! 



Minimum of 50 persons 



NYC to London 

Adult $245.00 

Child (12 & over) 245.00 
Child (2-11) . . . 122.50 
Child (under 2) . . .24.50 



Washington to Paris : : 

Adult $297.80: 

Child ( 12 & over) 297.80: 
Child (2-11) . . . 148.90: 
Child (under 2) . . .29.80: 



(All fares are effective as of 1 April 1968) 
Child's fare is based on age on date of flight departure. No: 
deposit required for children under 12. 



Duke University 

CALENDAR- 




Volume 69 



Published April 11, 1969 



April 13-20, 1969 

«■■■■— — IMI ■■■ IIBII f IMIIBIIMMMM^B I 

Number 14 



Sunday, April 13 

10:30-10:45 a.m. Carillon Recital. Mr. J. Samuel 
Hammond, University Carillonneur. 

11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship. University 
Chapel. Preacher: The Reverend Dr. Waldo Beach, 
Professor of Christian Ethics. Sermon: ''God and 
Morality." Broadcast over Radio Station WDNC. 

11:25 a.m. Duke University Radio Program, ' Challenges in 
Education." WCHL Chapel Hill. Dr. Ian Maclntyre will 
discuss "Animals That Don't Belong." 

3:00 p.m. Inter- Varsity Christian Fellowship Symposium. 
Baldwin Auditorium. 

3:00—5:00 p.m. East Campus Gymnasium: Open to 
students, faculty, and staff for recreation (swimming, 
badminton, volleyball, basketball, table tennis). 

4:00 p.m. Senior Organ Recital: Mary Etta Eyler. 
University Chapel. 

4:00—6:00 p.m. International Open House. 2022 Campus 
Drive. 

5:30 p.m. UCM Meeting. Rides leave East Campus Circle. 

7:00 and 9:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page Auditorium. 
"GUESS WHO'S COMING TO DINNER" with Spencer 
Tracy, Sidney Poitier, Cecil Kellaway, Beah Richards. 
"Irrepressible, entertaining helping of comedy-drama 
on liberals and interracial marriages faced head-on. 
Liberal parents face test of conscience when daughter 
comes homes with Negro doctor she wants to marry. 
Definitely worth seeing." - Cue. In color. 

7:30 p.m. Inter-Varsity Christian Fellowship Symposium. 
Baldwin Auditorium. 

7:30 p.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Challenges in 
Education." WPTF Raleigh. Dr. Orrin Pilkey will 
discuss "Exploring the Hatteras Canyon.' 

Monday, April 14 

4:00 p.m. Duke— UNC Cooperative Program in the 

Humanities Lecture: Sir Herbert Butterfield. Room 

208 Flowers Building. 
4:00 p.m. Commonwealth Studies Lecture. Room 226 

Allen Building. Speaker: Professor Kenneth McNaught. 
4:15 p.m. Zoology Seminar. Room 111 Biological Sciences 

Building. Speaker: Dr. Edward C. Horn. 
4:15—5:30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 

faculty, staff members, and students. 
5:15 p.m. Faculty Volleyball. Card Gymnasium. 
7:00 p.m. E.I.T. Lecture Series in Kinematics and 

Dynamics. Auditorium, Engineering Building. 



7:15 p.m. University Seminar 199. "A" Qning Room, 
Men's Graduate Center. Speaker: Professor Kenneth 
McNaught. 

8:00 p.m. Sigma Xi National Lecturer: Professor Peter van 
de Kamp. Auditorium, Biological Sciences Building. 

8:15—9:30 p.m. West Campus Swimming Pool open to 
faculty members and their families. Faculty children 
will be admitted only when accompanied by their 
parents. 



Tuesday, April 15 

10:00 a.m. Divinity School Chapel Service. University 

Chapel. Speaker: Dr. Charles Rogers. Reader: Mr. Rick 

Martin. 
2:00 p.m. Mathematics Film Series: 'John von Neumann." 

Room 114 Physics Building. 
4:15—5:30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 

faculty, staff members, and students. 
7:00—10:00 p.m. Arts and Crafts Workshop in 

Two-Dimensional Media. Room 108 Art Building. 
7:30—10:00 p.m. Scottish Country Dancing. Presbyterian 

Student Center. 
8:15 p.m. North Carolina Society Archaeological Institute 

Lecture. Room 139 Social Science Building. Speaker: 

LY C.W.J. Hiot. 



Wednesday, April 16 

10:00 a.m. Divinity School Chapel Service. University 

Chapel. Speaker: Mr. Bill Smalling. 
4:00 p.m. Department of Romance Languages Lecture. 

Green Room, East Duke Building. Speaker: Professor 

Mark Musa. 
4:00 p.m. Psychology Colloquium Karl Zener Auditorium, 

Room 130 Psychology— Sociology Building. Speaker: 

Dr. Irvin Rock. 
4:15—5:30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 

faculty, staff members, and students. 
6:25-8:00 p.m. Chapel Choir Rehearsal. University 

Chapel. 
7:00—9:00 p.m. Open House Badminton for all men and 

women: faculty and students. East Campus 

Gymnasium. 
8:15 p.m. Arts Festival Lecture. Music Room, East Duke 

Building. Speaker: Mr. Jay Broad. 



Thursday, April 17 

10:00 a.m. Divinity School Chapel Service. University 

Chapel. Speaker: Mr. Steve Burgess. 
4:00 p.m. Modern Trends in Hinduism. Room 208 Flowers 

Building. Speaker: Dr. Philip H. Ashby. 
4:15—5:30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 

faculty, staff members, and students. 
5:00—6:00 p.m. Dean's Hour. Hospital Amphitheater. 

Speaker: Dr. James F. Glenn. 
5:15 p.m. Faculty Volleyball. Card Gymnasium. 
6:00 p.m. Newcomers Club Meeting. Teer House, 4019 

North Roxboro Road. 
7:00 p.m. Friends os the Library Dinner. Union Ballroom, 

West Campus. Speaker: Mrs. Frances Gray Patton. 
7:00-10:00 p.m. Arts and Crafts Workshop in 

Two-Dimensional Media. Room 108 Art Building. 
7:30 p.m. People for the Land Meeting. Room 114 

Biological Sciences Building. 
8:00 p.m. Slavic Languages and Literatures Department 

Lecture. Room 136 Social Science Building. Speaker: 

Professor William B. Edgerton. 
8:15 p.m. Modern Trends in Hinduism. Room 208 Flowers 

Building. Speaker: LV. Philip H. Ashby. 
8:15—9:30 p.m. West Campus Swimming Pool open to 

faculty members and their families. Faculty children 

will be admitted only when accompanied by their 

parents. 



Friday, April 18 

Sophomore— Father Weekend 
10:00 a.m. Divinity School Chapel Service. University 

Chapel. Speaker: Mr. Fred Horton. 
12:00 p.m. Plant Ecology Seminar. Room 144 Biological 

Sciences Building. Speaker: Dr. A.H. Hawley. 
3:30 p.m. Chemistry Staff Seminar. Room 130 

Psychology— Sociology Building. Speaker: Dr. Edward 

M. Arnett. 
4:00 p.m. Center for Commonwealth Studies Lecture. 

Room 136 Social Science Building. Speaker: Professor 

Julian Beinart. 
4:00 p.m. Anthropology Seminar. Room 139 Social 

Science Building. Speaker: Dr. Harold W. Scheffler. 
4:00 p.m. Modem Trends in Hinduism. Room 208 Flowers 

Building. Speaker: Dr. Philip H. Ashby. 
4:00 — 6:00 p.m. Sophomore— Father Weekend. 

Registration for Fathers in Dormitory Foyers (See 

Special Notice). 
4:15—5:30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 

faculty, staff members, and students. Faculty 

daughters, ages 6 to 16, may also swim; those 10 and 

under must be accompanied by their mothers. 
5:45 p.m. UCM Meeting. Westminster House, Alexander 

Avenue. 
7:00—9:00 p.m. Open House Badminton for all men and 

women: faculty and students. East Campus 

Gymnasium. 
8:00 p.m. Student Union Cinematic Arts Committee Film 

Series. Auditorium, Biological Sciences Building. 

"IKIMONO NO KIROKU' : ("1 Live in Fear' ) directed 



by Akira Kurosawa. A powerful drama about the atom 
bomb and human dignity, this movie deals with the 
problem of surviving under fear and the ruin of a 
family who succumbs to fear. "RHINOCEROS." The 
theme of mass conformity is dealt with in a simple and 
beautiful animated film directed and written by Jan 
Lenica and Eugene Ionesco. 

8:15 p.m. Joint Glee Clubs Concert. Page Auditorium. 

8:30-12:00 p.m. Folk Concert. CO. Coffeehouse, 
Flowers Basement. 

Saturday, April 19 

Sophomore— Father Weekend 
10:55 a.m. Duke University Radio Program, ' Challenges in 

Education." WDNC Durham. Dr. Ian Maclntyre will 

discuss "Animals That Don't Belong." 
3:00—5:00 p.m. East Campus Gymnasium: Open to 

students, faculty, and staff for recreation (swimming, 

badminton, volleyball, basketball, table tennis). 
4:00 p.m. Annual Music Conference: "The Eighteenth 

Century: Between Baroque and Romantic." Music 

Room, East Duke Building. (See Special Notice). 
7:00 and 9:00 p.m. Quadrangle Pictures. Page Auditorium. 

"THE MIKADO." An actual performance of the 

brilliant Gilbert and Sullivan opera by the D'Oyly 

Carte Opera Company. 
10:00-12:00 p.m. Folk Concert. CO. Coffeehouse, 

Flowers Basement. 

Sunday, April 20 

Sophomore— Father Weekend 
10:30—10:45 a.m. Carillon Recital. Mr. J. Samuel 

Hammond, University Carillonneur. 
11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship. University 

Chapel. Preacher: The Reverend Dr. Bradford S. 

Abernethy, Chaplain to Rutgers University. Broadcast 

over Radio Station WDNC. 
11:25 a.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Challenges in 

Education." WCHL Chapel Hill. 
3:00—5:00 p.m. East Campus Gymnasium: Open to 

students, faculty, and staff for recreation (swimming, 

badminton, volleyball, basketball, table tennis). 
4:00—6:00 p.m. International Open House. 2022 Campus 

Drive. 
7:00 p.m. Senior ftcital: Vangie Horton, Pianist. Music 

Room, East Duke Building. 
8:30 p.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Challenges in 

Education." WPTF Raleigh. Mrs. Barbara Singleton will 

discuss "Pre-School for the Hearing Impaired Child." 



X: Published by Duke University Student Activities :* 

:•:• Department, Box KM, Duke Station, Durham, N.C, :•:• 

:•:• 27706 each week when school is in session. :•:• 

% Subscriptions: $2.50 per year. Address inquiries to :•:• 

:| Box KM, Duke Station, Durham, N.C. 27706. Second 3 

:•:• class postage paid at Durham, N.C. 






UNIVERSITY SERVICE OF WORSHIP 

The Reverend Dr. Waldo Beach, Professor of Christian 
Ethics, will deliver the sermon at the University Service of 
Worship on Sunday, April 13th, at 11:00 a.m. in the 
University Chapel. The sermon topic will be "God and 
Morality." 



SENIOR ORGAN RECITAL 
MARY ETTA EYLER 

The Department of Music will present a senior organ 
recital by Mary Etta Eyler on Sunday, April 13th, at 4:00 
p.m. in the University Chapel. Miss Eyler is a student of 
Mrs. Mildred L. Hendrix, Assistant Professor of Music. The 
University Community and general public are cordially 
invited to attend. 

The program will be as follows: 

Chorale: Ea Jesus an dem Kreuze standt Scheidt 

Prelude, Fugue, and Chaconne Buxtehude 

Chorale Prelude: Herzlich tut mich verlangen Brahms 

Prelude and Fugue in G Major J.S. Bach 

La Nativite from Poemes Evangeliques Langlais 

Concerto No. 5 in F Major Handel 

Larghetto 
A llegro 
Alia siciliana 
Presto 

Chorale in A Minor from Trois Chorals Franck 

pour Grand Orgue 

UCM MEETINGS 

The Westminster Fellowship and the United Campus 
Christian Fellowship, nurture groups of the University 
Christian Movement, will meet on Sunday evening, April 
13th, with a SSOC representative to discuss "Strategies for 
Social Change." Rides will leave from the East Campus 
circle at 5:30 p.m. 

The Westminster Fellowship and the United Campus 
Christian Fellowship will meet for dinner, worship and 
discussion at 5:45 p.m. on Friday, April 18th, in the 
Westminster House on Alexander Avenue. 

COMMONWEALTH STUDIES LECTURE 
KENNETH MCNAUGHT 

The Commonwealth Studies Committee will present a 
lecture by Professor Kenneth McNaught of the University 
of Toronto on Monday, April 14th, at 3:30 p.m. in Room 
226 Allen Building. Professor McNaught will speak on "The 
Role of Third Parties in Canada and the United States." At 
7:15 p.m. on the same day, Dr. McNaught will speak to the 
University Seminar 199 on "Violence in Canadian History" 
in "A" Dining Room, Men's Graduate Center. Members of 
the University Community are invited to attend both 
sessions. 



ZOOLOGY SEMINAR 

The Department of Zoology will hold a seminar on 
Monday, April 14th, at 4:15 p.m. in Room 111 Biological 
Sciences Building. Dr. Edward C. Horn, Professor and 
Chairman of the Department of Zoology, will speak on 
"The Thymus and Immunogenesis." A graduate of Trinity 
College and Princeton, Dr. Horn taught at Russell Sage 
College and the University of Arizona before coming to 
Duke in 1946. He has worked on a wide variety of topics, 
most of them related to development and has been 
Chairman ,of the Zoology Department since 1960. His 
seminar will deal with research carried out during his recent 
sabbatical year in Australia. Coffee and tea will be served at 
4:00 p.m. 

SIGMA XI NATIONAL LECTURER 
PROFESSOR PETER VAN DE KAMP 

Professor Peter van de Kamp, Director of the Sproul 
Observatory, Swarthmore College, will deliver a Sigma Xi 
National Lecture Monday evening, April 14th, at 8:00 p.m. 
in the Biological Sciences Auditorium, on the topic, "The 
Search for Extra-Solar Planets." He will discuss the 
observational difficulties in detecting planets near stars 
other than our own and present some recently obtained 
results. Undergraduates, graduates, and all others in the 
University Community with an interest in astronomy are 
urged to attend. 

ARCHAEOLOGY LECTURE 

For its last open meeting of the current season the North 
Carolina Society of the Archaeological Institute of America 
will present Professor C.W.J. Eliot of the University of 
British Columbia in an illustrated lecture on "Athens in the 
Time of Lord Byron." Formerly Secretary of the American 
School of Classical Studies at Athens, and a veteran of the 
American excavations at Athens, Corinth and Lerna, Dr. 
Eliot has made a special study of Byron in Greece. He will 
lecture at 8:15 p.m. on Tuesday, April 15th, in Room 139 
Social Science Building. The public is invited. 

DEPARTMENT OF ROMANCE LANGUAGES LECTURE 
PROFESSOR MARK MUSA 

The Department of Romance Languages will sponsor a 
lecture by Mark Musa, Professor of Italian, Indiana 
University on Wednesday, April 16th, at 4:00 p.m. in the 
Green Room, East Duke Building. The subject of the 
lecture will be "Inferno V: A Lesson in Lust." All are 
cordially invited to attend. 

PSYCHOLOGY COLLOQUIUM 

The Department of Psychology will hold a colloquium 
on Wednesday, April 16th, at 4:00 p.m. in Room 130 
Psychology— Sociology Building. Dr. Irvin Rock of Rutgers 
University will speak on "The Intelligence of Perception." 

ARTS FESTIVAL LECTURE 
JAY BROAD 

The Arts Festival Committee invites the University 
Community and the general public to an open lecture by 
Mr. Jay Broad on Wednesday, April 16th, at 8:15 p.m. in 



the Music Room, East Duke Building. Mr. Broad, co-author 
and director of "Red, White, and Maddox," will talk about 
the modern theater. He began Theater Atlanta's 
professional company four years ago and directed 
twenty-five productions there. Mr. Broad came to Atlanta 
from off-Broadway, where he was director from Claderon's 
"Life Is a Dream" and Harry Granick's "Witches' Sabbath." 
In Atlanta he has directed "MacBird" and he has recently 
taken his latest production, "Red, White, and Maddox" to 
Broadway. 



MODERN TRENDS IN HINDUISM 
PHILIP H. ASHBY 

Dr. Philip H. Ashby of Princeton University will present 
three public lectures on "Modern Trends in Hinduism" on 
Thursday, April 17th and Friday, April 18th in Room 208 
Flowers Building. He will lecture on "Hinduism and 
Contemporary Indian Youth" at 4:00 p.m. Thursday 
afternoon and on "Hindu Religion and Culture in Indian 
Politics" at 8:15 p.m. Thursday evening. The third lecture, 
"The Hindu Promise and Its Dilemma," will be given at 
4:00 p.m. on Friday afternoon. 

Professor Ashby, who spent last year in India, is the 
American Council of Learned Societies' lecturer on the 
history of religions. The lectures are sponsored locally by 
the Program in Comparative Studies on Southeast Asia, the 
Department of Religion, and the Divinity School. 



DEAN'S HOUR 

The Dean's Hour will be held on Thursday, April 17th, 
from 5:00 to 6:00 p.m. in the Hospital Amphitheater. Dr. 
James F. Glenn, Chief, Division of Urology and Professor of 
Urology, will speak on "Medical Education in Vietnam." 



NEWCOMERS CLUB MEETING 

The Newcomers Club of the Campus Club will have a 
potluck family supper at 6:00 p.m. on Thursday, April 
17th at the Teer House, 4019 North Roxboro Road. Mrs. 
Erdman Palmore is chairman for the meeting. 



FRIENDS OF THE LIBRARY DINNER 

The annual dinner meeting of the Friends of the Library 
will be held on Thursday, April 17th, at 7:00 p.m. in the 
Union Ballroom, West Campus. The speaker, Mrs. Frances 
Gray Patton, one of North Carolina's best known writers, 
will speak on "From Verse to Worse." Mrs. Patton is the 
author of The Finer Things of Life, Good Morning, Miss 
Dove, and A Piece of Luck, as well as many short stories 
and articles published in various periodicals. 



PEOPLE FOR THE LAND MEETING 

There will be a meeting of the People for the Land on 
Thursday, April 17th, at 7:30 p.m. in Room 114 Biological 
Sciences Building. The People for the Land is a campus 
organization interested in working for conservation and 
related issues— especially concerned, at the moment, with 
the problems of the Eno River and Umstead Park. 



SLAVIC LANGUAGES LECTURE 
WILLIAM B. EDGERTON 

The Slavic Languages and Literatures Department will 
present a lecture by Professor William B. Edgerton of the 
Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures, Indiana 
University, on Thursday, April 17th. Professor Edgerton 
will speak at 8:00 p.m. in Room 136 Social Science 
Building on "Russian Nihilism of the 1860's and the 
American New Left of the 1960's." 



PLANT ECOLOGY SEMINAR 

Dr. A.H. Hawley will present a seminar on "The 
Approach of Human Ecology" at the Plant Ecology 
Seminar on Friday, April 18th, at 12:00 p.m. in Room 144 
Biological Sciences Building. Dr. Hawley is Professor 
Sociology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel 
Hill. He is a nationally recognized expert on human 
ecology. 



CHEMISTRY STAFF SEMINAR 

Dr. Edward M. Arnett, Department of Chemistry, 
University of Pittsburgh, will speak at the Chemistry Staff 
Seminar on Friday, April 18th, at 3:30 p.m. in Room 130 
Psychology— Sociology Building. The subject of Dr. 
Arnett's address will be "Weak Bases in Strong Acids." All 
interested persons are cordially invited to attend. 



COMMONWEALTH STUDIES LECTURE 
JULIAN BEINART 

The Center for Commonwealth Studies will present a 
lecture by Julian Beinart on Friday, April 18th, at 4:00 
p.m. in Room 136 Social Science Building. Professor 
Beinart, a practicing architect and city planner and 
Professor of Architecture and Urban and Regional Planning, 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the University 
of Cape Town, will speak on "Aspects of the City of 
Tomorrow." Professor Beinart is the author of many 
studies of architecture, regional and urban planning, and 
urban ecology, as well as works on African jazz, art and 
culture. He has studied as well as taught at the University of 
Cape Town, Yale University, and the Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology and lectured at North Carolina 
State University, the University of Witwatersrand, and 
Boston Architectural Center. 



ANTHROPOLOGY SEMINAR 

Dr. Harold W. Scheffler of the Department of 
Anthropology, Yale University, will speak on ' Siriono and 
Prescriptive Alliance" at the Anthropology Seminar at 4:00 
p.m. on Friday, April 18th, in Room 139 Social Science 
Building. 



SOPHOMORE-FATHER WEEKEND 

Dads and Daughters are in for a big treat as Operation 
D— A— D gets underway, April 18th— 20th. Sponsored by 
the sophomore class of the Woman's College, the annual 



Dad's weekend festivities will begin with a reception for 
sophomore girls and parents on Friday evening. Saturday's 
activities will include opportunities for parents to observe 
student classes, a father-faculty luncheon, and a dinner for 
parents and daughters. Sunday morning Dorm Coffees and 
a service in the Duke Chapel will conclude the weekend. 

The schedule for the weekend follows: 



Friday, April 18 
Registration for fathers 



in dormitory 



4:00-6:00 p.m. 

foyers 
5:00—7:00 p.m. Reception honoring Dads in Alumnae 

Room, East Duke Building. 

Saturday, April 19 
8:10—12:30 p.m. Fathers invited to attend classes with 

their daughters 
12:45 p.m. Luncheon for fathers with faculty, 

administration and Woman's College staff in the East 

Union 
2:00—5:00 p.m. Women's Recreation facilities available for 

Dads and Daughters 
6:00 p.m. Banquet for all guests in Great Hall of the West 

Union Building. 



SPRING CONCERT 
JOINT GLEECLUBS 

Benjamin Smith will direct the combined Men's and 
Women's Glee Clubs of one hundred and twenty-five voices 
in their traditional spring concert on Friday, April 18th at 
8:15 p.m. in Page Auditorium. James Young, accompanist, 
will be assisted by John Nicholson, string bass; David 
Erdman, guitar; and William Gudger, vibraphone and 
percussion. Tickets priced at $2.00 for the general public 
and $1.00 for students are available at Page Box Office on 
weekdays from 9:00 a.m. until 4:30 p.m.; they may also be 
purchased at the Box Office on the night of the concert. 

Miss Elizabeth Lamason and Mr. Thomas Clark are 
presently serving as presidents of of two groups. 

The program follows: 



Heilig, Heilig 

Psalmkonzert 
Allegro 
Andante 

A llegro non troppo 
(Repeat of I) 

Litanies a la Vierge Noire 
(For women's voices) 

Psalm 90 

Canon for four voices 

Gaudeamus Igitur 

Arranged by James Young 

Ballad of Little Musgrave and 
Lady Barnard 

(For men's voices) 



Mendelssohn 



Zimmermann 



Poulenc 

Ives 

Mozart 

Anonymous 

Britten 



The Unicorn, The Gorgon, and 
The Manticore 

Porgy and Bess 
Act I— Finale 



Menotti 



Gershwin 



CO. COFFEEHOUSE 
FOLK CONCERTS 

Understandably, folk music and candlelight have always 
been the most delightful combination at the Coffeehouse. 
Even its location in the basement of Flowers does not seem 
to deter the faithful. This Friday and Saturday, April 18th 
and 19th will see three experienced performers take the 
stage. All have performed at the Coffeehouse before. Doug 
Dawson plays some of his own compositions, backed up by 
an extensive repertoire of well-known songs. Mary 
Torrington has for a long time distinguished herself in 
playing the old standbys we all know and enjoy. Last, but 
in no way least, Don Grant deserves mention not only as a 
single performer but as a member of the "Aunt Ruthie 
Woods" Blues Band. His "bag" is mainly blues and the soft 
and easy song. Admission will be fifty cents. The 
coffeehouse invited you to two evenings of folk from 8:30 
until 12:00 p.m. on Friday and from 10:00 until 12:00 
p.m. on Saturday. 



ANNUAL MUSIC CONFERENCE 
18TH CENTURY MUSIC 

Events of The Eighth Annual Music Conference 
sponsored by the Department of Music will deal with THE 
EIGHTEENTH CENTURY: BETWEEN BAROQUE AND 
ROMANTIC. Featured guests for the conference will be 
two prominent scholars who have done much to clarify and 
illuminate the period and who are well known for their 
work on Haydn: Laszlo Somfai, a leading European scholar 
on 18th century music who is currently in the United 
States on a Ford Foundation exchange program, and H.C. 
Robbins Landon, one of the leading researchers and 
promoters of Haydn music and author of The Symphonies 
of Joseph Haydn, a fundamental and comprehensive study 
of this composer. 

The program for the conference follows and the public is 
cordially invited to attend the events of the weekend. 

Saturday, April 19 
4:00 p.m. Lecture by H.C. Robbins Landon on "Sturm 

und Drang." Music Room, East Duke Building 
8:15 p.m. Duke Symphony Orchestra Concert. Paul Bryan, 

Conductor. Baldwin Auditorium. Music of Johann 

Michael Haydn, Vanhal, Kraus, and Franz Joseph 

Haydn 

Sunday, April 20 
10:00 a.m. Lecture by Laszlo Somfai on "Haydn's 'Sun' 

Quartets." Music Room, East Duke Building. 
1:30 p.m. Informal Discussion: Messrs. Landon and 

Somfai, Special Participants. President's Club Room 
3:15 p.m. The Ciompi Quartet performing the 'Sun' 

Quartets. Baldwin Auditorium. 



SENIOR RECITAL 
VANGIE HORTON, PIANIST 

The Department of Music will present a senior recital by 
Vangie Horton, pianist, on Sunday, April 20th, at 7:00 
p.m. Miss Horton, who will be joined in the musical event 
by students Peter Standaart and Pamela Roberts, is a 
student of Betty Talbot. The public is cordially invited to 
attend the recital which will be held in the Music Room, 
East Duke Building. The program is as follows: 

Toccata in G minor J.S. Bach 



Sonata for Flute and Piano 
Le Merle Noir 
Three Piano Pieces, op. 119 
La cathedrale engloutie 



Poulenc 

Messiaen 

Brahms 

Debussy 



DUKE SPRING WEEKEND 
"IAN AND SYLVIA" 

Tickets priced at $2.00 a person go on sale on Monday, 
April 14th in Page Box Office for the Garden Concert of 
Ian and Sylvia, Canadian Folk Duo, returning to Duke by 
popular demand. The concert will be given in the Sarah P. 
Duke Gardens on Friday, April 25th, at 4:30 p.m. Picnic 
box suppers are also available by pre-purchase and are 
priced at $1.25. 



ADVANCE NOTICE 

S.U. MAJOR ATTRACTION 

ARETHA FRANKLIN 

The Student Union's Major Attractions Committee will 
present Aretha Franklin, outstanding female Soul vocalist, 
in concert as a highlight of the traditional Joe College 
Weekend. The concert is scheduled for 6:00 p.m. in the 
Indoor Stadium on Saturday, April 26th and tickets will go 
on sale at the outdoor Quadrangle Box Office on Tuesday, 
April 15th. Ticket prices are $4.00 for reserved seats and 
$3.50 for general admission. 

HOOF 'N HORN SHOW 
"HOW TO SUCCEED..." 

The 1969 annual Hoof 'n Horn production of the 
hilarious musical comedy, "How to Succeed in Business 
Without Really Trying" will be presented in Page 
Auditorium on Friday and Saturday evenings, April 25th 
and 26th at 8:30 p.m. Tickets, priced at $2.25, $2.00, and 
$1.75 (all seats reserved) are now on sale in Page Box Office 
on Monday through Friday from 10:30 a.m. until 4:30 
p.m. 

Charlie Appier is the director and Joe Jordon the 
producer; their staff includes Winnie Simpson, choral 
director; Bonnie Lynn Harkey, choreographer; and James 
Henry, music director. 

The leads, played by Scott Seltzer as J. Pierrepont Finch 
and Shary Smith as Rosemary Pilkington, are supported by 
Will Van Klemperer as J.B. Biggley; Cheryl Oetter as Hedy 
La Rue; Bob Rosen as Frump; Lynn Zidanic as Smitty and 
Patsy Garvin as Miss Jones. 



"How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying" 
combines the creative talents of composer-lyricist Frank 
Loesser and Writer-director Abe Burrows, who also 
collaborated on the Broadway smash "Guys and Dolls.' 
'Succeed" which starred Robert Morse and Rudy Vallee 
enjoyed an extended run on Broadway. 

The show, based on a short story by Sheperd Mead, is 
the story of a young man who climbs to a position of great 
power in the world of high-powered, high cholesterol, high- 
ulcer business, and of the girl who loyally hangs on during 
his climb and eventually wins him. The young man's success 
is not due to hard work, nor to any of the ancient 
prescriptions for success. He gets ahead by following the 
simple rules in a book called, predictably, How to Succeed 
Without Really Trying. And it turns out that these rules 
work - at least at the World Wide Wicket Co. ("World Wide 
Wickets for a Wider World"). 

ADVANCE NOTICE 
NIKOLAIS DANCE COMPANY 

Tickets are now available in Page Box Office for the 
Tuesday, April 29th performance of the Nikolais Dance 
Company. Priced at $3.50, $3.00, and $2.50, tickets may 
be ordered by sending a check made payable to Duke 
University and sent to Box KM Duke Station and enclosing 
a stamped, self-addressed envelope for ticket return. 

"There is classic ballet, there is modern dance and there 
is Alwin Nikolais.. Obviously he is one of the most 
important men ever to hit theater dance. No one interested 
in the arts of the theater can afford to ignore Mr. Nikolais, 
who combines the roles of poet and showman in a strangely 
meaningful way. ..this is the new theater and Alwin Nikolais 
its prophet." 

Walter 'ferry labels "Imago," the dance to be presented 
at Duke, as one of Alwin Nikolais' most fascinating 
excursions into fanciful realms of form, movement, sound 
and color. 

"Nikolais subtitles his work, which is divided into three 
movements and 11 dance episodes, "The City Curious." 
And he would be pleased if you saw in his creation 
something of your own community and neighbors, not as 
they are realistically but as judged through wise and 
satirical eyes. 

You may find his fantastic figures, with their out-of this 
world costumes and with flitting, dashing props which 
appear to have lives of their own in space, more pertinent 
to some unknown planet. Certainly, they would pass 
muster for the best of science fiction. But, if you look 
closely, you will see yourself in some of those idiot 
procedures and routines which sometimes become too big a 
part of our own pattern of existence. "Imago" will startle 
you with its way-out fantasies, but it'll make you chuckle 
too." 

ADVANCE NOTICE 
S.U. ANNUAL SIDE WALK EXHIBIT 

All members of the Duke Community (students, 
graduate students, faculty, staff, and employees) are invited 
to participate in the Student Union Side Walk Art Exhibit 
to be held on the West Quadrangle on Thursday, May 1st 
from 10:00 a.m. until 4:30 p.m. 

The times and location for accepting entries will be 
announced in next week's Calendar. 



STUEENT UNION ART EXHIBITION 
CONTEMPORARY PRINTS FROM FRANCE 

The Student Union Graphic Arts Committee announces 
the showing in the Gallery area of West Union Building of a 
collection of Contemporary Prints from France, an 
International Exchange Exhibit. The exhibit may be visited 
through April 21st. 

For the third time Oregon State University has 
assembled a major collection of original Contemporary 
Prints from France for exhibition throughout the United 
States. Two hundred prints by more than a hundred French 
artists have already been shown to the American public 
during the last ten years. Now fifty new names appear in 
"France III." 

The selection of prints from the present exhibit, made in 
Paris by Dr. Gordon W. Gilkey, is very revealing. Not only 
do French and foreign artists living in France, working in a 
variety of aesthetic directions, share equal attention but 
more than half of the artists are age thirty to forty. Strong 
in a five centuries old tradition, Paris continues to affirm 
herself as one of the most active centers of printmaking. 

In Paris today there exists a very special climate of 
fervor in printmaking. Whether in black and white or color; 
in intaglio, relief or planographic form; prints displayed in 
studios, on gallery walls or stacked in portfolios or print 
cases; original printmaking— practiced more and more 
today— draws upon and borrows from tradition but also 
presents a new audacity. Printmaking is incontestably one 
of the great glories of the School of Paris and of France. 



STUDENT UNION ART EXHIBITION 
ED CONNELLY 

A one-man show by Newport artist Ed Connelly may 
now be seen in the Gallery of the Woman's College Library. 
The exhibition is presented by the Student Union Graphic 
Arts Committee and will remain hanging through May 1st. 
The collection of fifty-four works includes paintings in oil, 
watercolor and acrylic as well as pen and ink drawings and 
scissor drawings. The public is cordially invited to visit this 
beautiful exhibit during regular library hours. 

Mr. Connelly is a native of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 
and his academic and professional studies were done at the 
Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, The Barnes 
Foundation, the University of Pennsylvania, the Academie 
De La Grande Chaumiere in Paris and extensive study in 
European museums and galleries. His work is represented in 
major museums and private collections and besides his 
connection with Bythesea Studio and Gallery in Newport, 
Rhode Island, he teaches at the Newport School for Girls 
and Burnham-By-The-Sea Summer School in Newport. 



HENRY SCHUMAN MUSIC PRIZE 

The Henry Schuman Music Prize of $100 will be 
awarded for the fourth time in May, 1969, to an 
undergraduate of Duke University for an original 
composition of chamber music or a distinguished paper in 
music history or analysis. Fulltime undergraduates, men as 
well as women, are eligible to compete for the prize. This 
annual award, sponsored by The Woman's College, is made 
possible through a continuing gift from Dr. and Mrs. James 



H. Semans, who have named the prize after Mr. Henry 
Schuman, a life-long friend of the Semans and Trent 
families. Musical scores and typewritten manuscripts are 
accepted in the office of the Department of Music through 
May 2, 1969. 



DUKE UNIVERSITY ARTISTS SERIES 

GARY GRAFFMAN, PIANIST 

REPLACES CLIFFORD CURZON 

Gary Graffman, considered by many to be the top 
American pianist, will perform in Page Auditorium at 8:15 
p.m. on Wednesday, May 7th. The Artists Series Committee 
is pleased to present Mr. Graffman as replacemdnt for 
Clifford Curzon who was unable to fill his engagement 
because of illness and, finally, because of scheduling 
conflicts. Season ticket holders are asked to use their 
Curzon tickets for this event. 

Those wishing tickets for the concert by Shirley Verrett, 
soprano, on Friday, April 11th, and the Graffman recital on 
Wednesday, May 7th, may secure them at Page Box Office 
from 9:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m. on Mondays through 
Fridays. Tickets are priced at $3.25, $2.75, and $2.25. 
Reservations may be made by calling 684-4059. 



ADVANCE NOTICE 
S.U. PHOTOGRAPHY CONTEST 

Deadlines for the submission of entries into the Student 
Union Annual Photography Contest-Exhibit sponsored by 
the S.U. Graphic Arts Committee are on Thursday, April 
17th from 5:00 until 7:00 p.m. and on Friday, April 18th 
from 3:00 until 7:00 p.m. Entries should be submitted to 
Room 204 Flowers Building during these times. The 
contest is open to all Duke undergraduates, graduate 
students, faculty, staff and employees. Instruction sheets 
are available at the Flowers Information Desk or in the 
Student Union Office, Room 207 Flowers Building. The 
exhibit will be up for viewing from Monday, April 21st 
through Tuesday, April 29th in the Gallery of the West 
Union Building. 

MADRIGAL CONCERT RE-SCHEDULED 

The Madrigal Singers Concert scheduled for Tuesday, 
April 15th has been postponed until Monday, April 28th at 
8:15 p.m. in the Music Room, East Duke Building. 



NOTICES for the Duke University Calendar 
should be submitted IN WRITTEN FORM to Room 
207 Flowers Building, not later than 5:00 p.m., 
Tuesday. Ext. 2911. 



EUROPEAN GROUP FLIGHTS: SUMMER 1969 



For the eighth consecutive year, the Student Activities 
Office, 202-A Flowers Building, is offering Duke European 
Group Fare Flights to members of the Duke University 
Community (faculty, staff, students, and employees). The 
Activities Office wiU provide tickets only for economy class 
jet air transportation. All other arrangements are the 
responsibility of the individual. 

All faculty, staff, students, and employees of Duke 
University are eligible who have been associated with Duke 
for six months prior to departure times. 
Dates . . . 

Flight 1 (Wash.) Pan Am June 9 (Paris) Pan Am Aug. 26 
Flight 2 (NYC) Air India June 9 (Lon.) Air India Aug. 28 
Flight 3 (NYC) Air India June 10 (Lon.) Air India July 14 
Flight 4 (NYC) Pan Am July 23 (Lon.) Pan Am Aug. 27 
Application forms are available at the Flowers Information 
Desk and Room 207 Flowers Building. 



Fares . 



Minimum of 25 persons 



NYC to London 

Adult $300.00 

Child (12 & over) 300.00 
Child (2-11) . . . 150.00 
Child (under 2) . . .30.00 



Washington to Paris 

Adult $363.80 

Child (12 & over) 363.80 
Child (2-11) . . . 181.90 
Child (under 2) . . .36.40 



Minimum of 50 persons 



NYC to London 

Adult $245.00 

Child (12 & over) 245.00 
Child (2-11) . . . 122.50 
Child (under 2) . . .24.50 



Washington to Paris 

Adult $297.80 

Child (12 & over) 297.80 
Child (2-11) . . . 148.90 
Child (under 2) . . .29.80 



(All fares are effective as of 1 April 1968) 
Child's fare is based on age on date of flight departure. No 
deposit required for children under 12. 






Duke University 

CALENDAR^ 




April 20-27,1969 



Volume 69 



Published April 18, 1969 



Number 15 



Sunday, April 20 

Sophomore— Father Weekend 
10:00 a.ra Annual Music Conference: 18th Century Music. 

Lecture by Laszlo Somfai on "Haydn's 'Sun' 

Quartets." Music Room, East Duke Building. 
10:30—10:45 a.m. Carillon Recital. Mr. J. Samuel 

Hammond, University Carillonneur. 
11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship. University 

Chapel. Preacher: The Reverend Dr. Bradford S. 

Abernethy, Chaplain to Rutgers University. Sermon: 

"A Time for Presence." Broadcast over Radio Station 

WDNC. 
11:25 a.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Challenges in 

Education." WCHL Chapel Hill. Dr. Siegfried Heyden 

will discuss "High Blood Pressure in Young People." 
1:30 p.m. Annual Music Conference: 18th Century Music. 

Informal Discussion: Messrs. Landon and Somfai, 

Special Participants. President's Club Room. 
3:00—5:00 p.m. East Campus Gymnasium: Open to 

students, faculty and staff for recreation (swimming, 

badminton, volleyball, basketball, table tennis). 
3:15 p.m. Annual Music Conference: 18th Century Music. 

The Ciompi Quartet performing the 'Sun' Quartets. 

Baldwin Auditorium. 
4:00—6:00 p.m. International Open House. 2022 Campus 

Drive. Speaker: Dr. Richard Aquila. 
7:00 p.m., Senior Recital: Vangie Horton, Pianist. Music 

Room, East Duke Building. 
7:30 p.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Challenges in 

Education." WPTF Raleigh. Mrs. Barbara Singleton will 

discuss "Pre-School for the Hearing Impaired Child." 



Monday, April 21 

4:00 p.m. Duke— UNC Cooperative Program in the 

Humanities Lecture: Sir Herbert Butterfield. Room 

208 Flowers Building. 
4:15 p.m. Zoology Seminar. Room 111 Biological Sciences 

Building. Speaker: Dr. Lincoln Pierson Brower. 
4:15—5:30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 

faculty, staff members, and students. 
5:15 p.m. Faculty Volleyball, Card Gymnasium. 
8:15 p.m. Student Union Major Speakers Last Lecture 

Series: Robert A. Van Kluyve. West Union Ballroom. 
8:15—9:30 p.m. West Campus Swimming Pool open to 

faculty members and their families. Faculty children 

will be admitted only when accompanied by their 

parents. 



Tuesday, April 22 

10:00 a.m. Divinity School Chapel Service. University 

Chapel. Speaker: Dr. Frank Young. 
1:00 p.m. The final examination of Mr. Lloyd Kenneth 

Stires for the Ph.D. degree in Psychology. Room 222 

Psychology— Sociology Building. 
4:14—5:30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 

faculty, staff members, and students. 
7:00 p.m. E.I.T. Lecture Series in Thermodynamics. 

Auditorium, Engineering Building. 
7:00-10:00 p.m. Arts and Crafts Workshop in 

Two-Dimensional Media. Room 108 Art Building. 7:30 
p.m. Tocqueville Society Meeting. Room 301 Union 

Building. 
7:30—10:00 p.m. Scottish Country Dancing. Presbyterian 

Student Center. 
8:15 p.m. Lecture— Demonstration on Electronic Music: 

Paul Earls. Music Room, East Duke Building. 
8:30 p.m. Poetry Reading. Epworth Lounge. Participants: 

Professor Lionel Stevenson and John Rosenwald. 

Wednesday, April 23 

10:00 a.m. Divinity School Chapel Service. University 

Chapel. Speaker: Dr. Frank Young. 
2:00 p.m. The final examination of Mr. James Bennett 

Lucke for the Ph.D. degree in Mathematics. Room 138 

Physics Building. 
4:00 p.m. Asian Studies— Gandhi Lecture. Room- 136 

Social Science Building. Speaker: Dr. K. Ramakrishna 

Rao. 
4:15—5:30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 

faculty, staff members, and students. 
6:25—8:00 p.m. Chapel Choir Rehearsal. University 

Chapel. 
7:00—9:00 p.m. Open House Badminton for all men and 

women: faculty and students. East Campus 

Gymnasium. 
8:00 p.m. Classical Studies Lecture. Room 125 

Engineering Building. Speaker: Sir Ronald Syme. 

Thursday, April 24 

10:00 a.m. Divinity School Chapel Service. University 
Chapel. Speaker: Mr. Willie Teague. 

4:00 p.m. Academic Council Meeting. Room 208 Flowers 
Building. 



4:15—5:30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 

faculty, staff members, and students. 
5:15 p.m. Faculty Volleyball. Card Gymnasium. 
7:00-10:00 p.m. Arts and Crafts Workshop in 

Two-Dimensional Media. Room 108 Art Building. 
8:15—9:30 p.m. West Campus Swimming Pool open to 

faculty members and their families. Faculty children 

will be admitted only when accompanied by their 

parents. 



Friday, April 25 

10:00 a.m. Divinity School Chapel Service. University 

Chapel. Special Service of Worship. 
12:30 p.m. Plant Ecology Seminar. Room 144 Biological 

Sciences Building. Speaker: Mr. Ernest Hartley. 
2:00 p.m. The final examination of Mr. John Lawrence 

Sharpe, III for the Ph.D. degree in Religion. Faculty 

Conference Room, Divinity Building. 
3:30 p.m. Political Science Seminar. Room 208 Flowers 

Building. Speaker: Professor Louis Hartz. 
3:30 p.m. Chemistry Staff Seminar. Room 130 

Psychology— Sociology Building. Speaker: Professor 

C.A. Hutchison. 
4:00 p.m. Economics Department Seminar. Room 136 

Social Science Building. Speaker: Professor Marina Von 

Neumann Whitman. 
4:00 p.m. Psychology Colloquium. Room 139 Social 

Science Building. Speaker: Dr. Robert P. Abelson. 
4:14—5:30 p.m. East Campus Pool open for women: 

faculty, staff members, and students. Faculty 

daughters, ages 6 to 16, may also swim; those 10 and 

under must be accompanied by their mothers. 
4:30 p.m. Duke Spring Weekend Garden Concert: Ian and 

Sylvia. Sarah P. Duke Gardens. 
5:45 p.m. UCM Meeting. Westminster House, Alexander 

Avenue. 
7:00—9:00 p.m. Open House Badminton for all men and 

women: faculty and students. East Campus 

Gymnasium. 
8:30 p.m. Hoof 'n Horn Presents "How to Succeed in 

Business Without Really Trying." Page Auditorium. 



Saturday, April 26 

10:55 a.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Challenges in 
Education." WDNC Durham. Dr. Siegfried Heyden will 
discuss "High Blood Pressure in Young People." 

2:00 p.m. Lacrosse: Duke vs. Air Force. Lacrosse Field 
near Indoor Stadium. 

2:30 p.m. E. Power Biggs Lecture. Music Room, East Duke 
Building. 

3:00—5:00 p.m. East Campus Gymnasium: Open to 
students, faculty, and staff for recreation (swimming, 
badminton, volleyball, basketball, table tennis). 

6:00 p.m. Student Union Major Attraction: Aretha 
Franklin. Indoor Stadium. 

8:30 p.m. Hoof 'n Horn Presents "How to Succeed in 
Business Without Really Trying." Page Auditorium 



Sunday, April 27 

10:30-10:45 a.m. Carillon Recital. Mr. J. Samuel 

Hammond, University Carillonneur. 
11:00 a.m. University Service of Worship. University 

Chapel. Preacher: The Reverend Dr. Stuart C. Henry, 

Professor of American Christianity. Broadcast over 

Radio Station WDNC. 
11:25 a.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Challenges in 

Education." WCHL Chapel Hill. Reverend Cranford 

Johnson will discuss "Project: Latin America" 
2:30 p.m. Dedication Service: Mary Duke Biddle Memorial 

Organ. Inaugural Recital: E. Power Biggs. Memorial 

Chapel of Duke University Chapel. 
2:30 p.m. Duke University Concert Band Lawn Concert. 

Duke Gardens. 
3:00—5:00 p.m. East Campus Gymnasium: Open to 

students, faculty, and staff for recreation (swimming, 

badminton, volleyball, basketball, table tennis). 
4:00—6:00 p.m. International Open House. 2022 Campus 

Drive. 
7:30 p.m. Duke University Radio Program, "Challenges in 

Education." WPTF Raleigh. Dr. Ian Maclntyre will 

discuss "Animals That Don't Belong." 
8:15 p.m. Faculty Recital: Mary Burgess, Soprano. Music 

Room, East Duke Building. 



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Department, Box KM, Duke Station, Durham, N.C., 
27706 each week when school is in session. 
Subscriptions: $2.50 per year. Address inquiries to 
Box KM, Duke Station, Durham, N.C. 27706. Second 
class postage paid at Durham, N.C. 



UNIVERSITY SERVICE OF WORSHIP 

The Reverend Dr. Bradford S. Abernethy, Chaplain to 
Rutgers University, will deliver the sermon at the University 
Service of Worship on Sunday, April 20th, at 11:00 a.m. in 
the University Chapel. The sermon topic is "A Time for 
Presence." 

INTERNATIONAL HOUSE LECTURE 

Dr. Richard Aquila of the Philosophy Department will 
speak at 4:00 p.m., Sunday, April 20th at the International 
House, 2022 Campus Drive. In Dr. Aquila's talk, 
"Philosophy and Self-Knowledge," the distinct claim to 
knowledge made by Philosophy in contrast to that made by 
the Sciences will be discussed. The public is invited. 

UCM MEETINGS 

The Westminster Fellowship and the United Campus 
Christian Fellowship, nurture groups of the University 
Christian Movement, will meet on Sunday evening, April 
20th, with Harry Partin to discuss "The New Myth and the 
Revolutionary." Rides will leave from the East Campus 
circle at 5:30 p.m. 



The Westminster Fellowship and the United Campus 
Christian Fellowship will meet for dinner, worship and 
discussion at 5:45 p.m. on Friday, April 25th at the 
Westminster House on Alexander Avenue. 

SENIOR RECITAL 
VANGIE HORTON, PIANIST 

The Department of Music will present a senior recital by 
Vangie Horton, pianist, on Sunday, April 20th, at 7:00 
p.m. Miss Horton, who will be joined in the musical event 
by students Peter Standaart and Pamela Roberts, is a 
student of Betty Talbot. The public is cordially invited to 
attend the recital which will be held in the Music Room, 
East Duke Building. The program is as follows: 

Toccata in G minor J.S. Bach 



Sonata for Flute and Piano 
Le Merle Noir 
Three Piano Pieces, op. 119 
La cathedrale engloutie 



Poulenc 

Messiaen 

Brahms 

Debussy 



ZOOLOGY SEMINAR 



The Department of Zoology will hold a seminar on 
Monday, April 21st, at 4:15 p.m. in Room 111 Biological 
Sciences Building. Dr. Lincoln Pierson Brower, Professor of 
Biology, Amherst College, will speak on "Ecological 
Chemistry and Its Evolutionary Implications." 

Lincoln Brower received his Ph.D. from Yale University, 
so, in a manner of speaking, he is a member of the 
Departmental family, However, he did his postdoctoral 
work at Oxford (rather than Cambridge). Since 1958, he 
has been at Amherst where, in collaboration with his wife, 
•lane van Zandt Brower, he has continued his studies of 
mimicry. 

Coffee and tea will be served at 4:00 p.m. 

S.U. LAST LECTURE SERIES 
ROBERT A. VAN KLUYVE 

Dr. Robert A. Van Kluyve, Associate Professor of 
English, will be presented by the Student Union Major 
Speakers Committee in the Last Lecture Series at 8:15 p.m. 
on Monday, April 21st in the West Union Ballroom. 
Professor Van Kluyve will speak on "Dehumanized 
Humanities" and the public is cordially invited to attend 
this lecture. 

Dr. Van Kluyve, at Duke since 1962, is well-known by 
students for his outstanding courses in British Literature 
and Chaucer. He is a native of New Jersey and received his 
BA and MA from the University of Rhode Island, and his 
Ph.D. from Johns Hopkins University. His book, an edition 
of a 15th century manuscript De Archana Deorum was 
cited by the Association of the American University Presses 
in the 1968 Book Show as "one of the twenty-five best 
designed and produced by a University Press." Dr. Van 
Kluyve spent the spring semester of 1967 as visiting 
professor of Paleography at the University of Illinois. One 
of his many interests is pottery making and design. Dr. Van 
Kluyve is leaving Duke this spring to take a position as a 
Professor of English and Ceramics at Federal City College in 
Washington, D.C. 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. Lloyd Kenneth Stires for 
the Ph.D. degree in Psychology will be held on Tuesday, 
April 22nd, at 1:00 p.m. in Room 222 
Psychology— Sociology Building. The subject of Mr. Stire's 
dissertation is "Leadership Designation and Perceived 
Ability as Determinants of the Tactical Use of Modesty and 
Self- Enhancement." The committee to conduct the 
examination consists of Professors Edward E. Jones, John 
Altrocchi, Darwyn E. Linder, Michael A. Wallach, and Kurt 
Back. Professor Jones will preside. 

TOCQUEVILLE SOCIETY MEETING 

The Tocqueville Society, an educational organization 
formed for the discussion of conservative philosophy, will 
hold elections for officers for the next year, at 7:30 p.m. 
on Tuesday, April 22nd, in Room 301 Union Building. 
Nominations have not been closed, thus additional 
nominations will be entertained. Following the election of 
new officers, Ken Kuehnle, present chiarman of the 
Tocqueville Society, will speak on the topic "The Care and 
Feeding of a Conservative, Edcuational Organization." 

EARLS LECTURE-DEMONSTRATION 
ELECTRONIC MUSIC 

A public lecture— demonstration of electronic music, 
using a MOOG synthesizer, will be given by Paul Earls in 
the Music Room, East Duke Building on Tuesday, April 
22nd at 8:15 p.m. The public is invited. 

POETRY READING 

On Tuesday, April 22nd, the Contempory Arts Corridor 
in Epworth Dormitory will present an evening of "Readings 
in Victorian Poetry" with Professor Lionel Stevenson and 
John Rosenwald. Included in the reading will be shorter 
works by Hopkins, Browning, Tennyson, Yeats, and a 
segment of Clough's Faustian drama Dipsychus. The 
program will begin at 8:30 p.m. in the Epworth Lounge and 
the public is invited. 

FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. James Bennett Lucke for 
the Ph.D. degree in Mathematics will be held on 
Wednesday, April 23rd, at 2:00 p.m. in Room 138 Physics 
Building. The subject of Mr. Lucke's dissertation is 
"Commutativity in Locally Compact Rings." The 
committee to conduct the examination consists of 
Professors Seth L. Warner, David Smith, Richard Hodel, 
Joseph R. Schoenfield, and Neil L. Wilson. Professor 
Warner will preside. 

ASIAN STUDIES-GANDHI LECTURE 

In celebration of the Gandhi Centenary Year, the 
Program in Comparative Studies on Southern Asia will 
sponsor a lecture by Dr. K. Ramakrishna Rao, Professor 
and Head of the Department of Psychology and 
Parapsychology at Andhra University, Waltair, India, on 
Wednesday, April 23rd, at 4:00 p.m. in Room 136 Social 
Science Building. The public is invited. 



Dr. Rao, formerly on the research staff of the 
Parapsychology Laboratory of Duke University (1962—65) 
is the author of Gandhi and Pragmatism, An Intercultural 
Study which compares American pragmatism and Gandhi's 
practical idealism and cogently expounds Gandhi's 
philosophy and its relation to action. 

CLASSICAL STUDIES LECTURE 
SIR RONALD SYME 

Sir Ronald Syme, Camden Professor of Ancient History 
at Oxford University, will speak on "Julius Caesar: Drama, 
Legend, History" at the public lecture series sponsored by 
the Department of Classical Studies. The lecture will be 
given on Wednesday, April 23rd, at 8:00 p.m. in Room 125 
Engineering Building. 

ACADEMIC COUNCIL MEETING 

The Academic Council will meet on Thursday, April 
24th, in Room 208 Flowers Building at 4:00 p.m. 

PLANT ECOLOGY SEMINAR 

Mr. Ernest Hartley, graduate student in Botany, will 
present a seminar on "The Impact of People on Alpine and 
Subalpine Vegetation in Glacier National Park" at the Plant 
Ecology Seminar on Friday, April 25th, at 12:30 p.m. in 
Room 144 Biological Sciences Building. 



FINAL EXAMINATION 
FOR THE PH.D. DEGREE 

The final examination of Mr. John Lawrence Sharpe, III 
for the Ph.D. degree in Religion will be held on Friday, 
April 25th, at 2:00 p.m. in the Faculty Conference Room, 
Divinity Building. The subject of Mr. Sharpe's dissertation 
is "Prolegomena to the Establishment of the Critical Text 
of the Greek Apocalypse of Moses." The committee to 
conduct the examination consists of Professors William 
Stinespring, Gene Tucker, Kenneth Clark, Orval 
Wintermute, William Poteat, and William H. Willis. 
Professor Stinespring will preside. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE SEMINAR 

Professor Louis Hartz of the Department of Government 
of Harvard University will address the Political Science 
fortnightly seminar on the topic "The Western Hemisphere 
as a Problem in Comparative History and Politics." The 
seminar will be held on Friday, April 25th, at 3:30 p.m. in 
Room 208 Flowers Building. Visitors will be welcome. 

CHEMISTRY STAFF SEMINAR 

Professor C.A. Hutchison of the enrico Fermi Institute 
for Nuclear Studies and the Department of Chemistry, 
University of Chicago, will speak at the Chemistry Staff 
Seminar on Friday, April 25th, at 3:30 p.m. in Room 130 
Psychology— Sociology Building. The subject of Professor 
Hutchison's address will be "Study of f-Electron Systems 
by Electron Nuclear Double Resonance Methods." All 
interested persons are cordially invited to attend. 



ECONOMICS DEPARTMENT SEMINAR 

Professor Marina Von Neumann Whitman of the 
University of Pittsburgh will speak on "A Mean- Variance 
Analysis of United States Long-Term Portfolio Foreign 
Investment" at the Economics Department Seminar which 
will be held on Friday, April 25th, at 4:00 p.m. in Room 
136 Social Science Building. 

PSYCHOLOGY COLLOQUIUM 

The Department of Psychology will hold a colloquium 
on Friday, April 25th, in Room 139 Social Science Building 
at 4:00 p.m. Dr. Robert P. Abelson, Yale University, will 
speak on "A Cognitive Theorist in Forbidden Toyland." 



JOE COLLEGE 

DUKE SPRING WEEKEND 

"THE TIMES THEY ARE A'CHANGIN'" 

SCHEDULE OF EVENTS 

Wednesday, April 23 
12:00 noon— 12:00 midnight Planter's Warehouse open for 
floatbuilding. (Geer Street, Take 1-85 to Rt. 70 
turnoff) 

Thursday, April 24 
8:00 p.m.— 1:00 a.m. Warehouse Dance and Floatbuilding. 
Entertainment by "The Shirelles" and "The Villagers" 

Friday, April 25 
2:00 p.m. Parade 

4:30 p.m. Lawn Concert: "Ian and Sylvia." Duke Gardens. 
8:30 p.m. Hoof 'n Horn: "How to Succeed in Business 
Without Really Trying." Page Auditorium. 

Saturday, April 26 
2:00 p.m. Lacrosse: Duke vs. Air Force. Lacrosse Field. 
6:00 p.m. Student Union Major Attraction: Aretha 

Franklin in Concert. Indoor Stadium. 
8:30 p.m. Hoof 'n Horn: "How to Succeed in Business 

Without Really Trying." Page Auditorium. 

DUKE SPRING WEEKEND 
"IAN AND SYLVIA" 

Tickets priced at $2.00 a person are available on the 
West Quadrangle and in Page Box Office for the Garden 
Concert of Ian and Sylvia, Canadian Folk Duo, returning to 
Duke by popular demand. The concert will be given in the 
Sarah P. Duke Gardens on Friday, April 25th, at 4:30 p.m. 
Picnic box suppers are also available by pre-purchase and 
are priced at $1.25. 

This duo's music has evolved as a unique blend of 
influences: the blues, western Canadian country music, 
Kentucky— Tennessee blue grass, and classic folk in what 
has been called "Progressive country." Singing together 
professionally since 1960 and married in 1964, Ian and 
Sylvia have made ten best selling albums and have recently 
been joined by a four man back-up group adept at a variety 
of instruments ranging from electric steel guitar and banjo 
to mouth harp and piano. The balance, tastefulness and 
sense of conviction that Ian and Sylvia have always brought 
to their music have earned them their outstanding 
reputation in the field. 



HOOF 'N HORN SHOW 
"HOW TO SUCCEED..." 

The 1969 annual Hoof 'n Horn production of the 
hilarious musical comedy, "How to Succeed in Business 
Without Really Trying" will be presented in Page 
Auditorium on Friday and Saturday evenings, April 25th 
and 26th at 8:30 p.m. Tickets, priced at $2.25, $2.00, and 
$1.75 (all seats reserved) are now on sale in Page Box Office 
on Monday through Friday from 10:30 a.m. until 4:30 
p.m. 

Charlie Appier is the director and Joe Jordon the 
producer; their staff includes Winnie Simpson, choral 
director; Bonnie Lynn Harkey, choreographer; and James 
Henry, music director. 

The leads, played by Scott Seltzer as J. Pierrepont Finch 
and Shary Smith as Rosemary Pilkington, are supported by 
Will Van Klemperer as J.B. Biggley; Cheryl Oetter as Hedy 
La Rue; Bob Rosen as Frump; Lynn Zidanic as Smitty and 
Patsy Garvin as Miss Jones. 

"How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying" 
combines the creative talents of composer-lyricist Frank 
Loesser and Writer-director Abe Burrows, who also 
collaborated on the Broadway smash "Guys and Dolls." 
"Succeed" which starred Robert Morse and Rudy Vallee 
enjoyed an extended run on Broadway. 

The show, based on a short story by Sheperd Mead, is 
the story of a young man who climbs to a position of great 
power in the world of high-powered, high cholesterol, high- 
ulcer business, and of the girl who loyally hangs on during 
his climb and eventually wins him. The young man's success 
is not due to hard work, nor to any of the ancient 
prescriptions for success. He gets ahead by following the 
simple rules in a book called, predictably, How to Succeed 
Without Really Trying. And it turns out that these rules 
work - at least at the World Wide Wicket Co. ("World Wide 
Wickets for a Wider World"). 



S.U. MAJOR ATTRACTION 
ARETHA FRANKLIN 

The Student Union's Major Attractions Committee will 
present Aretha Franklin, outstanding female Soul vocalist, 
in concert as a highlight of the traditional Joe College 
Weekend. The concert is scheduled for 6:00 p.m. in the 
Indoor Stadium on Saturday, April 26th and tickets are on 
sale on the West Quadrangle and at Page Box Office. Ticket 
prices are $4.00 for reserved seats and $3.50 for general 
admission. 

Aretha Franklin, "The best liked sound in soul music" 
today, has a string of records that would make any 
performer happy. Her first record, "I Never Loved a Man," 
sold over a million copies and since then she has collected 
over four gold records. In 1967 she sold over 1 million 
albums, won two Grammy Awards and was cited by 
Billboard magazine as the top female performer of 1967. 
Aretha, called Lady Soul by her admirers, is also famous for 
her tremendous performance on stage. Her vocal technique 
is simple; she uses a direct, natural style of delivery that 
ranges over a full four octaves, and her fierce, gritty 
conviction flexes her rich, cutting voice like a whip. 



E. POWER BIGGS LECTURE 

World renowned organist, E. Power Biggs will present a 
lecture with tape illustrations of the "Historic Organs of 
Europe and the United States" on Saturday afternoon, 
April 26th, at 2:30 p.m. in the Music Room, East Duke 
Building. The public is cordially invited to hear this 
distinguished authority without charge. 



DEDICATION SERVICE 
MARY DUKE BIDDLE MEMORIAL ORGAN 

A special service and recital will be held on Sunday 
afternoon, April 27th, at 2:30 p.m. in the Memorial Chapel 
of Duke University Chapel on the occasion of the 
dedication of the Mary Duke Biddle Memorial Organ. The 
presentation of the organ will be made by Mrs. Mary Duke 
Biddle Trent Semans and the acceptance for the Univeristy 
by President Douglas M. Knight. The inaugural recital will 
be played by E. Power Biggs, international organ virtuoso 
and scholar. 

The electro pneumatic organ was built by the Holtcamp 
Organ Company of Cleveland, Ohio with Walter Holtcamp, 
Jr. supervising its final voicing in the Memorial Chapel. 

A native of Westcliff, England, E. Power Biggs was